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 1 
 on: Today at 04:47:17 AM 
Started by Takumi - Last post by on_wisconsin
Bu-Bump...

Anyone try any good pumpkin beers this year? I usually get New Belgium's PumpKick and Blue Moon's Pumpkin.

 2 
 on: Today at 03:45:49 AM 
Started by Roadgeekteen - Last post by on_wisconsin
PSvue (no Playstation needed), Netflix, Prime, and OTA.

 3 
 on: Today at 03:31:21 AM 
Started by Brandon - Last post by Bickendan
San Jose, CA, on I-880 Southbound (sign goofs, to be honest though)

Brokaw Road, exit 4B and exit 5
First Street, exit 4A and exit 389
The Alameda, exit 1D and exit 2
That 389 probably is... but I think the others have to do with CalTrans putting the exit number divisions at the .5 mile (Exit 1 is MP 0-1.5, 2 is 1.5-2.5, 3 is 2.5-3.5, etc), so the exit midpoints might fall on the divisions.

 4 
 on: Today at 01:19:40 AM 
Started by bandit957 - Last post by jakeroot
At my high school people chewed on used cars.

You a giant?
No. Don't believe he ever played for them. :bigass:

No, like a giant person.

https://i.imgur.com/9nohQh4.jpg

I understood the joke.

You need to use an emoticon (like freebrickproductions used) if you're going to be sarcastic. It's nearly impossible to sense sarcasm online.

I use </s>

I just use /s.

Don't you mean, "I will use /s"?

/s

 5 
 on: Today at 01:12:45 AM 
Started by ParrDa - Last post by jakeroot
Note that I said "perhaps". I wasn't envisioning every scenario involving gesturing and horn-blaring. Even if someone was following close (no headlights visible seems very reasonable to me), I'd consider that to be a mild display of anger/rage. I'd still move over as quickly as possible. Here in Seattle, the standard rush-hour following distance (when travelling between 45 and 65 mph) is about .5 to 1 second...maybe? If someone gets closer than that, they clearly are in a rush and I see no reason to get in their way. I'd signal right, wait for a gap, and then move over (I wouldn't cram in). On a two-lane road, I'd definitely pull off into the shoulder. The longer they have to wait behind me, the angrier they'll probably get.

See, I don't necessarily think of tailgating as a sign of anger. I mean, sure, if you did something to obstruct flow first, or if they continue getting closer or do it for a long time, then it becomes obvious. But I wouldn't move over just for them the second they get too close, I would finish passing. Though I do agree that they'll probably become more angry over time, that's their problem, and I'll usually find a gap in traffic in the next lane over within a mile or so anyways (unless there's congestion, which stands alone IMO).

I wouldn't change lanes within seconds of them approaching me. I'm extremely observant, but even I will wait a couple seconds before determining whether or not they are just being light on the brakes (using just enough brakes to not hit me, but not enough to maintain a reasonable following distance). When braking (since I drive a 6-speed), I will downshift when I see cars slowing in front of me. I will only use the brakes if my downshift doesn't provide enough braking power to keep from getting really close. Sometimes I get really close when doing this, close enough that I can sense the annoyance of the driver in front of me. I usually back off quickly to keep them from attempting to brake-check me.

 6 
 on: Today at 01:06:53 AM 
Started by capt.ron - Last post by jakeroot
As I went from elementary school into junior high (please don't call it "middle school")

My understanding is that middle schools and junior highs encompass different grade divisions. I'm not sure what the breakdown is for each specific term, but in one of those categories, ninth graders (freshmen) go to that school and not the high school, which is for the top three grades. The other doesn't contain ninth graders, and all four years go to high school.

I went to something called an "upper elementary," which was some sort of newfangled term used in the early 70s for a school encompassing sixth through eighth grades.

I thought middle school and junior high school were the same thing: 6th to 8th grade. I went to Cline Middle School (a public school) in the mid-'80s, which included 6th to 8th. Then I went to a Catholic school that had 1st to 8th, but they kept insisting middle school only included 7th to 8th. (That's not surprising, since I learned some coursework in public school in 6th grade that the Catholic high school taught again when I was a sophomore, since the parochial schools are so far behind.) I don't remember whether this school called it middle school or junior high.

In my area (Western Washington), the junior highs are 7-9, and the middle schools are 6-8. I went to a "junior high" but often refer to it as "middle school" when speaking retrospectively, since most districts around me used the term "middle school".

There are also some primary schools and intermediate schools. I'm not sure which grades these encompass, but I believe primary is K-3, and intermediate is 4-6. These districts seem to use junior highs (7-9). There is also at least one "secondary" school, but I can't remember where.

British Columbia uses primary/elementary, middle, and secondary (not "high school"). Fun fact: Seth Rogen and best-bud Evan Goldberg attended Point Grey Secondary (south of Vancouver).

 7 
 on: Today at 12:58:42 AM 
Started by ParrDa - Last post by ParrDa
Note that I said "perhaps". I wasn't envisioning every scenario involving gesturing and horn-blaring. Even if someone was following close (no headlights visible seems very reasonable to me), I'd consider that to be a mild display of anger/rage. I'd still move over as quickly as possible. Here in Seattle, the standard rush-hour following distance (when travelling between 45 and 65 mph) is about .5 to 1 second...maybe? If someone gets closer than that, they clearly are in a rush and I see no reason to get in their way. I'd signal right, wait for a gap, and then move over (I wouldn't cram in). On a two-lane road, I'd definitely pull off into the shoulder. The longer they have to wait behind me, the angrier they'll probably get.

See, I don't necessarily think of tailgating as a sign of anger. I mean, sure, if you did something to obstruct flow first, or if they continue getting closer or do it for a long time, then it becomes obvious. But I wouldn't move over just for them the second they get too close, I would finish passing. Though I do agree that they'll probably become more angry over time, that's their problem, and I'll usually find a gap in traffic in the next lane over within a mile or so anyways (unless there's congestion, which stands alone IMO).

Quote
Thank fuck! The number of people who feel their own speed is suddenly the maximum limit is alarming. I see it all the time, even in my parents (who drive just as fast as I do (usually 10-15 over on the freeways)). I try to tell them, but they always respond with the same "I think XX is fast enough". Total bullshit.

To this point, I totally agree. If it wasn't for those folks, those of us who aren't afraid to move fast could do so more consistently and increase the throughput of the whole system. It really is rare that I come across someone who wants to go significantly faster than me, but when it does happen, it's not worth batting an eyelash IMO, much less messing with them/braking and trying to control them. Let them get the ticket, and/or jump on the bandwagon.

Around here the "fast" drivers, me included, usually max out at around 80 mph, no matter the limit. So what I will sometimes do (say, if I'm already passing with open road in front of me) is speed up for a minute to around 80/85 see how fast the person approaching is prepared to go. A few times I've had a whole string of cars decide to keep up with me. Every time I move right, they follow suit, despite an opportunity to pass. I really enjoy that feeling of being a trend-setter on the road  :sombrero:

Quote
I pretty much drive the same as you. I always let faster drivers by, stay right when possible, don't get angry at people driving faster than me, etc. Self-righteousness is a terrible trait for a driver.

After all our back-and-forth, I'll take that as a compliment.
I wouldn't say that I'm not self-righteous, exactly. I mean, I know I'm doing the right thing, and everyone else just thinks they are  :-D But as far as using your power to make others to conform to your standard, I agree that is definitely not a wise/appropriate thing to do on the road. Period.

 8 
 on: Today at 12:54:58 AM 
Started by ParrDa - Last post by jakeroot
For those who say "get out of the tailgater's way," do you feel that way even when it's happening in the far right lane? People around here will tailgate in every lane at any time. I certainly feel no obligation whatsoever to speed up or move out of the way if I'm in the far right lane (I do try to move left to accommodate traffic entering the highway, but that's a separate situation.....and there are people around here who will cut over to the right into the acceleration lane to pass).

Unlike most people, I prefer to diffuse situations, instead of exacerbating them. In the case of someone tailgating in the right lane, I would make every attempt to get out of their way. Either by speeding up to allow them to change lanes, pulling into the shoulder, etc. If someone is tailgating in the right lane, they must be desperate. I see no reason to get in their way.

On this, we agree. Tailgating in the right lane is rare enough in my area that I'd presume they're either irate or in an emergency.

See, people here tailgate everywhere. Last night someone was riding my rear bumper in the Metro parking garage. I wasn't crawling, but I don't speed through parking either because of cars suddenly backing out without looking, pedestrians appearing from between big SUVs, etc.

If you go 65 mph in the right lane on the Beltway (speed limit is 55), usually someone will come up close behind you. If that happens to me, I won't move. There are three other lanes to the left.

Just to clarify, if they come up on you in the right lane, and get close enough that the headlamps aren't visible, you won't do anything to try and change things? I also don't like people riding my bumper. But, unlike a lot of people it would seem, I actually try and do things to get them off my bumper. Brake-checking is dumb because you're likely to cause an accident. I'd change lanes and just let them by. Especially if there were two or three packed lanes to my left (i.e. they are attempting to pass on the right).

 9 
 on: Today at 12:46:00 AM 
Started by Mergingtraffic - Last post by RobbieL2415
Congressman Larson (District 1) is still trying to push his Big Dig project for Hartford. :ded:

http://www.courant.com/business/dan-haar/hc-pol-haar-larson-tunnel-project-bocce-shuster-20170915-story.html

 10 
 on: Today at 12:35:18 AM 
Started by bandit957 - Last post by jakeroot
I worked with someone from rural Michigan who...frequently said "I seen" rather than "I saw."

I wondered if it was regional, or if it was an affectation....

Were they African American? In my experience, "I seen" is a common "ebonic" variation of "I saw". Not the case in the South, where whites and blacks seem to share many of the same linguistic characteristics, but perhaps in Michigan. Not sure how strong the Michigan accent is among the white population up there.

No, he was white/Caucasian.

Hmmm. Did he have a speech impediment? (i.e. did he cock up other words too? Other than the aforementioned use of "buyed").

He did indeed conjugate many words differently than "standard" American English, but it definitely seemed to be usage and not a speech impediment: past tense verbs, usually if not always first-person, both singular and plural.

FWIW, he described himself as having been raised in a very rural area of the UP. (As a Texan who has not yet had the pleasure of visiting, I don't really see any "citified" areas of the UP on the map....)

Most of the remaining "unique" accents in this country seem to be in areas with little outside contact. I'm sure certain villages in the Upper Peninsula would qualify. A more famous example might be the High Tider accent spoken in some of the isolated coastal North Carolina communities.


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