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Bermuda

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formulanone:
I was in Bermuda for work this month, flying in from Charlotte. Since we don’t have a Bermuda thread…


Give Way! Hope you like roundabouts; this one is from exiting the LF Wade Airport (BDA):


The airport is on a large island which was once a joint US/RAF field, later transferred to the US Navy, but transferred the land back to Bermuda in 1995. An all-new terminal opened in 2020. There's a handful of flights per day from the US, which is (vaguely) the closest country to Bermuda. Air Canada and British Airways also operate flights, since there’s no flag carrier of Bermuda.


Signage seems to be Vienna Convention, using the Transport font.



Though most of Bermuda is considered one mainland island, there's also a lot of smaller islands. It's considered the remnants of an extinct volcano shield which formed 35-45 million years ago. The causeway linking the island is called…The Causeway. It was originally constructed in 1871, but rebuilt several times due to storm damage.




North Shore Drive:



Hidden Entrance becomes Concealed Entrance:


Ess Curve:


Left Curve:


Speed Humps in Flatts Village:


Automotive traffic wasn’t allowed until 1948, so mechanical transit was handled by train. There were two railway lines spanning the length of the island, but they were eventually removed. Much of it has become the Railway Trail.


North Shore Drive had a construction zone for laying utility lines, with a temporary traffic light…by the looks of things, this was the only MUTCD-spec signage!



I’ll end Day one with Langton Hill Lane, which was cut into the side of a hill, exposing the limestone and providing a canyon-like experience…


More to come…

formulanone:
Hamilton is the capital of Bermuda, and the main road is called Front Street. It's one of the few four-lane roads on the island.

There's an old traffic post in the middle of the road, affectionately called the "The Birdcage".




Front Street becomes Crow Lane, which has a traffic light, but then leads to a busy roundabout, which splits off into four routes.





There are no BGSes on Bermuda, but there are a few small green signs; in this case, telling me to stay on South Road for the beaches:




Fingerboard signs also appear from time to time.


Street Signs seem to have two varieties...a serif font I can't quite place and the Transport variety.


There's a bus service called the Breeze, using what seem to be Citroën busses. The major gas station around the island is Rubis.

SectorZ:
Nice pix! That island really is a unique part of the planet.

I can't help but think a few of those signs are getting close to Craig County styling.

I'm also perplexed on the truck signage, where it's 10t per axle and 29t total for a truck, then proceeds to show a two-axle truck in the sign for the 29t limit.

formulanone:

--- Quote from: SectorZ on August 18, 2022, 07:52:55 AM ---Nice pix! That island really is a unique part of the planet.

I can't help but think a few of those signs are getting close to Craig County styling.

I'm also perplexed on the truck signage, where it's 10t per axle and 29t total for a truck, then proceeds to show a two-axle truck in the sign for the 29t limit.

--- End quote ---

I think it's to prohibit laden multi-axle vehicles, which seemed be rare sights on the island. We saw one American-style rig pass by the road a few times that week, which stood out like a sore thumb on those narrow roads. It was never carrying a trailer, so I wonder if it was doing off-road hauling. There were also a few larger versions of "mini-trucks", and they had little warning decals of 10,000kg limits.

The taxi driver told me that the "temporary" dual bridge structure on The Causeway has been there for a while.

Road/driver/vehicle-related notes:

* Only Bermuda citizens may own or drive gas-powered vehicles.
* If you're a tourist, you can rent an electric vehicle. It was $24 an hour, and $100 a day.
* Only one car is allowed per household, unless it is a registered work vehicle or taxi.
* You can own as many motorcycles or mopeds as you like.
* Gas was the equivalent of $8.50-9.00 / gallon (sold in liters)
* Speed limits are very low. 40 km/h is the highest posted speed limit, and there's substantial penalties for more than one speeding ticket in a year.
* Vehicles are separated into sizes for taxation; so there's a lot of small, sub-compact cars that you won't find in the US and Canada.

Other info:

* Bermudians don't really think of themselves as "Caribbean".
* Quite a wide variety of spoken accents, even among Bermudians.
* Due to the possibility of Atlantic hurricanes, all structures are concrete, as well as most roofs.
* Their Dollar is pegged to the US Dollar, so there's no exchange rate.
* US credit cards still have a International Transaction fee on purchases.
* Import duties on seemingly everything; very little is manufactured in Bermuda, it's only 21 square miles of land.
* Things get expensive; land and space is scarce. But there's no sales tax, GST, VAT, et cetera.
* Gratuities are worked into every sit-down meal (legally it's an 17% maximum). Sometimes they call it a "service charge".

abefroman329:

--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Their Dollar is pegged to the US Dollar, so there's no exchange rate.
* US credit cards still have a International Transaction fee on purchases.
--- End quote ---
Same deal in the Bahamas - I have separate debit and credit cards that are linked to accts that don't charge a foreign transaction fee, and my debit card wasn't working, so I had to use my regular one, and promptly got socked with a 3% charge.

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