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Bermuda

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US 89:
My aunt and uncle lived in Bermuda for several years, so I've been there a couple of times. It's a fascinating world.


--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Vehicles are separated into sizes for taxation; so there's a lot of small, sub-compact cars that you won't find in the US and Canada.

--- End quote ---

And a typical US/Canada compact car won't even fit into a lot of the parking spaces, nor would it be all that comfortable to drive on the narrow streets there. Bermuda is one of the most densely populated places on this planet and any amount of space is at a premium.


--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Speed limits are very low. 40 km/h is the highest posted speed limit, and there's substantial penalties for more than one speeding ticket in a year.

--- End quote ---

I get the sense that these limits aren't all that enforced though, because people absolutely blast down those narrow roads at speeds I would never feel comfortable doing on my own. The general speed on something like Middle Rd or South Rd was shockingly high, and the concept of being a pedestrian anywhere outside of Hamilton rather horrified me.


--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Only Bermuda citizens may own or drive gas-powered vehicles.

--- End quote ---

This is not true - I think it's limited to Bermuda residents. My aunt and uncle drove a little Honda Fit despite not being Bermudian citizens. I am also pretty sure they only let non-citizens stay there so many years, which is why my uncle's company eventually relocated them to London.

Another note on gas - if I recall correctly, the stations there are OR or NJ style full serve.


--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Due to the possibility of Atlantic hurricanes, all structures are concrete, as well as most roofs.

--- End quote ---

The roofs are also specially designed to catch rainwater, as there are no rivers on the island. Most buildings supply their own water and do not have any connection to any sort of municipal water system.


--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 05:45:57 AM ---Street Signs seem to have two varieties...a serif font I can't quite place and the Transport variety.


--- End quote ---

I don't know what that serif font is either, but I'm 80% sure I've seen that same font in the UK in more rural areas.

Also not mentioned above is that most Bermuda traffic signals use the UK style red+yellow indication immediately before the green. The ones that didn't were pedestrian crossings where the red light went to a flashing yellow at the end of the pedestrian cycle, but I'm not sure if any of those are still around.

formulanone:

--- Quote from: US 89 on August 18, 2022, 12:43:27 PM ---
--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Only Bermuda citizens may own or drive gas-powered vehicles.

--- End quote ---

This is not true - I think it's limited to Bermuda residents. My aunt and uncle drove a little Honda Fit despite not being Bermudian citizens. I am also pretty sure they only let non-citizens stay there so many years, which is why my uncle's company eventually relocated them to London.
--- End quote ---

I mixed that up, sorry. A Honda Fit is just about right for most of the island. Though a Suzuki Jimny seems about right if it rains or need a little ground clearance, but those were $41,000 cars (they'd probably retail for $22-25k in the US, but they're not certified here).


--- Quote from: US 89 on August 18, 2022, 12:43:27 PM ---Another note on gas - if I recall correctly, the stations there are OR or NJ style full serve.
--- End quote ---
Yup, noticed that at the Rubis (the only brand I saw on the island) next to the store I was at. Only two grades that I noticed: Regular or Diesel.


--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---* Due to the possibility of Atlantic hurricanes, all structures are concrete, as well as most roofs.


--- Quote from: US 89 on August 18, 2022, 12:43:27 PM ---The roofs are also specially designed to catch rainwater, as there are no rivers on the island. Most buildings supply their own water and do not have any connection to any sort of municipal water system.
--- End quote ---

--- End quote ---
Yeah, that's what I figured from seeing very little outward slant to the flat part of roofs, and a drain in the center. Or they have "steps".


--- Quote from: US 89 on August 18, 2022, 12:43:27 PM ---
--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 05:45:57 AM ---Street Signs seem to have two varieties...a serif font I can't quite place and the Transport variety.


--- End quote ---
I don't know what that serif font is either, but I'm 80% sure I've seen that same font in the UK in more rural areas.
--- End quote ---

But they also still seem to use it, since there was a newly-renamed street.


--- Quote from: US 89 on August 18, 2022, 12:43:27 PM ---Also not mentioned above is that most Bermuda traffic signals use the UK style red+yellow indication immediately before the green. The ones that didn't were pedestrian crossings where the red light went to a flashing yellow at the end of the pedestrian cycle, but I'm not sure if any of those are still around.

--- End quote ---

I thought I caught one out of the corner of my eye in downtown Hamilton, but didn't notice it when I was driving.

Court Street in Hamilton.


I like the curve in the post; I noticed the yellow arrow phase was embedded in the same "ball" location or not. White reflective back plates looked new-ish.


Edit: fixed mis-attributed quotes.

formulanone:
I also think I found a sign error (or accidental swap?) when I was there. South Road had a Playground warning sign with a mounted horse. Hey, even equines need to play:



A little bit up the road was a HORSE CROSSING sign. That's a funny-looking horse...

7/8:

--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 12:55:08 PM ---I don't know what that serif font is either, but I'm 80% sure I've seen that same font in the UK in more rural areas.

--- End quote ---

Looks similar to the "Privet Drive" sign used in Harry Potter.


Also, these are great photos! It's very cool to learn more roadgeek stuff outside US/Canada.

1995hoo:

--- Quote from: formulanone on August 18, 2022, 09:33:29 AM ---....

* Bermudians don't really think of themselves as "Caribbean"
....

--- End quote ---

They shouldn't think of themselves as "Caribbean." Look at a map and you'll see why—it's at roughly the same latitude (32°20') as Charleston, South Carolina (32°47').

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