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Interstate 8 Westbound - Yuma County

Interstate 8 west
Welcome to Yuma County. The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Spot Road (Exit 78). A joke could be made about "See Spot Road" (as opposed to "See Spot Run" found in many children's books) but we won't make it here. Anyway, this interchange also serves local traffic and connects to Stanwix via dirt roads (including extant sections of Old U.S. 80). Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 78, Spot Road to Stanwix. No services are available at this interchange. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 73, Aztec Road. No services are available here, but again, some minor sections of old U.S. 80 can be found on the north side of Interstate 8. Aztec is another ghost town along the Interstate 8 corridor. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 73, Aztec Road. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A reassurance shield for Interstate 8 is posted after the Aztec interchange. Two signs advise of coming gas stations - one at Exit 42 and the other at the next exit (Dateland, Exit 54). Photo taken 03/19/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to Dateland (five miles), Rest Area (16 miles), and San Diego (249 miles) after the Aztec Road interchange. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Continuing west, Interstate 8 travels through some desolate yet gorgeous country as it parallels the Gila River. The Mohawk Mountains can be seen in the distance catching the morning sun rays. This day was an unusually hot day for March - well into the 90s - but temperatures can swell into the 100s-110s range during June, July, and August (hot summer months). It is hard to comprehend making this drive on Interstate 8 during these three months at any time during the day without air conditioning and related creature comforts; however, many travelers on U.S. 80 used to make this trip without air conditioning back when the federal route was first commissioned through this region. Photo taken 03/19/07.

The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 67, Avenue 64E to Dateland. In Yuma County, the county road numbering system is based on mileage from the western end of the county. Hence, Avenue 64E is approximately 64 miles from Yuma in the western end of the county and is fairly close to the total mileage of Interstate 8 left in Arizona (67 miles - the difference is mostly due to the short north-south segment of Interstate 8 as it passes through metropolitan Yuma-Winterhaven). Photo taken 12/31/69.
Dateland is perhaps most famous for its Medjool Dates, but it was also one of General George S. Patton's training camps. Airstrips and related facilities from World War II are still present but are generally no longer in use. To the south is the Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range, which continues west almost to Yuma. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 67, Avenue 64E and Dateland. Agriculture is a major component of the local economy, with dates, citrus, and a dairy located in and around Dateland. Irrigated areas become more common, especially after crossing the Mohawk Mountains after Exit 54. Finally, as mentioned earlier, date shakes are popular and can be purchased at the service station on the south side of the freeway -- they can be refreshing on a hot summer's day. Photo taken 03/19/07.
After the Dateland interchange, this mileage sign provides the distance to the next Rest Area (10 miles), Yuma (66 miles), and San Diego (242 miles). Photo taken 03/19/07.
With the Mohawk Mountains in the background, Interstate 8 turns to the west. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A U.S. Border Patrol Checkpoint was active on this day around Milepost 62 for eastbound (not westbound) traffic. The exact location of federal checkpoints vary along the route of Interstate 8. Photo taken 03/19/07.
This rocky outcropping appears on the north side of Interstate 8 as the freeway continues to approach the Mohawk Mountains. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit is Exit 55, Mohawk Rest Area. This rest area is only 29 miles west of the last rest area near Sentinel, but the next rest area is some 73 miles west of here in California. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Restrooms, vending machines, and water are available at this rest area, which is the last one on Interstate 8 west in Arizona (excluding the tourist information center and chamber of commerce in Yuma at Exit 1/Giss Parkway). The next rest area is located in the Imperial Sand Dunes in California after Exit 154, Grays Well Road. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 55, Mohawk Rest Area. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 54, Junction Old U.S. 80 and Avenue 52E to Mohawk Valley. From Exit 54 west to Dome Valley, old U.S. 80 is an extant paved highway. U.S. 80 parallels Interstate 8 on the north side of the freeway, then merges in with Interstate 8 over the Gila Mountains. A possible older alignment of U.S. 80 may have avoided the Gila Mountains crossing by turning northwest along with the Gila River to meet U.S. 95 near the old McPhaul Suspension Bridge. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 approaches Exit 54, Junction Old U.S. 80 and Avenue 52E to Mohawk Valley. Old U.S. 80 parallels the freeway as a service road starting at Exit 54 and continuing west to Exit 21 near Ligurta. From Ligurta/Dome Valley, the old road turns northwest along the Gila River briefly away from Interstate 8 to meet U.S. 95. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Continuing west, Interstate 8 and Old U.S. 80 split at Exit 54. This exit also serves north-south Avenue 52E, which travels north toward the Gila River. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Crossing over Avenue 52E, Interstate 8 begins to climb the Mohawk Mountains. Although not very tall or wide, the Mohawk Mountains offer a variation on the landscape for the first time in many miles. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A reassurance shield is posted on westbound Interstate 8 as the freeway ascends the Mohawk Mountains after Exit 54, Avenue 52E and Junction Old U.S. 80. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Nearing the top of the Mohawk Mountains is this mileage sign on westbound Interstate 8, which provides the distance to Tacna (10 miles), Yuma (53 miles), and San Diego (230 miles). Photo taken 03/19/07.
After crossing the Mohawk Mountains and the low-rise pass, Interstate 8 again enters flat desert. This is the Dome Valley, some of which is agricultural and heavily irrigated. Annual rainfall is very limited in this arid part of Arizona. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 42, Avenue 40E and Tacna. The use of numbered/lettered county road designations is common in Yuma County, the most southwesterly county in the state of Arizona, with the roadway grid centered in Yuma near the California-Arizona State Line. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Use Avenue 40E north to Old U.S. 80, which parallels Interstate 8 to the north. Gas, food, and lodging are available in the town of Tacna, which is home to 555 residents as of the 2000 Census. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 meets Avenue 40E, which travels north to Old U.S. 80 and the town of Tacna. Photo taken 03/19/07.
This reassurance shield is posted on westbound Interstate 8 after the Tacna interchange (Exit 42). Photo taken 03/19/07.
This mileage sign on westbound Interstate 8 provides the distance to Exit 37, Avenue 36E (3 miles); Yuma (40 miles); and San Diego (217 miles). Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 37, Avenue 36E to Roll. Much of Interstate 8 is paralleled to the south by the Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range, so it is possible to spot military planes in the vicinity. The railroad and Gila River are to the north of the freeway. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Roll is another settlement along the old road, but it is located on the north bank of the Gila River, unlike Tacna, which is on the south bank. Of course, the banks of the Gila River can vary depending upon how much water is in it; during the dry thirsty months, the river can reduce into a trickle, but in wet months, it can be a raging river. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 37, Avenue 36E north to Roll. Photo taken 03/19/07.
This reassurance shield is posted on westbound Interstate 8 after the Roll interchange (Exit 37). Photo taken 03/19/07.
Continuing west, this mileage sign provides the distance to the next interchange (Exit 30, Wellton), Yuma (36 miles), and San Diego (213 miles). Photo taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 west crosses over the Mohawk Canal, which provides irrigation water to the farms, dairies, and other agricultural facilities scattered throughout the valley. A very large dairy ranch with herds of cattle can be seen on the north side of Interstate 8 off of Old U.S. 80. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A wide bridge carries Avenue 33E over Interstate 8 and the Union Pacific Railroad (formerly Southern Pacific Railroad) near Milepost 35. Eight sets of supports carries the bridge over the freeway. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The Gila Mountains come into view as Interstate 8 approaches Exit 30, Avenue 29E to Wellton. Photo taken 03/19/07.
All motorist services -- gas, food, lodging, and camping -- are available in Wellton at Exit 30. Wellton was founded in 1878 and incorporated as a town in 1970. Wellton is named for the wells drilled by the Southern Pacific Railroad in search of water (hence the origin of the name "Well Town"). Agriculture, retired seasonal long-term visitors, and through travelers keep the economy of the region growing. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Another canal passes under Interstate 8: the Wellton Canal (managed by the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation And Drainage District [WMIDD]) serves various farms and ranches in the Dome Valley-Wellton area. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Use Avenue 30E north to Old U.S. 80 in Wellton. Home to 1,829 people as of the 2000 Census, the population has increased only slightly as of 2006 population estimates. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 meets Avenue 30E at Exit 30, which serves the town of Wellton (the largest town in the valley). Wellton sits along the Coyote Wash. Limited development of this area is expected due to limited infrastructure and employment opportunities. This makes the region more appealing for those seeking to live outside of the city and urbanized areas while still having easy access to the urban amenities of Yuma. No services are available on Interstate 8 west for 18 miles until Exit 12 on the outskirts of Yuma. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 passes under Avenue 30E. Note the large pillar in the center of the overpass. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A reassurance shield for Interstate 8 west is posted after the Avenue 30E (Wellton) interchange. Photo taken 03/19/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to Dome Valley (9 miles), Yuma (29 miles), and San Diego (206 miles). Photo taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 west crosses over Avenue 25E with no access. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A fairly long bridge carries Interstate 8 over the Ligurta Wash west of Wellton and east of Dome Valley. Photos taken 03/19/07.
A parking area is located near Milepost 23. While it has no facilities, it is accessible for the disabled. Photos taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 crosses over Red Top Wash. A power substation is located on the north side of the freeway. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Exit here for the parking area. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit on westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 21, Dome Valley. This is the last exit before the freeway ascends and crosses the Gila Mountains. After that, the freeway descends into the Colorado River valley, entering Yuma before crossing the river into California. Use this exit to Ligurta and U.S. 95 via the Gila River valley. Photo taken 03/19/07.
There are no services at Exit 21, Dome Valley. The interchange is somewhat different due to the topography of the area as Interstate 8 prepares to cross the Gila Mountains. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Prior to Exit 21, the speed limit on westbound Interstate 8 drops to 65 miles per hour. This reduced speed limit is in effective for the remainder of the route through Arizona. In California, Interstate 8 will see an increased speed limit of 70 miles per hour upon crossing the Colorado River and passing by the Business Loop I-8/Winterhaven interchange. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 21, Dome Valley, the last exit before the Gila Mountains. At Dome Valley, it is possible that the original U.S. 80 turned northeast to meet U.S. 95, but the 1928 and 1950 versions of U.S. 80 followed Interstate 8 over the Gila Mountains. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Slow vehicles such as trucks lumber up the sharp ascent for the next two miles. Interstate 8 crosses the Gila Mountains, and the incline requires a brief crossover between eastbound and westbound carriageways. This results in a short distance where the westbound lanes are on the left hand side rather than the right hand side. Another instance of this occurs on Interstate 5 north of Los Angeles en route to the Central Valley. This kind of crossover makes the grade (elevation increase) smoother and not exceed a maximum of six percent. Photo taken 03/19/07.
A reassurance shield for Interstate 8 is posted as the freeway climbs the east face of the Gila Mountains. Photo taken 03/19/07.
To allow for a smooth grade up the Gila Mountains, Interstate 8 west crosses over the eastbound lanes. Photos taken 03/19/07.
This mileage sign provides the distance to Exit 14, Foothills Parkway; Yuma (19 miles), and San Diego (196 miles). It is located on the upslope as the freeway ascends the Gila Mountains. Photo taken 03/19/07.

Interstate 8 replaced U.S. 80 through Telegraph Pass, which enables the freeway to cross the Gila Mountains. Telegraph Pass is unusual for the "wrong-way alignment," where the westbound lanes cross over the eastbound lanes, leading to a reversal of the lane order. This was done due to terrain issues through the pass. The present-day eastbound lanes follow the later (1948) alignment of U.S. 80, while the westbound lanes cut across the original 1928 alignment of U.S. 80, as seen on the map above.

This suite of photos follows Interstate 8 as it winds its way up and over the Gila Mountains through Telegraph Pass. The westbound lanes follow a 1948 realignment of U.S. 80, while the eastbound lanes follow the original 1928 alignment of U.S. 80. Photos taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 crosses over itself again, with the eastbound lanes again crossing beneath the westbound lanes. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Continuing west, Interstate 8 again follows separate carriageways for the westbound and eastbound directions. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Descending into the Colorado River Valley, the city of Yuma spreads out. This rapidly growing area is very popular with "snowbirds," who are seasonal residents who leave the snowy northern states for a winter in sunny and warm Arizona. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 14, Foothills Boulevard, one mile. Now the freeway has crossed the Yuma Mountains, it is a relatively flat ride from here west to the Colorado River. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Foothills Boulevard is the first exit that leads into the general Yuma vicinity, but the main exit is the business route (Exit 9). March is a prime month for seasonal visitors; during this trip, traffic was rather heavy between Exits 14 and 1 through metropolitan Yuma. Someday Interstate 8 will have to be widened to accommodate the growing traffic needs of the city. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 14, Foothills Boulevard. The Foothills is a settlement located south of the freeway; it is not on the old alignment of U.S. 80. Photo taken 03/19/07.
This reassurance shield for Interstate 8 is posted after the Foothills Parkway interchange. Note the residential development located on the north side of the freeway that was not there all that long ago. Yuma is growing to where it covers everything between the Gila Mountains and the Colorado River. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 12, Fortuna Road (to U.S. 95 north). For westbound travelers looking to take U.S. 95 north to Quartzsite, Interstate 10, Las Vegas, or Los Angeles, Exit 12 is the best connection to the federal route. This short county road takes travelers due north from the freeway, and it eliminates backtracking. Between Exits 13 and 2, U.S. 95 parallels Interstate 8 in an east-west direction on a fairly busy, four-lane highway through farmland and growing suburban areas. U.S. 95 does not turn south again until after passing through the city center of Yuma. Notably, the interchange with Interstate 8 (Exit 2) is odd because U.S. 95 travels east-west and Interstate 8 travels north-south. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Use Fortuna Road north to U.S. 95 north for the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Grounds, old McPhaul Suspension Bridge, Kofa Mountains National Wildlife Refuge, and the city of Quartzsite on Interstate 10. A border-to-border route, U.S. 95 originates at the international border with Mexico at San Luis, Arizona, and it extends north all the way to Canada. It passes through Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, and Idaho on its journey north. Photo taken 03/19/07.
This mileage sign on westbound Interstate 8 provides the distance to the next three exits: Exit 12, Fortuna Road north to U.S. 95 north to Quartzsite (one-half mile); Exit 9, Junction Business Loop I-8/Avenue 8 1/2 E; and Exit 7, Araby Road. Note the use of a business loop shield on the mileage sign, which is common in Arizona but rare if not nonexistent in California. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 12, Fortuna Road to U.S. 95. Continue west on Interstate 8 to Exit 2, Junction U.S. 95, to follow U.S. 95 south to San Luis and the state of Sonora in Mexico. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The first major Yuma exit along westbound is Exit 9, Junction Business Loop I-8 (two miles). The name, "Avenue 8 1/2 E," refers to the distance from downtown Yuma (Avenue 8 1/2E is 8 1/2 miles east of downtown Yuma). The importance of this exit is noted by the two-mile distance sign. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 approaches Exit 9, Junction Business Loop I-8 (one mile). Business Loop I-8 follows a later alignment of Old U.S. 80 into Yuma and does not rejoin Interstate 8 until the first interchange in Winterhaven, California (Exit 172). Business Loop I-8 follows 32nd Street west and 4th Avenue north through Yuma, crossing the Colorado River on its own bridge. Photo taken 03/19/07.
As is traditional in business route signage in Arizona, this sign reminds motorists that business route will lead to a variety of services, including gas, food, and lodging as well as camping. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Another mileage sign along westbound Interstate 8 provides the distance to the next three exits: Exit 9, Junction Business Loop I-8 and Avenue 8 1/2 E, one-half mile; Exit 7, Araby Road; and Exit 3, Junction Arizona 280 and Avenue 3E. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 9, Junction Business Loop I-8 and Avenue 8 1/2 E. Even though there are signs promising services in Yuma, not many are available at this interchange. Motorists have to drive into town to reach the services. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 west crosses over Business Loop I-8, which is identified as "Business 8" on this identification sign. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next five exits serve the city of Yuma: Exit 7, Araby Road; Exit 3, Junction Arizona 280 (Avenue 3E); Exit 2, Junction U.S. 95; Exit 1, Giss Parkway; and (in California) Exit 172, Junction Business Loop I-8 to Imperial County Route S-24 and Winterhaven. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 7, Araby Road. For a change, the county road is not numbered. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Araby Road connects to the suburban areas of eastern Yuma. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 meets Araby Road at Exit 7. Businesses, houses and residential areas are located on either side of the freeway, but a generous setback from the freeway will allow for future expansion of Interstate 8 if needed. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 enters the city of Yuma. The largest city in Yuma County, Yuma is a popular winter getaway for snowbirds (bringing in hundreds of millions of additional dollars to the local economy) and thrives due to its proximity to the international border with Mexico. As of the 2000 Census, 77,515 people reside in Yuma; that figure has grown to 88,775 as of a 2005 estimate. This does not include winter residents. Yuma is the 10th largest city in Arizona (as of 2006), in front of Surprise and before Peoria. Yuma has gone by other names in its history: from 1854 until 1858, Yuma was known as Colorado City and from 1858 until 1873, Yuma was known as Arizona City. In 1873, Yuma received its current name, which is in honor of the Native American inhabitants from this region. Incorporation occurred three times in Yuma's history: as a village on July 11, 1876; as a town on April 6, 1902; and as a city on April 7, 1914. Yuma sits at 138 feet above sea level, receives only 2.94 inches of rainfall annually, and the average year-round high temperature is over 87 degrees!1 Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next three exits on westbound Interstate 8 are Exit 3, Junction Arizona 280 (Avenue 3E); Exit 2, Junction U.S. 95 (16th Street); and Weigh Station. Not included in this list is the final Arizona interchange at Exit 1, Giss Parkway to downtown Yuma. Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound is Exit 3, Junction Arizona 280, which connects Interstate 8 with U.S. 95 to the north and Business Loop I-8 (old U.S. 80) near the Yuma International Airport to the south. The state route is a little over two miles long. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Arizona 280/Avenue 3E leads south to the Yuma International Airport, Yuma Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS), and the Yuma County Fairgrounds. Between 1976 and 1979, Arizona 280 was a connection between Interstate 8, which at that time ended here, and U.S. 80 (now Business Loop I-8). Photo taken 03/19/07.
Another mileage sign for the next three exits is posted here. As is common practice in Arizona, this highway number is a derivative of old U.S. 80. The business route was U.S. 80 for a time (even though an older alignment turned north at Dome Valley to meet U.S. 95), so the designation makes sense. Arizona 280 was added to the state highway system in 1976, when U.S. 80 still existed as a signed route this far west in Arizona. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 3, Junction Southbound Arizona 280 (Avenue 3E). Photo taken 03/19/07.
The next exit along westbound Interstate 8 is Exit 2, Junction U.S. 95 (16th Street), one mile. This is the only U.S. route interchange for the entire length of Interstate 8, creating what is probably the lowest Interstate mileage to U.S. route interchange ratio of anywhere in the country. There are no intersecting U.S. routes for Interstate 8 in California and none east of here on Interstate 8 either. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Use U.S. 95 north to Quartzsite and U.S. 95 south to San Luis and the Mexican state of Sonora. It would be clearer to include directional indicators on this sign (located along westbound Interstate 8) to clarify which towns are in which direction. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Passing under the Pacific Avenue overcrossing, westbound Interstate 8 approaches its junction with U.S. 95 in one-half mile. The last two exits after U.S. 95 are a weigh station (No Exit Number) and Giss Parkway (Exit 1). After that, the freeway crosses a bridge over the Colorado River into California. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 2, Junction U.S. 95 (16th Street) in Yuma. Most services are located at this interchange, including the last Cracker Barrel westbound (just before entering California). The final exit in Arizona is for Giss Parkway at Exit 1. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Ascending the ramp for Exit 2 (a diamond interchange), a left turn connects to U.S. 95 south to San Luis, while a right turn connects to U.S. 95 north to Quartzsite. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Passing under U.S. 95 (16th Street), Interstate 8 west next approaches the final Arizona weigh station and port of entry. Shortly thereafter is Exit 1, Giss Parkway. Photo taken 03/19/07.
After traffic merges onto westbound Interstate 8 after the U.S. 95 interchange, this roadside sign advises of the weigh station in one-half mile. Yes, that is a Circuit City on the north side of the freeway in Yuma - another piece of evidence that shows how much Yuma has grown. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches the weigh station exit, approaching Exit 1, Giss Parkway, three-quarters of a mile. This is the last weigh station along westbound in Arizona. Note the presence of oleander in the median; this is a plant commonly used in the medians of many freeways and expressways in California. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Giss Parkway is an east-west route that connects Interstate 8 with Business Loop I-8 on its way through downtown Yuma. This brown guide signage is for Yuma attractions found via the Giss Parkway exit. Attractions include historic downtown Yuma, Yuma Crossing, museums, and Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park are accessible via Exit 1. In addition, the Yuma Chamber of Commerce is located in downtown Yuma, and it functions as the de facto Arizona Welcome Center where free official state maps and tourist brochures may be obtained. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Westbound Interstate 8 reaches Exit 1, Giss Parkway, in Yuma. The next exit is Exit 172, Junction Business Loop I-8 to Imperial County Route S-24 and Winterhaven, California. No exit number has been posted for Exit 172, since this sign was put in place prior to the initiation of the California Exit Numbering System. Note the use of a business loop shield, which is standard for Arizona but would normally say "Route 8 Business Next Right" in California. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Sure enough, the next advance sign for Exit 172, Junction Business Loop I-8 features the California standard "Route 8 Business" (although missing is "Next Right"). This sign was fabricated to Arizona DOT specifications with a reflective background, but it has a California-standard design. Note the lack of exit numbers for Exit 172. This exit also serves Fort Yuma Indian Reservation and the Quechan Casino in Winterhaven. Use Business Loop I-8 west to Imperial County Route S-24 north to Imperial Dam. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Preparing to cross the Colorado River, this is the final Arizona DOT-placed mileage sign. Due to its position on the approach to the Colorado River Bridge along westbound, it is posted overhead. The three control points are Junction California 186 (8 miles), El Centro (58 miles), and San Diego (177 miles). This sign is Arizona-standard, with button copy lettering on a reflective background. Until the new exit number signs were erected in 2003, for a long time, this was the only green guide sign to feature a California 186 shield, even though it is located within Arizona. Since then, the California 186 interchange has at least two California 186 shields in each direction of Interstate 8 at the Andrade interchange. California 186 is significant because it travels south into Baja California, Mexico (rather than Sonora, Mexico, via U.S. 95 south). Photo taken 03/19/07.
Prior to crossing the Colorado River and entering California, this view along westbound Interstate 8 shows two old truss bridges that are just barely visible above the jersey barrier to the north and west of the Interstate 8 bridge. The southern bridge is the original, one-lane U.S. 80 crossing over the river, and the words "Ocean to Ocean Highway" and "Yuma" are written on the side of the bridge (see Historic U.S. 80 in California f Photo taken 12/31/69.
Crossing the Colorado River, Interstate 8 follows a concrete deck bridge (opened to traffic in 1979) with a curve to the southwest. The two steel through truss bridges can be seen to the north of the Interstate 8 bridge, and the Business Loop I-8 bridge between Yuma and Winterhaven can be seen to the south of the freeway. Photo taken 03/19/07.
Interstate 8 west leaves Arizona/Yuma County and enters California/Imperial County. Exit 172 (Junction Business Loop I-8 to Imperial County Route S-24) is the next exit. Photo taken 03/19/07.



Sources:

  1. Welcome to the City of Yuma, Arizona - official site contains an excellent statistics page that lists population, demographic, geographical, climatic, and other information about the city
Photo Credits:
2007-03-19 by AARoads

Connect with:
U.S. Highway 95

Page Updated 03-23-2007.

 
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