AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules to ensure post quality. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Alaska  (Read 11016 times)

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 19385
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 07:34:04 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #50 on: January 21, 2020, 08:15:38 PM »

I get your points though among various things like planning for growth even if currently there isn't much going on doesn't hurt. Safety is another benefit of grade separation and having a solid, fully controlled access facility between the states two largest cities is a win-win all around, IMO. Sure it is what I suspect and I guess we will see where those cities go. Good planning never hurts.

It's not a win-win when money that could be spent on more worthwhile projects gets wasted on upgrading a highway that doesn't need it.

Good planning never hurts, but building things that don't need to be built does hurt.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. Dick
If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

Plutonic Panda

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1898
  • Location: Los Angeles/OKC
  • Last Login: Today at 07:27:40 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #51 on: January 21, 2020, 11:01:33 PM »

I get your points though among various things like planning for growth even if currently there isn't much going on doesn't hurt. Safety is another benefit of grade separation and having a solid, fully controlled access facility between the states two largest cities is a win-win all around, IMO. Sure it is what I suspect and I guess we will see where those cities go. Good planning never hurts.

It's not a win-win when money that could be spent on more worthwhile projects gets wasted on upgrading a highway that doesn't need it.

Good planning never hurts, but building things that don't need to be built does hurt.
This was only my vision for Alaska. If what I proposed isn't needed now then it should be planned for, IMO.
Logged

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14310
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 38
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 12:40:13 AM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Alaska
« Reply #52 on: January 22, 2020, 12:25:40 AM »

I get your points though among various things like planning for growth even if currently there isn't much going on doesn't hurt. Safety is another benefit of grade separation and having a solid, fully controlled access facility between the states two largest cities is a win-win all around, IMO. Sure it is what I suspect and I guess we will see where those cities go. Good planning never hurts.

It's not a win-win when money that could be spent on more worthwhile projects gets wasted on upgrading a highway that doesn't need it.

Good planning never hurts, but building things that don't need to be built does hurt.
This was only my vision for Alaska. If what I proposed isn't needed now then it should be planned for, IMO.
Please stop injecting your opinion for future unbuilt freeways - that belongs in the Fictional Highways part of the forum. A 2000 AADT on a 2-lane wilderness road does not need any help. Please limit discussion here to actual proposals. Thank you.

Plutonic Panda

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1898
  • Location: Los Angeles/OKC
  • Last Login: Today at 07:27:40 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #53 on: January 22, 2020, 12:50:21 AM »

I get your points though among various things like planning for growth even if currently there isn't much going on doesn't hurt. Safety is another benefit of grade separation and having a solid, fully controlled access facility between the states two largest cities is a win-win all around, IMO. Sure it is what I suspect and I guess we will see where those cities go. Good planning never hurts.

It's not a win-win when money that could be spent on more worthwhile projects gets wasted on upgrading a highway that doesn't need it.

Good planning never hurts, but building things that don't need to be built does hurt.
This was only my vision for Alaska. If what I proposed isn't needed now then it should be planned for, IMO.
Please stop injecting your opinion for future unbuilt freeways - that belongs in the Fictional Highways part of the forum. A 2000 AADT on a 2-lane wilderness road does not need any help. Please limit discussion here to actual proposals. Thank you.
Sure but perhaps you should be a bit more reasonable.

First off, this forum is littered with posts outside of the fictional sectional section with suggestions of what to do with freeways. While I can see your point about my opinions Iíll keep expressing them how I see fit. I donít however wish to break forum rules and so Iíll make my second point.

2. If you bothered to read my initial post it were more of a question to what the plans were for Alaska and more specifically Anchorageís plan. Maybe I didnít phrase it right, maybe you felt I put too much emphasis on my suggestions, maybe you agree Kphoger my ideas are ridiculous.? Either way I didnít post with simply a fantasy about what Iíd like to see happen, I provided my opinions of what Iíd like to see in a single post and in that same post asked about Alaskaís plans. I am well aware of the fantasy subsection and if I wanted to only provide my input I would have just done so with no questions.
Logged

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14310
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 38
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 12:40:13 AM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Alaska
« Reply #54 on: January 22, 2020, 01:02:50 AM »

I understand. Please know I'm a moderator, and therefore I can break out the purple text: Back to on-topic discussion.

Plutonic Panda

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1898
  • Location: Los Angeles/OKC
  • Last Login: Today at 07:27:40 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #55 on: January 22, 2020, 03:40:35 AM »

Gotcha. Thought I was at any rate.  :coffee:
Logged

Kniwt

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 713
  • Last Login: Today at 05:15:42 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #56 on: February 22, 2020, 11:27:18 PM »

Anchorage Daily News reports today on the Denali Park Road and how, despite assurances from the National Park Service, the road is becoming increasingly susceptible to landslides and other road-closing events:
https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/2020/02/23/worries-about-the-fate-of-denali-park-road-persist-as-tourism-season-looms/

Quote
But dramatic changes are making the road increasingly vulnerable to landslides. The park service closed parts of the road multiple times last summer amid heavy rains, rockfall and mudslides, including an incident in August that left around 300 people and 17 buses stranded for a few hours about halfway down the road.

... A slowly advancing slide near the roadís halfway point, known as the Pretty Rocks landslide, is one of many areas along the road that is unstable.

Recent National Park Service surveys found that since September, the speed of the landslide at Pretty Rocks has increased dramatically: The road was slumping nearly 2 inches every day after August, according to a report from the park service.

... There are multiple solutions proposed for fixing the road, including rerouting a segment or building a bridge across the unstable areas, according to park service reports. Tunneling below the landslide or building up supports against landslides was deemed unfeasible.

Logged

cpzilliacus

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10998
  • Age: 62
  • Location: Maryland
  • Last Login: Today at 05:10:45 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #57 on: February 25, 2020, 12:00:14 AM »

Washington Post [Washington, D.C.]: Steep budget cuts left Alaska with only one operating mainline ferry. Then it broke down.

Quote
The change in the noise coming from the Matanuskaís engines was a clue something was wrong with the ferry. A peek out the window was confirmation.

Quote
ďWe were creeping along,Ē said Adrianne Milos, one of the passengers making what should have been a three-day trip from Bellingham, Wash., home to Alaska in late January.

Quote
The crew came on loudspeakers and announced theyíd be bringing the ship into Juneau at half speed.

Quote
When they finally arrived, Milos, her husband and their cat, Squeaks, were only 70 miles from home in Haines, a small community up the Lynn Canal from Juneau. But they were effectively stranded.

Quote
A 30 percent budget cut imposed on the ferry system last year and unforeseen maintenance problems meant the Matanuska was the only mainline ferry operating on the Alaska Marine Highway System. Now it was broken down, presenting more than an inconvenience to Milos and fellow passengers: Communities already reeling from service cuts faced a month with next to no ferries at all.
Logged
Opinions expressed here on AAROADS are strictly personal and mine alone, and do not reflect policies or positions of MWCOG, NCRTPB or their member federal, state, county and municipal governments or any other agency.

vdeane

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12318
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Latham, NY
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 09:28:58 PM
    • New York State Roads
Re: Alaska
« Reply #58 on: February 25, 2020, 01:15:46 PM »

Cordova?  Seems they'd be a lot better off if they had just finished AK 10, but why do I suspect they'd rather let the town die completely rather than finish the road?

The end of the article certainly makes the case for why elected officials are bad decision makers when it comes to transportation.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

cpzilliacus

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10998
  • Age: 62
  • Location: Maryland
  • Last Login: Today at 05:10:45 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #59 on: February 25, 2020, 02:03:53 PM »

The end of the article certainly makes the case for why elected officials are bad decision makers when it comes to transportation.

And there are apparently a lot of people unhappy with the current governor of Alaska, as there is an active effort to recall him from office (details can be found here).
Logged
Opinions expressed here on AAROADS are strictly personal and mine alone, and do not reflect policies or positions of MWCOG, NCRTPB or their member federal, state, county and municipal governments or any other agency.

Plutonic Panda

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1898
  • Location: Los Angeles/OKC
  • Last Login: Today at 07:27:40 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #60 on: September 28, 2020, 07:16:54 PM »

This isnít necessarily road related but isnít mass transit either. Still, this worthy of a mention as a 1,600 rail line will be built from Alaska to the US. Iím not sure if the entire rail line will have to be constructed or it already exists for the most part and only needing a permit to cross the border. Either way, this seems like a pretty big deal.

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/2020/09/26/trump-tweets-intent-to-issue-permit-for-rail-line-connecting-alaska-to-canada-and-rest-of-us/
Logged

oscar

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 8798
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Arlington, VA
  • Last Login: Today at 12:19:56 AM
    • my Hot Springs and Highways pages
Re: Alaska
« Reply #61 on: September 28, 2020, 07:45:06 PM »

This isnít necessarily road related but isnít mass transit either. Still, this worthy of a mention as a 1,600 rail line will be built from Alaska to the US. Iím not sure if the entire rail line will have to be constructed or it already exists for the most part and only needing a permit to cross the border. Either way, this seems like a pretty big deal.

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/2020/09/26/trump-tweets-intent-to-issue-permit-for-rail-line-connecting-alaska-to-canada-and-rest-of-us/

Most of it is unbuilt, including all of the Yukon segment, everything in Alaska east of Delta Junction, and everything in British Columbia northwest of Dease Lake. There is some partially developed right of way between Fairbanks and Delta Junction, and southeast of Dease Lake, but no tracks.

As the linked article notes, one possible use of the new rail line is for the export of oil from Alberta's oil sands. Especially given the history of the planned Keystone pipeline from Alberta to Texas, this is guaranteed to stir up intense controversy.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2020, 07:48:52 PM by oscar »
Logged
my Hot Springs and Highways pages, with links to my roads sites:
http://www.alaskaroads.com/home.html

zzcarp

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 312
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Westminster, CO
  • Last Login: Today at 03:01:56 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #62 on: September 28, 2020, 08:17:17 PM »

This CBC article gives more information about the routing:

Quote
The project would build a new rail line from Fort McMurray, Alta., through the Northwest Territories and Yukon to the Delta Junction in Alaska, where it will connect with existing rail and continue on to ports near Anchorage.

Googling from that article, I found a website a2arail.com where they have maps of the proposed routes. Looks like it will avoid Whitehorse entirely and also cut a new terrain route along the BC/NW Territories border and through Alberta to Ft. McMurray.

Logged
So many miles and so many roads

vdeane

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12318
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Latham, NY
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 09:28:58 PM
    • New York State Roads
Re: Alaska
« Reply #63 on: September 28, 2020, 08:33:09 PM »

I wonder what the potential for Amtrak service would be if this gets done.  I could see Canada pushing for an auto train running between Alaska and the rest of the US "just in case", given their recent experiences with the Alaska exemption to their ban on non-essential border crossings - especially since the experts consider another pandemic to be a matter of when not if.

Aside from that, I also remember when the lack of a rail connection between Alaska and the rest of the continent was cited as a challenge for a Bering Strait rail tunnel.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14310
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 38
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 12:40:13 AM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Alaska
« Reply #64 on: September 28, 2020, 09:04:39 PM »

It's going to take more than 4 days to get to Anchorage by rail, why is it a benefit to be 4 days closer to Asia...

mgk920

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4129
  • Location: Appleton, WI USA
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 10:11:56 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #65 on: September 29, 2020, 04:26:53 AM »

IIRC, from discussions that I have followed over the past several years, it is indeed to allow the Canadians to export Tar Sands oil to Asia.  However, there is no place left to build a commercial sea port on Canada's west coast.

What they propose to do is to build a standard gauge railroad from the Fort McMurray, AB area to Delta Junction, AK in order to feed that oil into the Trans Alaska Pipeline.  The Pipeline is seeing a steady long-term decline in traffic volume due to the North Slope oil fields being played out, so there is capacity in it to carry the Tar Sands oil from Delta Junction to the sea port at Valdez, AK.

The expected volume of traffic that I have seen discussed could very well require that that rail line be built as double track, so it would certainly be doable from an economic standpoint and Delta Junction is close enough to the end of ARR's (Alaska Railroad) track at nearby Eielson Air Force Base, just southeast of North Pole, AK, that connecting them would not be a major stretch.

It is not proposed to go anywhere near the never completed BCOL line at Dease Lake, BC.

I suppose that once things are up and running, it could also be attractive to passenger operators to offer multi day excursions through some of the most wild and unspoiled scenery on the planet, much like Amtrak does on some of their current long distance runs (ie, the ever popular Empire Builder and California Zephyr), but it would primarily be a freight route.

Mike
Logged

Stephane Dumas

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2283
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 10:36:42 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #66 on: September 29, 2020, 01:55:19 PM »

I agree about Dease Lake, it could bring an opportunity to revive that project who could became an alternate link.  Also the proposed line will meet the CN line who was fermely known as Mackenzie Northern Railway and way back then as Great Slave Lake Railway who linked Alberta to Hay River, NWT.
Logged

mgk920

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4129
  • Location: Appleton, WI USA
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 10:11:56 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #67 on: September 29, 2020, 02:19:38 PM »

I agree about Dease Lake, it could bring an opportunity to revive that project who could became an alternate link.  Also the proposed line will meet the CN line who was fermely known as Mackenzie Northern Railway and way back then as Great Slave Lake Railway who linked Alberta to Hay River, NWT.

CN took over the BCOL (British Columbia Railway) several years ago, too.  I'm not sure how interested they'd be in ever completing BCOL's partially built line to Dease Lake.

Mike
Logged

oscar

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 8798
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Arlington, VA
  • Last Login: Today at 12:19:56 AM
    • my Hot Springs and Highways pages
Re: Alaska
« Reply #68 on: September 29, 2020, 02:33:32 PM »

IIRC, from discussions that I have followed over the past several years, it is indeed to allow the Canadians to export Tar Sands oil to Asia.  However, there is no place left to build a commercial sea port on Canada's west coast.

That didn't stop the effort to build a pipeline to the coast across British Columbia. First Nations in the way of the pipeline route were the main problem.

Could existing ports in BC, including Stewart's deep-water port, handle extra volume from the tar sands oil?

CN took over the BCOL (British Columbia Railway) several years ago, too.  I'm not sure how interested they'd be in ever completing BCOL's partially built line to Dease Lake.

One of the reasons it's only partially built is that the potentially exportable resource from the Dease Lake area was asbestos. That market died around the time BCOL pulled the plug on the Dease Lake line.
Logged
my Hot Springs and Highways pages, with links to my roads sites:
http://www.alaskaroads.com/home.html

The Ghostbuster

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3110
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Madison, WI
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 09:42:30 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #69 on: September 29, 2020, 03:39:45 PM »

Even if this project is fully funded (which I'm skeptical it will be), how many years of construction will it take to complete the route? If all goes smoothly (which pretty much never happens), I'd say this line probably won't open for at least a few decades, at minimum. With all the litigation I expect this project will endure, it might be faster to walk the entire length of the project, and carry all the freight via muscle power than to do it by train along this corridor.
Logged

mgk920

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4129
  • Location: Appleton, WI USA
  • Last Login: August 02, 2021, 10:11:56 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #70 on: September 29, 2020, 03:49:11 PM »

Even if this project is fully funded (which I'm skeptical it will be), how many years of construction will it take to complete the route? If all goes smoothly (which pretty much never happens), I'd say this line probably won't open for at least a few decades, at minimum. With all the litigation I expect this project will endure, it might be faster to walk the entire length of the project, and carry all the freight via muscle power than to do it by train along this corridor.

Yes, I know that there was a strong incentive to get it done (a establish a supply route that was out of range of enemy fire from the Pacific Ocean), the original Alaska Highway was completed and opened in less than one year.

Mike
Logged

Bruce

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3286
  • Transit Commuter

  • Age: 24
  • Location: Snohomish County, WA
  • Last Login: Today at 04:04:39 AM
    • Wikipedia
Re: Alaska
« Reply #71 on: September 29, 2020, 07:16:53 PM »

I suppose that once things are up and running, it could also be attractive to passenger operators to offer multi day excursions through some of the most wild and unspoiled scenery on the planet, much like Amtrak does on some of their current long distance runs (ie, the ever popular Empire Builder and California Zephyr), but it would primarily be a freight route.

Realistically, I think a private operator like the Rocky Mountaineer will be the first to try and set up an Alaskan excursion on the line. They already run on routes that don't have Amtrak/VIA service.

triplemultiplex

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2595
  • "You read it; you can't unread it!"

  • Location: inside the beltline
  • Last Login: July 30, 2021, 01:51:48 PM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #72 on: October 05, 2020, 01:25:43 PM »

The consequences of this rail project would go far beyond the direct impacts of laying track through the wilderness.

Funny that oscar mentioned a proposed rail project that would have served an extraction industry in the same region; one where the material was found to be extremely detrimental to our well being.  So we left it in the ground.  And the rail project was cancelled.
Seems like a blueprint worth duplicating.
Logged
"That's just like... your opinion, man."

splashflash

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 64
  • Location: Vancouver Island
  • Last Login: July 23, 2021, 12:55:06 AM
Re: Alaska
« Reply #73 on: October 05, 2020, 11:23:42 PM »

IIRC, from discussions that I have followed over the past several years, it is indeed to allow the Canadians to export Tar Sands oil to Asia.  However, there is no place left to build a commercial sea port on Canada's west coast.

That didn't stop the effort to build a pipeline to the coast across British Columbia. First Nations in the way of the pipeline route were the main problem.

Could existing ports in BC, including Stewart's deep-water port, handle extra volume from the tar sands oil?

CN took over the BCOL (British Columbia Railway) several years ago, too.  I'm not sure how interested they'd be in ever completing BCOL's partially built line to Dease Lake.

One of the reasons it's only partially built is that the potentially exportable resource from the Dease Lake area was asbestos. That market died around the time BCOL pulled the plug on the Dease Lake line.

The northwest extension of BC Rail was abandoned in the mid 1970's.  Coal, copper concentrate and asbestos were commodities that were projected to be extracted to justify the line.   Asbestos extraction stopped around 1992 while copper extraction only started large-scale in 2014.  Coal extraction never materialized because of price-drops and more recently First Nations opposition.  The line extends a ways beyond Fort St. James for forestry products, but likely not for mineral commodities.  The roadbed is still visible in many locations.

The projected line would completely bypass BC and likely not connect to the former BCRail, CN Fort Nelson extension.

Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.