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U.S. Highway 93 North - Kingman to Hoover Dam

U.S. Highway 93 north
With U.S. 93 continuing north away from Interstate 40, this sign indicates that U.S. 93 heads to Las Vegas, with a connection to Arizona 68 en route to Bullhead City and Laughlin. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Mileage sign after leaving Kingman along northbound U.S. 93 for the junction with Arizona 68, Hoover Dam, and Las Vegas. Photo taken 10/24/03.
As noted on this variable message sign, all commercial traffic is prohibited from crossing Hoover Dam. This is a change, as trucks used to line up to cross the dam before the events of September 11, 2001. Now commercial traffic must use Arizona 68, Nevada 163, and U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Photo taken 10/24/03.
This U.S. 93 reassurance shield sits at Milepost 70 after the variable message sign. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Construction of the Hoover Dam Bypass, an arch bridge over the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, is currently underway. Completion is expected in 2007. Photo taken 10/24/03.
For a brief distance, from just north of Kingman until after the interchange with Arizona 68, U.S. 93 takes on characteristics of a freeway. The only exit on this freeway is Exit 67, Junction Arizona 68. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 approaching Exit 67, Junction Arizona 68 west, one-half mile. Since the mileposts for U.S. 93 decrease from south to north (contrary to most other north-south highways), this exit is 67 miles from the Arizona-Nevada state line, situated at Hoover Dam. Photo taken 10/24/03.

Commercial traffic must use Exit 67 as U.S. 93 is closed to trucks. As noted earlier, the detour route follows westbound Arizona 68 into Bullhead City, westbound Nevada 163 past Laughlin, and northbound U.S. 95 through Searchlight before rejoining U.S. 93 near Boulder City. This sign is a rare instance of one state's route marker (Nevada 163) being used on another state's signage (Arizona). Photo taken 10/24/03.
Arizona 68 is a fairly short route, connecting Kingman with Bullhead City/Laughlin via Golden Valley and Union Pass (elevation 3,625 feet). The highway remains four-lane divided for its entire length, meeting Arizona 95 just north of Bullhead City. It changes into the four-lane divided Nevada 163 upon crossing the Colorado River just south of Davis Dam. Nevada 163 joins U.S. 95 just north of the Nevada-California state line north of Needles. Through trucks may wish to use Interstate 40 rather than Arizona 68 to reach U.S. 95. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 at Exit 67, Junction Arizona 68. Photo taken 10/24/03.
All commercial vehicles must stop at the inspection station following the Arizona 68 interchange. This helps ensure that vehicles prohibited from crossing Hoover Dam are stopped and rerouted onto Interstate 40 or Arizona 68-Nevada 163-U.S. 95, as appropriate. This is also the port of entry for commercial traffic entering Arizona. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 approaching the inspection station, one-half mile. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 approaching Junction Mohave County Route 255/Mineral Park Road east, one-half mile. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 at Junction Mohave County Route 255/Mineral Park Road east. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 approaching Mohave County Route 125 east to Chloride, one-quarter mile. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 at Junction Mohave County Route 125 east to Chloride. This is also the location of the Arizona Welcome Center. Mohave County Route 125 is former Arizona 62, decomissioned in 1972. Photo taken 10/24/03.
The next major intersection along northbound U.S. 93 is its junction with Mohave County Route 25/Pierce Ferry Road (one mile). Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 approaching Junction Mohave County Route 25/Pierce Ferry Road, one-half mile. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Mohave County Route 25/Pierce Ferry Road heads north toward Dolan Springs, Meadview, and Southcove in a remote section of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 at Junction Mohave County Route 25/Pierce Ferry Road north. Photo taken 10/24/03.
U.S. 93 remains a divided highway from Kingman north to the boundary with Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Only 25 miles remain for U.S. 93 in Arizona, as attested by this milepost. Photo taken 10/24/03.
The last major county route intersection along northbound is at Junction Mohave County Route 143, which leads northeast to Temple Bar. Photo taken 10/24/03.
U.S. 93 changes from a divided highway to a two-lane highway upon reaching the boundary of the national recreation area. Some construction would be required to connect the four-lane Hoover Dam Bypass with the four-lane section that just ended. The two electricity transmission lines in the distance are on their way to the substations that surround Hoover Dam. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 enters Lake Mead National Recreation Area, which encompasses not only Lake Mead, but also the Black Canyon of the Colorado River and Lake Mohave to the south. Aside from Hoover Dam, there are no river crossings south until the Nevada 163/Arizona 68 crossing at Laughlin/Bullhead City. Headed north, the next Colorado River crossing is clear on the other side of the Grand Canyon, where Alternate U.S. 89 crosses the river at Marble Canyon. Photo taken 10/24/03.
This is the last shield along northbound U.S. 93 before reaching the dam. The divided highway ends, and the rest of the route to the dam is two lanes. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Scenic vista along northbound U.S. 93 in Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 approaching Willow Beach, which features a ranger station, picnic tables, and a boat launch. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Northbound U.S. 93 at the Willow Beach turnoff. Willow Beach is a part of the national recreation area. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Delays are probably more likely as a result of tourist traffic in the vicinity of Hoover Dam, but the construction of the Hoover Dam Bypass are also likely to result in delays, especially once the construction begins to connect the bypass with the existing highway. Photo taken 10/24/03.
All traffic must stop for the security checkpoint prior to reaching Hoover Dam. This security has been in place since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Now all major infrastructure facilities are held to a higher degree of security than previously. Photos taken 10/24/03.
Looking to the east while in line for the Hoover Dam inspection station, this bridge (the original 1936 routing, now-unused, for U.S. 93) is visible at the bottom of the hill. Photo taken 10/24/03.
The Arizona Approach to the Hoover Dam Bypass was under construction at the time this photo was taken. This new highway, coupled with a steel arch bridge over Black Canyon, will provide for a freeway bypass for traffic wishing to avoid the crowds and traffic at the dam site. Completion is expected in 2007. Photos taken 10/24/03.
Now entering the Hoover Dam area, traffic slows down dramatically. Pedestrians are quite common at the parking areas, turnouts, and sidewalks along and adjacent to the dam. The first view of the dam is at the next parking area (see next photobox). For dam tours, cross the dam and park on the Nevada side (there is a parking structure built into the canyon walls); the tours begin at the Visitors Center. Photo taken 12/31/69.
A turnout along U.S. 93 north provides stunning views of Lake Mead, Hoover Dam, and Black Canyon. U.S. 93 begins its descent to the top of the dam. Photo taken 10/24/03.
This view of Hoover Dam, as seen from U.S. 93 above the Black Canyon, shows the curved face of the concrete structure as well as the elevation difference between Lake Mead and the canyon downriver. Photo taken 10/24/03.
View of the gentle switchbacks that help U.S. 93 descend into the Black Canyon and prepare to cross Hoover Dam. The "bath tub ring" is immediately visible above Lake Mead in the above photograph; this is due to water levels that are lower than reservoir capacity. Photo taken 12/31/69.
Hoover Dam comes into view again with another turn along northbound. With its 17 electricity-producing turbines, the dam provides power to the states of Nevada and Arizona; the California cities of Los Angeles, Glendale, Burbank, Pasadena, Riverside, Azusa, Anaheim, Banning, Colton, and Vernon; the Southern California Edison Co.; The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California; and the city of Boulder City, Nevada. The power transmission system that crosses the three states moves electricity from the dam to its destinations. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Views of Lake Mead, Hoover Dam, and parking lots for visitors as seen from U.S. 93 northbound as it approaches the dam area. Hoover Dam holds back one of the largest reservoirs in the world: Lake Mead. The high-water line for Lake Mead, according to the Bureau of Reclamation, is 1,229 feet above sea level. At this elevation, the water would be more than seven and a half feet over the top of the raised spillway gates, which are at elevation 1,221.40 feet. Lake Mead covers a surface area of 247 square miles and rests in parts of southeastern Nevada and northwestern Arizona. Water from the reservoir is shared, in accordance with the Colorado River Compact by seven states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The Upper Basin States (north of Lees Ferry, which is along the Colorado River about 30 miles south of the Utah-Arizona state line) have a compact that allocates their share of the water (signed October 11, 1948); the Lower Basin States do not have such an agreement, but they abide by a Supreme Court ruling from October 1962. Mexico also has rights to some river water, in accordance with a treaty with the United States dated February 3, 1944. Photos taken 10/24/03.
Although this could be any typical two-lane road, U.S. 93 is actually situated on top of the dam, which rise 726.40 feet from foundation rock to the roadway on the crest. Unlike most road beds, U.S. 93 rests on top of 3.25 million cubic yards of concrete! It took five years, from 1931 to 1935, to construct Hoover Dam (originally called Boulder Dam but renamed for President Herbert Hoover). Photo taken 10/24/03.
At the time this photo was taken, the water level of Lake Mead is lower than the high water mark (as indicated by the "bath tub ring" that marks the canyon walls that were previously submerged in water). It will take several high precipitation years in the watershed of the Colorado River to bring the lake back to its previous heights. Lake Powell, located northeast of the Grand Canyon, has even lower levels of water than Lake Mead at this time. Photo taken 10/24/03.
Now leaving the Grand Canyon State, U.S. 93 enters the Silver State of Nevada right around the midpoint of the dam. Giant clocks that are situated on the dam's intake towers indicate the time difference between Mountain Standard Time (Arizona) and Pacific Time (Nevada). One of these clocks is visible in this photo. Photo taken 12/31/69.

Photo Credits:
2003-10-24 by AARoads

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Page Updated 02-01-2004.

 
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