Interstate 10

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Interstate 10 Westbound

Santa Monica Freeway: Interstate 5 to California 1 (PCH)

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Interstate 5/Golden State Freeway south and Interstate 10 west
After Interstate 10 and Interstate 5 merge together through the East Los Angeles Interchange, this mileage sign provides the distance to Exit 135A, Fourth Street and the myriad of ramps that constitute Exits 134C-A, Junction Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west and California 60/Pomona Freeway east. The exits through the shared alignment between Interstate 5 and Interstate 10 use Interstate 5's exit numbering scheme. Photo taken 07/06/04.
The only shared exit from Interstate 5 south and Interstate 10 west is Exit 135A, Fourth Street, one-quarter mile. Note the substandard yet reflective signage for California 60 pasted on the sign bridge for left Exit 134B. Use Fourth Street to the Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights. Photo taken 07/06/04.
With so many exits in such a short time, several merges and exits, and a limited number of lanes, delays along the freeway are common. This picture shows southbound Interstate 5/westbound Interstate 10 as it prepares to split. Exit 134C is the next exit for through traffic on Interstate 10 west, while Exit 134B to California 60/Pomona Freeway east is a left exit. Photo taken 07/06/04.
At this point, Interstates 5 and 10 separate. Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway (Exit 134C) carries the three right lanes, so through traffic for Interstate 5 must stay left ... but not too far left, because the left lane connects to eastbound California 60/Pomona Freeway (Exit 134B). Photo taken 07/06/04.
Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Christopher Columbus Transcontinental) Freeway west
After Interstate 10 and Interstate 5 split, the right three lanes carry Interstate 10 west onto the Santa Monica Freeway. The first exit along Interstate 10 west after the split from Interstate 5 is Exit 16A, Santa Fe Avenue and Mateo Street. Photo taken 07/06/04.
Westbound Interstate 10 reaches Exit 16A, Santa Fe Avenue and Mateo Street just southeast of downtown Los Angeles. Both Santa Fe Avenue and Mateo Street are north-south streets that generally parallel the Los Angeles River. The Santa Monica Freeway carries Interstate 10 for the rest of its journey west. Photo taken 07/06/04.
Immediately after the Santa Fe Avenue and Mateo Street offramp, four new lanes join Interstate 10 from the left; these lanes come from California 60/Pomona Freeway west. This reassurance shield is posted after the two freeways merge together. Around this point, the Los Angeles River passes unnoticed below the elevated Santa Monica Freeway. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next exit along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west is Exit 15B, Alameda Street (one-quarter mile). Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10 west: Exit 15B, Alameda Street; Exit 15A, Central Avenue; and Exit 14B, San Pedro Street. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The Santa Monica Freeway originates in the East Los Angeles Interchange as an elevated viaduct. Originally planned as the Olympic Parkway due to its proximity to Olympic Boulevard, the Santa Monica Freeway was officially named by the California State Highway Commission on April 25, 1957. According to the California Log of Bridges on State Highways for District VII and Daniel Faigin's California Highways page, the Santa Monica Freeway opened in stages between 1961 and 1966. The Santa Monica Freeway carries Interstate 10 from the East Los Angeles Interchange west through Los Angeles to the city of Santa Monica on the Pacific coast. Another angular Interstate 10 shield is posted prior to the Alameda Street offramp. Note the lack of shoulders along this section. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 15B, Alameda Street. The next exit is Exit 15A, Central Avenue (one-half mile). Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10 west: Exit 15A, Central Avenue; Exit 14B, San Pedro Street; and Exit 14A, 17th Street to Los Angeles Street, Main Street, Broadway, and Grand Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
A variable (changeable) message sign is posted soon thereafter as the freeway turns to the northeast. The sign can provide traffic information, travel times, and Amber Alerts. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 15A, Central Avenue. The next exit along Interstate 10 west is Exit 14B, San Pedro Street. The freeway remains on an elevated viaduct. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Immediately thereafter, westbound Interstate 10 reaches Exit 14B, San Pedro Street. This is a collector-distributor lane, so through traffic may exit here and return to the mainline freeway. Meanwhile, the right (#5) lane becomes exit only for Exit 14A, 17th Street to Los Angeles Street, Main Street, Broadway, and Grand Avenue. Seventeenth Street is a frontage road along the north side of the freeway that connects to each of these major north-south arterials. The left four lanes continue west on Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway. Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next two exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west: Exit 14A, 17th Street to Los Angeles Street, Main Street, Broadway, and Grand Avenue and Exit 13, Junction Interstate 110/Harbor Freeway south to San Pedro and California 110/Harbor Freeway north to Pasadena. Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
The collector-distributor lanes connect with the offramp to Exit 14B, San Pedro Street. Merging traffic can follow the "Freeway" sign to return to the main line freeway. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Another Interstate 10 reassurance shield is posted prior to the offramp to Exit 14A, 17th Street to Los Angeles Street, Main Street, Broadway, and Grand Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The downtown Los Angeles skyline can be seen from Interstate 10's elevated viaduct looking north. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 14A, 17th Street to Los Angeles Street, Main Street, Broadway, and Grand Avenue. Use Main Street north to Pico Boulevard west to the Los Angeles Convention Center and the Staples Center (home of the National Basketball Association's Los Angeles Lakes and Los Angeles Clippers). All downtown locations can be accessed via Main Street, Broadway, Grand Avenue, and Figueroa Street north. Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
After the offramp to Exit 14A (17th Street and Los Angeles Street), the next exit along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west is Exit 13, Junction Interstate 110/Harbor Freeway south to San Pedro and Terminal Island and Junction California 110/Harbor Freeway north to downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena (via the historic Pasadena Freeway, also known as the Arroyo Seco Parkway). Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
The left three lanes continue west on Interstate 10, while the right two lanes depart to the Harbor Freeway. Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
Interstate 110 is a major north-south freeway corridor that originates in the San Pedro community of Los Angeles and travels north past Carson and Gardena into Los Angeles as the Harbor Freeway. Upon reaching Interstate 10, the Harbor Freeway changes from Interstate 110 to California 110. After passing through the downtown area, California 110 transitions onto the Pasadena Freeway, which includes the original Arroyo Seco Parkway that was built in 1940. The Harbor Freeway changes into the Pasadena Freeway at the Four-Level Interchange with U.S. 101 (Santa Ana and Hollywood Freeways). California 110/Pasadena Freeway was signed as U.S. 66 from Downtown Los Angeles to Pasadena from 1940 to 1964 and as California 11 from 1964 to 1981. Interstate 110/Harbor Freeway was signed as U.S. 6 from 1952 until 1964 and as California 11 from 1964 until 1981. (Signs for California 11 were removed from the Harbor Freeway shortly after the legislative decommissioning in 1981.) Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 13, Junction Interstate 110/Harbor Freeway south to San Pedro and Terminal Island and Junction California 110/Harbor Freeway north to downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena. Use this exit for a direct ramp to Cherry Street and Pico Boulevard near the Los Angeles Convention Center. The left three lanes continue west on Interstate 10. Photos taken 08/26/07 and 06/17/06.
Now on the offramp to Interstate 110/Harbor Freeway, the left two lanes connect to Interstate 110 south and the right two lanes connect to California 110/Harbor Freeway north and Pico Boulevard to the Los Angeles Convention Center. Photos taken 08/26/07.
Transitioning to California 110/Harbor Freeway is this offramp to Cherry Street north to Pico Boulevard. Use Pico Boulevard east to the Los Angeles Convention Center. To the west, Pico Boulevard travels west through the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Country Club Park, Mid-City, South Robertson, Rancho Park, and Sawtelle before entering the city of Santa Monica. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Back on the mainline, this mileage sign provides the distance to the next four exits: Exit 12B-A, Hoover Street and Vermont Avenue and Exits 11B-A, Western Avenue and Normandie Avenue. A single slip ramp connects the main lanes of Interstate 10 west with Exits 12B and 12A, and a second slip ramp connects the main lanes to Exits 11B and 11A. Photo taken 08/24/04.
To the north of Interstate 10 at the California 110 interchange lies the gleaming high rise skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles, including the U.S. Bank Building, which is the tallest building in Los Angeles. Photo taken 08/24/04.
The next exit along Interstate 10 west is Exit 12B, Hoover Street and Exit 12A, Vermont Street (0.25 mile). The signage for the offramp to Interstate 110 and California 110 can be seen on the adjacent offramp (see above). Photo taken 08/24/04.
Passing through the Interstate 110 and California 110 (Harbor Freeway) interchange, westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway goes back to surface level. Only three through westbound lanes carry Interstate 10 through this interchange. The interchange between 10 and 110 is known as the Dosan Ahn Chang Ho Memorial Interchange. Photo taken 08/24/04.
Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) (Christopher Columbus Transcontinental) Freeway west
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway (now also known as the Rosa Parks Freeway) reaches the slip ramp to Exit 12B, Hoover Street and Exit 12A, Vermont Street. The ramp connects to the new local lanes, while the left three lanes continue along the express alignment. Photo taken 08/24/04.
West of the Interstate 110 and California 110 interchange, Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway is a dual freeway with local and express lanes. The next exit connects to the local lanes for Exits 12B-A, Hoover Street and Vermont Avenue. The local lanes essentially function as a collector-distributor lane system, and they carry a separate set of lanes carries local traffic and makes connections to the freeway exits. This view shows the local lanes as seen after the transition ramp from Interstate (California) 110 south to Interstate 10 west. During commuting hours, the collector-distributor lanes have activated meter lights. Photo taken 08/26/07.
A traffic signal ahead sign is posted for the ramp meters when flashing. Watch for slow or stopped traffic during periods of traffic metering. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Looking at the main lanes, a mileage sign shows the distance to the next two exits (slip ramp to Exit 11, Western Avenue and Normandie Avenue and Exit 10, Arlington Avenue). Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway (local lanes) reaches Exit 12 Part 1 (should be Exit 12B), Hoover Street. The next exit is Vermont Avenue, which is also considered part of Exit 12. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The local lanes split: the left two lanes pass through the ramp meter lights to merge onto the main lanes of Interstate 10 west, and the right two lanes continue along the local lanes. The next offramp connects to Vermont Avenue north and south. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Looking at the local lanes from the main lanes, westbound Interstate 10 reaches Exit 12 Part 2 (should be Exit 12A), Vermont Avenue. The next exit along westbound is Exit 11, Normandie Avenue and Western Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway is Exit 11, Normandie Avenue and Western Avenue. This is another two-part exit that should be signed as Exits 11B-A. Through traffic may use the local lanes if desired (hence the "Thru Traffic OK" sign). Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway connects to a slip ramp to the local lanes. There are two separate offramps from the local lanes: Exit 11B, Normandie Avenue and Exit 11A, Western Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Now on the local lanes, westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 11B, Normandie Avenue. The next exit from the local lanes is Exit 11A, Western Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The Normandie Avenue offramp is signed incorrectly as Exit 12. It should be signed as Exit 11 or ideally as Exit 11B. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign along Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway west provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10's main lanes: Exit 10, Arlington Avenue; Exit 9, Crenshaw Boulevard; and Exit 8, La Brea Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Back on the local lanes, westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway splits again, with the left lane linking to the main lanes and the right two lanes continuing along the local lanes with an eventual link to Exit 11A, Western Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The link between the local lanes and main lanes was at one time only open for high occupancy (carpool) vehicles, but that rule was apparently suspended. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Still on the local lanes, westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 11A, Western Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The Exit 11 gore point sign is used for the Western Avenue offramp. Photo taken 08/26/07.
An Interstate 10 west reassurance shield is posted immediately thereafter. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway is Exit 10, Arlington Avenue. This roadside sign is one of the first exit number signs to be posted in Los Angeles. Many of the reflective overhead signs were posted in 2001 or 2002, prior to the exit numbering directive. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Passing under the Western Avenue overpass is a sign on the main lanes of Interstate 10 west for the slip ramp to the local lanes for the Arlington Avenue offramp (Exit 10). Photos taken 08/24/04 and 08/26/07.
Local traffic must pass through this ramp meter prior to the Arlington Avenue offramp. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 10, Arlington Avenue (as seen from the local lanes). The next exit along Interstate 10 west is Exit 9, Crenshaw Boulevard (1.25 miles). Photos taken 08/24/04 and 08/26/07.
The Arlington Avenue offramp is properly signed at the gore point as Exit 10. The local-express configuration ends at this point, and all traffic merges onto the main lanes of Interstate 10 west. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10 west: Exit 9, Crenshaw Boulevard; Exit 8, La Brea Avenue; and Exit 7B, Washington Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway is designated as the Rosa Parks Freeway between Interstate 110/Harbor Freeway and Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway. The freeway was so designated in honor of Rosa Parks, the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement," who refused to give up a seat on a bus back in 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama. The state designated this stretch of freeway in her honor on February 4, 2002, on her 89th birthday. Photo taken 08/26/07.
A bridge identification sign for Arlington Avenue is posted below the overpass. Trucks can use the #5 lane, since the right #6 lane will become exit only ahead. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The right lane of Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west becomes exit only for Exit 9, Crenshaw Boulevard. Photo taken 08/26/07.
An exit number roadside sign for Exit 9, Crenshaw Boulevard is posted shortly thereafter. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 9, Crenshaw Boulevard. Use Crenshaw Boulevard north to the communities of Lafayette Square, Country Club Park, and Windsor Square. To the south, Crenshaw Boulevard leads to Jefferson Park, Crenshaw, Leimert Park, and Hyde Park. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next two exits along Interstate 10 west: Exit 8, La Brea Avenue and Exit 7B, Washington Boulevard west to Culver City and Fairfax Avenue north. Omitted is Exit 7A, Junction California 187/Venice Boulevard west and La Cienega Boulevard south. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next exit along Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway west is Exit 8, La Brea Avenue (0.75 mile). Photo taken 08/26/07.
Use Exit 8 to an Accident Investigation Site (AIS) for those involved in an accident. Several AIS locations are along Interstate 10. Due to the distractions caused by traffic accidents, minor accident victims are encouraged to use the AIS rather than stop on the side of the freeway. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The right lane connects to Exit 8, La Brea Avenue. Through traffic may use this exit, as the ramp functions as a collector-distributor system. Exit 8 is a modified cloverleaf interchange. Use La Brea Avenue north to Mid-City and the Miracle Mile. To the world famous La Brea Tar Pits, use La Brea Avenue north to Wilshire Boulevard (Miracle Mile) west to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Note that since "La Brea" means "Tar Pits," the term "La Brea Tar Pits" is redundant. Photo taken 08/26/07.
An exit number sign is posted for Exit 8, La Brea Avenue. To the south, La Brea Avenue travels through Baldwin Village toward Baldwin Hills and Windsor Hills before leaving the city of Los Angeles and entering the city of Inglewood. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 8, La Brea Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The first ramp in the modified cloverleaf interchange connects with La Brea Avenue north. Photo taken 08/26/07.
An Accident Investigation Site (AIS) is embedded within the La Brea Avenue interchange (Exit 8). Photo taken 08/26/07.
Immediately thereafter is the loop ramp from westbound Interstate 10 to La Brea Avenue south. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Back on the mainline, this mileage sign provides the distance to the next two exits along Interstate 10 west: Exit 7B, Washington Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue and Exit 7A, Junction California 187/Venice Boulevard west and La Cienega Boulevard south to Interstate 405. Photo taken 08/24/04.
This Interstate 10 west reassurance shield is posted shortly after the La Brea Avenue interchange. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The right lane becomes exit only for Exit 7B, Washington Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next three exits all serve the city of Culver City, which sits south of Interstate 10. Culver City is home to 38,816 people as of the 2000 Census and incorporated on September 20, 1917. Many films and television shows have been filmed along the streets of Culver City. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Exit 7B is signed on this elevated roadside sign posted above the soundwall. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 7B, Washington Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next two exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway west: Exit 7A, Junction California 187/Venice Boulevard west and La Cienega Boulevard south to Interstate 405 and Exit 6, Robertson Boulevard. Photos taken 08/26/07 and 08/24/04.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 7A, Junction California 187/Venice Boulevard west and La Cienega Boulevard south to Interstate 405. California 187 is a mostly unsigned state highway that connects Interstate 10 Exit 7A with California 1/Pacific Coast Highway in the city of Los Angeles community of Venice. The entire route is a multi-lane divided surface street that features a wide median and was a former alignment of the Pacific Electric railway. La Cienega Boulevard is a city expressway that travels south from Interstate 10 past the Baldwin Hills to merge with Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway along the western boundary of the city of Inglewood. The La Cienega corridor is part of the proposed route of a southern segment of California 170, but the state did not accept the expressway nor does the state maintain it. To the north, La Cienega Boulevard travels toward the city of West Hollywood (incorporated November 29, 1984). Of the population of 35,716 people as of 2000 Census, the city of West Hollywood had an approximately 41% gay population as of 2002. The nightlife in West Hollywood brings myriad people to the city's downtown area every weekend. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway west: Exit 6, Robertson Boulevard; Exit 5, National Boulevard; and Exit 4, Overland Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The Museum of Tolerance is located on Pico Boulevard. Take Robertson Boulevard north to Pico Boulevard, then turn left (west). The museum is located on the south side (left side) of Pico Boulevard. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Use Robertson Boulevard north to the city of Beverly Hills, which consists of 5.7 square miles and is home to 33,784 people as of the 2000 Census. The city was incorporated on October 22, 1906, and was seen as a suburban development between Santa Monica and Los Angeles. The median household income as of 2000 was $70,945, which is not the wealthiest area in California. Known as home to many rich and famous celebrities, home tours through Beverly Hills and Bel Air are well known tourist destinations. Beverly Hills has a famed downtown area that includes Rodeo Drive and its fabulous boutique stores. Look around town for a map to find the homes of the rich and famous. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 6, Robertson Boulevard. To the south, Robertson Boulevard changes into Culver Boulevard and enters Culver City. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway west: Exit 5, National Boulevard; Exit 4, Overland Avenue; and Exits 3B-A, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway north to Santa Clarita and south to LAX (Los Angeles International Airport) and Long Beach. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Use National Boulevard west to the Los Angeles community of Palms and Manning Avenue northwest to the community of Rancho Park. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next exit along Interstate 10 west is Exit 5, National Boulevard and Manning Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This Interstate 10 west reassurance shield is posted after the onramp from Robertson Boulevard. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 5, National Boulevard and Manning Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the next three exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway west: Exit 4, Overland Avenue; Exits 3B-A, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway north to Santa Clarita and south to LAX (Los Angeles International Airport) and Long Beach; and Exits 2C-B, Bundy Drive. A flyover ramp (visible in background) connects Manning Avenue southeast with Interstate 10 east. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The next exit along Interstate 10 west is Exit 4, Overland Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
An accident investigation site is located at Exit 4, Overland Avenue. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 4, Overland Avenue. The next interchange along Interstate 10 west is Exits 3B-A, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway. The left three lanes continue west on Interstate 10 to Santa Monica. Photo taken 08/26/07.
After the offramp to Overland Avenue, Interstate 10 goes below grade to pass under Overland Avenue and National Boulevard. Photo taken 08/26/07.
An exit number sign for Exit 3B, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway south to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and Long Beach is partially hidden by roadside shrubs. Photo taken 08/26/07.
The right lane becomes exit only for Exit 3B, Junction Interstate 405 south to LAX, Long Beach, Irvine, and San Diego. The #3 and #4 lanes connect to Exit 3A, Interstate 405 north to Interstate 5 north to Santa Clarita, Sacramento, and San Francisco. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway reaches Exit 3B, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway south to LAX and Long Beach. The next exit is Exit 3A, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway north to Sacramento. Photo taken 08/26/07.
Immediately thereafter, an exit number sign for Exit 3A, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway north to Santa Clarita and Sacramento is posted shortly after the Exit 3B offramp. This interchange is known as the Marilyn Jorgenson Reece Memorial Interchange, named after the first female engineer to design a freeway interchange in California in 1962 (the interchange opened in 1964). Photo taken 08/26/07.
The left three lanes continue west on Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway, while the right two lanes connect to Exit 3A, Junction Interstate 405/San Diego Freeway north to Santa Clarita and Sacramento. Photo taken 08/26/07.
A Route 10/405 Separation bridge log sign is posted prior to the Interstate 10 bridge over the Interstate 405 main line. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Looking north and down onto Interstate 405, the north-south freeway is busy as usual. Photo taken 08/24/04.
Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Christopher Columbus Transcontinental) Freeway west
The ramp connecting Interstate 10 east with Interstate 405 north flies over the westbound main lanes of Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway. Photo taken 04/21/07.
The next four exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west are Exits 2C-B, Bundy Drive; Exit 2A, Centinela Avenue; and Exit 1C, Cloverfield Boulevard and 26th Street. Photo taken 04/21/07.
A roadside exit number sign for the next two exits along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west (Exits 2C-B, Bundy Drive north and south) is posted shortly thereafter. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Bundy Drive travels north through the Sawtelle neighborhood of Los Angeles into the Brentwood neighborhood. Photo taken 11/22/07.
To the Santa Monica Airport, use Centinela Avenue south (Exit 2A). Photo taken 11/22/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 2C, Bundy Drive north. The next exit is Exit 2B, Bundy Drive south. Photo taken 04/21/07.
An unusual gore point sign for Exits 2C and 2B is posted at the offramp to Exit 2C, Bundy Drive north. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Immediately thereafter, westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 2B, Bundy Drive south. Photo taken 04/21/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway is Exit 2A, Centinela Avenue south to Santa Monica Airport. A mileage sign for the next two exits (Exit 2A, Centinela Avenue; and Exit 1C, Cloverfield Boulevard and 26th Street) is posted nearby. Photo taken 08/24/04.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 2A, Centinela Avenue. At this point, Interstate 10 leaves the city of Los Angeles and enters the city of Santa Monica, the final destination for transcontinental Interstate 10. Only two miles of freeway remain before Interstate 10 meets the Pacific Coast Highway near the McClure Tunnel. Santa Monica had a population of 84,084 people as of the 2000 Census and was incorporated on November 30, 1886. The city is a well-known tourist destination with the famous Santa Monica Pier, Palisades Park on a coastal bluff, the west end of Historic U.S. 66 at the intersection of Lincoln Boulevard and Olympic Boulevard (near today's Interstate 10 and California 1 interchange), and shopping at the Third Street Promenade. Photo taken 04/21/07.
The next exit along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west is Exit 1C, Cloverfield Boulevard south and 26th Street north. Photo taken 04/21/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the final exits from Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west: Exit 1C, Cloverfield Boulevard south and 26th Street north; Exit 1B, Junction California 1/Lincoln Boulevard south and Lincoln Boulevard north to California 2; and Exit 1A, Fourth Street and Fifth Street to downtown Santa Monica. After Exit 1A, traffic from California 1 north merges onto the freeway, and Interstate 10 comes to an end at that point. California 1/Pacific Coast Highway proceeds north to Malibu. Photo taken 11/22/07.
This Interstate 10 west reassurance shield is posted after the onramp from Centinela Avenue. Photo taken 04/21/07.
The right two lanes of Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west connect to Exit 1C, Cloverfield Boulevard south and 26th Street north. The left three lanes continue west on Interstate 10. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Westbound Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway reaches Exit 1C, Cloverfield Boulevard south and 26th Street north. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Looking at the offramp to Exit 1C (Cloverfield Boulevard south and 26th Street north), the 2004 photo shows the odd diagrammatical sign that was previously in use. The 2007 photo shows the simpler version currently in use. Photos taken 04/21/07 and 08/24/04.
The next exit along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west is Exit 1B, Junction California 1/Lincoln Boulevard south to Venice Beach, Marina del Rey, and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). The left two lanes default onto California 1/Pacific Coast Highway north to Malibu. Photo taken 04/21/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the final two exits on Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west (Exit 1B, Junction California 1/Lincoln Boulevard south and Lincoln Boulevard north to California 2 and Exit 1A, Fourth Street and Fifth Street to downtown Santa Monica) as well as the first exit from California 1/Pacific Coast Highway north (to Chautauqua Boulevard). Photo taken 11/22/07.
Interstate 10 makes a gentle turn on its final approach to the California 1/Pacific Coast Highway interchange (Exits 1B-A). Photo taken 11/22/07.
Truck restrictions were enforced along California 1/Pacific Coast Highway west of California 27/Topanga Canyon Road in Malibu at the time this photo was taken. Photo taken 08/24/04.
After the onramp from 20th Street (no direct access to 20th Street from Interstate 10 westbound), a final Interstate 10 west reassurance shield is posted. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Use California 1/Lincoln Boulevard south to Venice Beach, Marina del Rey, and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). To the north, Lincoln Boulevard immediately intersects Olympic Boulevard. The historic western end of U.S. 66 is at this intersection (not at the Santa Monica Pier, contrary to some U.S. 66 webpages). California 2, which used to follow the route of U.S. 66 through Santa Monica, was decommissioned to city maintenance, and thus is not signed from Interstate 10 west. However, signage for California 2 west is found on the city streets. Photo taken 04/21/07.
The right lane of Interstate 10 west becomes exit only for Exit 1B, Junction California 1/Lincoln Boulevard south and Lincoln Boulevard north to California 2 and U.S. 66. California 2 is a fairly significant route that extends from Santa Monica west through Beverly Hills and West Hollywood to merge briefly with U.S. 101/Hollywood Freeway near Hollywood. California 2 splits north through Echo Park and Silver Lake to merge onto the Glendale Freeway toward Glendale and La Canada-Flintridge. After crossing Interstate 210, California 2 becomes the Angeles Crest Highway and travels northeast through the scenic Angeles National Forest as a two-lane scenic highway. Ultimately California 2 ends at its intersection with California 138. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Westbound Interstate 10 reaches Exit 1B, Junction California 1/Lincoln Boulevard south to Venice Beach, Marina del Rey, and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and Lincoln Boulevard north to U.S. 66 and California 2. U.S. 66 generally follows the path of California 2 east to U.S. 101, then follows its own path around the edge of downtown Los Angeles, then aims northeast toward Pasadena along the California 110 corridor. At Pasadena, U.S. 66 turns east to follow Interstate 210/Foothill Freeway toward Pasadena, then turns north along the Interstate 15 (and former U.S. 91-395) corridor toward Barstow. At Barstow, U.S. 66 follows Interstate 40 east toward Needles, Flagstaff, Albuquerque, Amarillo, and Oklahoma City before turning northeast toward its eastern terminus in Chicago. Photo taken 11/22/07.
The final exit along Interstate 10/Santa Monica Freeway west is Exit 1A, Fourth Street and Fifth Street. Use Exit 1A to the world-famous Santa Monica Pier, Third Street Promenade, Palisades Park, and downtown Santa Monica. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Use Fifth Street north to Third Street Promenade and downtown Santa Monica. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Westbound Interstate 10 reaches Exit 1A, Fourth Street and Fifth Street to downtown Santa Monica. The left two lanes will connect onto California 1/Pacific Coast Highway north to Malibu and Oxnard. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Upon exiting, use the left lane to connect to Fourth Street and the right lane to connect to Fifth Street. The overpass ahead carries California 1 traffic from Lincoln Boulevard onto Interstate 10. Photos taken 04/21/07.
At the top of the offramp to Fourth Street and Fifth Street is a list of attractions on a blue guide sign placed by the city to help visitors find the Santa Monica Pier, Third Street Promenade, Palisades Park, downtown Santa Monica, and places to park. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Stay left to connect to Fourth Street; the right two lanes lead directly onto Fifth Street. Another blue wayfinder sign is posted at the gore point. Photo taken 04/21/07.
Back on the mainline, traffic from California 1/Lincoln Boulevard prepares to merge onto Interstate 10 west. The merge point is the western end of Interstate 10. Photo taken 08/24/04.
Interstate 10 ends as traffic from California 1 north merges onto the freeway. Yellow signs indicating cross traffic ahead are the only indication that Interstate 10 has ended, as there are no END FREEWAY signs or END Interstate 10 shield assemblies. Photo taken 11/22/07.
California 1/Pacific Coast Highway north
Even though Interstate 10/Santa Monica (Christopher Columbus Transcontinental) Freeway has come to its end, it is almost unfair to get this close to the ocean and not see any water. So, we'll take you through the next mile or so of California 1/Pacific Coast Highway to the Santa Monica beaches. California 1 only carries two lanes in each direction with a single jersey barrier median as it travels below-grade. Main Street passes overhead on an old concrete arch bridge built in 1925 as an overpass to Olympic Boulevard (which preceded California 1 along this stretch). Photo taken 11/22/07.
A yellow Holiday Inn hotel comes into view on the north side of the highway. The McClure Tunnel, which carries traffic under the Palisades, will bring the ocean into view for the first time in Santa Monica. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Built between 1935 and 1939 as part of Alternate U.S. 101, the Robert E. McClure (Palisades) Tunnel is a historic resource in the greater Los Angeles transportation network. The tunnel is not wide enough to meet Interstate standards and thus is not a part of Interstate 10. However, it is part of a dramatic and fitting end to a long Interstate highway. Photo taken 11/22/07.
After passing through the Palisades, the McClure Tunnel brings California 1 motorists to the beach in Santa Monica. Photo taken 11/22/07.
California 1 turns from west to north to parallel the beach on the west and the Palisades to the east. An onramp will join the Pacific Coast Highway from the right. Photo taken 11/22/07.
The first California 1 north reassurance shield is posted after the merge point. Several pedestrian bridges cross over the Pacific Coast Highway to facilitate pedestrian movements across the very busy roadway. During peak beach hours, this section of highway can be severely congested. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Several houses line the west side of California 1, and the Palisades line the east side as a pedestrian bridge crosses the highway. Photo taken 11/22/07.
Interstate 10 ends Back to Interstate 10 Index Return to the California Gateway

Page Updated October 30, 2008.