Antelope Canyon I

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Photos from late August of this year, when Daniel Brim and I drove from California to New Mexico … in a moving van. Always fun doing three-point turns on narrow old alignments. We stopped at Antelope Canyon along the way – and this set will not include any pictures from there, as it ends just as we get there. The next batch will be the canyon itself.

California U. S. highway 466, California state route 58
Part of the collection of someone who wishes to remain anonymous. Well, the signs are visible to anyone from the public right-of-way, so you can go find them if you want! This style of directional sign, complete with glass reflectors, was used on high speed thoroughfares from 1933 to the early 50s.

Nevada U. S. highway 91, Nevada U. S. highway 93, Nevada interstate 15, Nevada state route 167
Nevada state route 167 branches off of old US-91. The road is lit from the side by a truck stop immediately behind us, that serves Interstate 15.

Nevada U. S. highway 91, Nevada U. S. highway 93, Nevada interstate 15, Nevada state route 167
The truck stop, now with actual truck.

Arizona U. S. highway 91, Arizona interstate 15
The Virgin River Gorge – Arizona interstate route 15. Whereas old US-91 went around it, I-15 was blasted straight through, saving about 30 miles.

Utah state route 59
Fires in Los Angeles result in skies like this in Utah.

Utah state route 59
One from Dan, from the same general vicinity. His pictures can be found here. Go look, as his are generally like mine, except more awesome.


California U. S. highway 99, California state route 86
Plenty of old auto club signs in Calexico, where the Greyhound bus makes its first stop. Why a Greyhound bus? Because Yuma, AZ is the cheapest place to pick up a rental van.

California U. S. highway 99, California state route 86
Behind this 1960 porcelain sign is the Mexico border fence.

California U. S. highway 99, California state route 86
This sign dates back to the early 1950s and features the California Division of Highways logo.

Arizona U. S. highway 95, Arizona interstate highway 8
And now we’re in Yuma. Button copy is getting pretty hard to find in Arizona, especially the kind with the non-reflective background.

California U. S. highway 80, California interstate highway 8
Heading westbound on I-8 in California, through the mountains that separate San Diego and Imperial counties.

California U. S. highway 80, California interstate highway 8, California state route 67
Classic porcelain signage in San Diego. This sign dates to 1968.

California U. S. highway 80, California interstate highway 8, California state route 67
Odd transitional sign at the same intersection – this one is from 1973, when they stopped using porcelain, but had not started using pre-made button copy letters. Here, the buttons are glued onto white non-reflective letters on a green background. Shortly thereafter, they decided having the letters pre-made with reflectors was far more economical.

California U. S. highway 6, California U. S. highway 395
Ominous skies over US-395.

California U. S. highway 6, California U. S. highway 395
This sign is in a museum in Randsburg. It points down the US-6/395 multiplex, with Los Angeles being accessed by US-6. US-6 was truncated in 1964, so now the stretch of road is only US-395. Don’t mind the black spot at the bottom – the sign is hanging in a closet, and I stood about eight inches away and used the flash.

California U. S. highway 6, California U. S. highway 395
A near-exact copy of an old white auto club guide sign. The logo is missing, of course, and the sign is green reflective, and not white porcelain, and the original did not have a crossbar… but that font is classic 1938!

California U. S. highway 6, California U. S. highway 395
Another one – the colors are modern but the font is original. Someone must’ve gone through this area in the last few years and done an exact replacement, just as the contract stated.

California U. S. highway 466, California state route 58
This is the style that succeeded the first Barstow picture: starting in 1948, with the plastic reflectors. This one does not have the Division of Highways logo, but is black, dating it 1957-59.

California U. S. highway 466, California state route 58
More of the same collection. The 66 shields are replicas, but the guide signs in the back – red, white, and blue; blue diamond; and white rectangle, are all original. Be sure to click for the high-resolution version. The owner was, alas, not home, so I could not get any closer photos.

Nevada U. S. highway 91, Nevada U. S. highway 93, Nevada interstate 15, Nevada state route 167
One more from the same truck stop.

Arizona U. S. highway 91, Arizona interstate 15
Interstate 15 barely cuts into Arizona between Las Vegas and St. George, Utah.

Arizona U. S. highway 91, Arizona interstate 15
Approaching the Virgin River Gorge.

Arizona U. S. highway 91, Arizona interstate 15
The view north through the gorge.

Arizona U. S. highway 91, Arizona interstate 15
And the view south, from the same overpass.

Utah state route 59
Highway 59 leads south into Arizona.

Utah state route 59
Sunrise with lots of smoke.

Arizona state route 389
And now we’re in Arizona, looking back north into Utah.

Arizona U. S. highway 89A
Heading south (east, really) on US-89A and leaving the smoke behind.

Arizona U. S. highway 89A
Looking back west on 89A.

Arizona U. S. highway 89A
Stopping for a bit to get up close and personal with the red rocks. I took this photo with the fisheye and converted it back to rectilinear.

Arizona U. S. highway 89A
Another one; slightly different direction.

Arizona U. S. highway 89A
Crossing the Colorado River at Glen Canyon Dam, near Page. Somewhat disconcerting roller-coaster look achieved by running the de-fisheye converter on an image that was rectilinear to begin with.

Arizona U. S. highway 89A
There’s a hydroelectric plant somewhere around here.

next up, actual Antelope Canyon

By |2018-01-17T14:28:13+00:00November 29th, 2009|Arizona, California, Interstate Highways, Nevada, U. S. Highways, Utah|4 Comments

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4 Comments

  1. California Highway Guy November 29, 2009 at 10:26 pm - Reply

    I always mean to tell you: You take such great pictures!

  2. Scott December 4, 2009 at 8:09 pm - Reply

    They make awesome desktops!

    Although the 11th picture down had some weird lines on the full size…

  3. Chuck December 5, 2009 at 2:41 am - Reply

    You, sir, are one heck of a photographer.

  4. Walt December 25, 2009 at 7:24 pm - Reply

    I enjoyed the trip with you.
    Great pictures- encore!

  5. Jussi Mozo August 16, 2017 at 2:51 pm - Reply

    Greetings from Finland

    You take awesome pics! Could I please use one of your road pics as a backdrop for my LinkedIn profile page?

    With best wishes,

    Jussi Mozo

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