AARoads Forum

Non-Road Boards => Off-Topic => Weather => Topic started by: Pink Jazz on March 18, 2021, 03:02:12 PM

Title: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: Pink Jazz on March 18, 2021, 03:02:12 PM
NWS to Begin Implementing Tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings in April - WeatherNation (weathernationtv.com) (https://www.weathernationtv.com/news/nws-to-begin-implementing-tiered-severe-thunderstorm-warnings-in-april/)

It looks like the NWS starting in late April will introduce tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings.

"Base" level SVRs will have no tag and will have the same criteria as the current definition.

"Considerable" level SVRs will have 1.75" hail (golf-ball sized) and/or 70 mph winds.

"Destructive" level SVRs will have 2.75" hail (baseball sized) and/or 80 mph winds.

Those in the "Destructive" tier will activate Wireless Emergency Alerts on mobile phones.

This will be useful for alerting those for the most destructive severe thunderstorms, since a derecho can be more destructive than an EF0 tornado.
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: GaryV on March 18, 2021, 03:23:48 PM
What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: hobsini2 on March 18, 2021, 10:47:35 PM
What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?

I'm going to guess coins. We still do.
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: triplemultiplex on March 26, 2021, 02:54:46 PM
What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?

Tree nuts?
Buttons?
Livestock testicles?
Or how about various animal poos?  Hail size could be anywhere from rabbit pellet to horse apple.
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: Zeffy on March 26, 2021, 04:24:04 PM
What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?

Reed Timmer (a well known storm chaser) uses GORILLA HAIL (yes all caps) for hail larger than 3 inches.

What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?

Tree nuts?
Buttons?
Livestock testicles?
Or how about various animal poos?  Hail size could be anywhere from rabbit pellet to horse apple.

That last one is so vaguely specific  :ded:
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: jayhawkco on March 26, 2021, 05:06:42 PM
What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?

I don't think anyone really had to do any hail comparisons before 3000 BC.  It was just the gods being mad at you. 

Chris
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: triplemultiplex on March 30, 2021, 05:22:26 PM
I don't think anyone really had to do any hail comparisons before 3000 BC.  It was just the gods being mad at you. 

The larger the hail, the more you pissed off the gods.
In which case perhaps the hail stones are named based on how import of an animal you had to sacrifice in order to appease those gods.
And that's where we get the expression "raining cats and dogs". :-D
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: US71 on June 11, 2021, 08:26:52 PM
What did people compare hail to before there were various sports using balls?

I don't think anyone really had to do any hail comparisons before 3000 BC.  It was just the gods being mad at you. 

Chris

Or just Thor
Title: Re: NWS to implement tiered Severe Thunderstorm Warnings
Post by: Pink Jazz on August 15, 2021, 06:56:45 PM
As a side discussion, NWS Phoenix never seems to issue Base level FFWs.  All recent FFWs issued by NWS Phoenix seem to be at least the Considerable tier; haven't seen any Catastrophic yet.  I just wonder if they are doing this just to send out Wireless Emergency Alerts or is there some other reason.  Base level FFWs no longer activate Wireless Emergency Alerts.  I'm not sure what is the exact criteria for the FFW tiers, at least for SVRs there are clear-cut criteria for each tier.