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Author Topic: CA 198  (Read 2029 times)

Max Rockatansky

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CA 198
« on: September 20, 2019, 12:09:32 AM »

Found myself out on CA 198 from the Kings County line east to CA 245 this afternoon.  That being the case I was able to cobble all my previous photos with the new stuff today into a full CA 198 photo album.  Those familiar with this board probably have heard me talk about CA 198 extensively since it really has two kick as segments; US 101 east over the Gabilan/Diablo Ranges to CA 33 and east of CA 245 to the entrance of Sequoia National Park.  I'm looking at consolidating everything done previously on Gribblenation into a new catch-all article (hopefully tomorrow) but I figured I'd get something posted now:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmH8aUYJ

Note; I used the 1923 Pumpkin Hollow Bridge carrying CA 198 over the Kaweah River.  I'd probably rank the Pumpkin Hollow Bridge with anything Big Sur has to offer, it really is a beautiful design.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2019, 11:35:39 PM »

Over the past four years I've interacted with CA 198 more than any other State Highway in California.  Fortunately that being the case CA 198 just so happens to have one of the top driving segments in the State Highway System between US 101 east to CA 33 and has a lengthy history spanning over a century.  CA 198 was first signed over Legislative Route 10 starting in 1934 from US 101 in San Lucas east to the Generals Highway of Sequoia National Park.  LRN 10 was first added to the State Highway System during the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act between Goshen and Hanford.  LRN 10 saw an extension west to San Lucas in 1915 and east to the Middle Fork Road (later the Generals Highway) of Sequoia National Park during the 1919 Third State Highway Bond Act.  The blog below contains dozens of maps showing the construction and early shifts of LRN 10 into what became the original surface route of CA 198 up to the modern freeway/expressway system seen in San Joaquin Valley today.  California has a lot of worth while State Routes but for some reason CA 198 seems to float under the radar.

https://www.gribblenation.org/2019/09/california-state-route-198.html
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sparker

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2019, 03:15:59 AM »

Seems like CA 198 has always been taken for granted even though it is, after CA 152, arguably the most heavily-traveled E-W state arterial crossing the SJ Valley (courtesy of the growth of Visalia and Hanford).   The fact that both ends are immensely scenic is simply icing on the cake.  When I was a kid tagging along with my family on our several-times-per-year schlep up 99 from L.A. to Sacramento, I always considered crossing 198 as the point where SoCal was left behind and the northern part of the state commenced. 
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2020, 12:08:54 AM »

This past week I noticed that someone built a stairwell to a memorial in Warthan Canyon at about Post Mile 13.500.  I have no idea who built it but it has all sorts of BLM notices all over it:

IMG_3315 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

IMG_3323 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

Cool view from the top though:

IMG_3321 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

IMG_3325 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr
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mapman

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2020, 09:10:08 PM »

This past week I noticed that someone built a stairwell to a memorial in Warthan Canyon at about Post Mile 13.500.  I have no idea who built it but it has all sorts of BLM notices all over it:

Some quick research on the internet uncovered two possible theories on the origins of the outlook:
1. The bridge was constructed in 1951, replacing a more dangerous route around the canyon.  The bridge was celebrated by the greater Coalinga area, so it may have been constructed at this time.
2. Game Warden Clarence Lester Brown was killed in a car accident when patrolling the canyon in 1959.  I'm not certain if the accident was anywhere near CA 198, but the overlook could be in tribute to him.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2020, 09:13:18 PM »

This past week I noticed that someone built a stairwell to a memorial in Warthan Canyon at about Post Mile 13.500.  I have no idea who built it but it has all sorts of BLM notices all over it:

Some quick research on the internet uncovered two possible theories on the origins of the outlook:
1. The bridge was constructed in 1951, replacing a more dangerous route around the canyon.  The bridge was celebrated by the greater Coalinga area, so it may have been constructed at this time.
2. Game Warden Clarence Lester Brown was killed in a car accident when patrolling the canyon in 1959.  I'm not certain if the accident was anywhere near CA 198, but the overlook could be in tribute to him.

Interestingly the stair isnít on the 2013 GSV image.  In my own photo stock I believe I can see it in a distant shot appearing at some point between 2017 and 2019.  The paint seemingly was pretty fresh, it looks like it is a rogue install. 
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coatimundi

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2020, 01:02:19 AM »

Well, there's also 46. That's probably just a bit under 152 on traffic counts. 198 is likely higher than 58, but that's not saying much. Every time I drive south, I take 198. It's a great road. Only issue is that there's a petroleum route going through there, and it's easy to get stuck behind one of them going uphill with no where to pass.

It's crazy to see the shrine at night because it's actually all lit up. It just appears in the otherwise pitch-black canyon. Very ominous. Never actually stopped, but there's a video online, and that's Guadalupe. Not sure why they would have her in this particular spot though. Maybe someone important and Mexican died there?
But a trail existed before the staircase was built. What's really weird is that parking area just appearing on the side of the road. How often does that happen? Obviously this place is attracting a lot of attention. Next time I'm in Coalinga, I guess...
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2020, 11:43:48 PM »

I found myself on CA 198 today in Kings County and took in some of the recent changes.  Below it the new roundabout at the Hanford-Armona Road entrance ramp:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmPuqG5q

The CA 198 freeway between Avenal Cut-Off Road and the main entrance to NAS Lemoore now has the shoulder signed as the bike lane.  This is from the NAS Lemoore intersection headed east on CA 198 at the start of the freeway:

IMG_0035 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

Previously all segments of the CA 198 freeway were bicycle prohibited.  This made little sense since there is no alternative bike route until Avenal Cut-Off Road and Jackson Avenue (Old CA 198).  This is what the view above looked like previously:

IMG_0287 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr
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sparker

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2020, 01:17:01 AM »

^^^^^^^^^^^^
Looks like all D6 needed to do to effect the bike lane was to paint a white line adjacent to the rumble strip.  This seems to be increasingly common along rural state freeways, particularly where there are no frontage roads or viable nearby alternatives for bicycle riders.   My only concern would be for cyclists having to actually enter the right traffic lane if a stopped vehicle is blocking what would intrinsically double as the breakdown lane.   I suppose time will tell whether or not this concept is sustainable.   
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2020, 06:03:06 AM »

^^^^^^^^^^^^
Looks like all D6 needed to do to effect the bike lane was to paint a white line adjacent to the rumble strip.  This seems to be increasingly common along rural state freeways, particularly where there are no frontage roads or viable nearby alternatives for bicycle riders.   My only concern would be for cyclists having to actually enter the right traffic lane if a stopped vehicle is blocking what would intrinsically double as the breakdown lane.   I suppose time will tell whether or not this concept is sustainable.   

Apparently the existing bike route was Grangeville Road which basically has no paved shoulder.  There was signage advising cars to pass bicycles at a minimum of three foot distance.  Compared to how dicey that configuration was I would imagine that the combination of Jackson Avenue and 198 would be a substantial upgrade.  Amusingly since those signs have been erected Iíve seen people use 198 as a running route. 
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sparker

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2020, 02:14:46 PM »

^^^^^^^^^^^^
Looks like all D6 needed to do to effect the bike lane was to paint a white line adjacent to the rumble strip.  This seems to be increasingly common along rural state freeways, particularly where there are no frontage roads or viable nearby alternatives for bicycle riders.   My only concern would be for cyclists having to actually enter the right traffic lane if a stopped vehicle is blocking what would intrinsically double as the breakdown lane.   I suppose time will tell whether or not this concept is sustainable.   

Apparently the existing bike route was Grangeville Road which basically has no paved shoulder.  There was signage advising cars to pass bicycles at a minimum of three foot distance.  Compared to how dicey that configuration was I would imagine that the combination of Jackson Avenue and 198 would be a substantial upgrade.  Amusingly since those signs have been erected Iíve seen people use 198 as a running route. 

Interesting to speculate how Caltrans would respond to the pedestrian incursions; they could potentially post a yellow diamond sign with a running shoe depicted on it!  Then let the various manufacturers put up $$ for logo placement on said picture! :-P
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2020, 06:50:34 PM »

Inspired by a post I saw on the California's Historic Highways Facebook group on the 15th I made my way out to Lake Kaweah in the Sierra Nevada Mountains this morning to hike two abandoned alignments of California State Route 198/Legislative Route Number 10.  At the moment the water level at Lake Kaweah is low enough that much of the previous routes of CA 198 can be explored on foot.  The old alignments of CA 198/LRN 10 can be found heading west from the Slick Rock Recreation Area (it's access road is also part of former CA 198).  Legislative Route 10 was extended east of Hanford to Sequoia National Park in 1919 and was assigned CA 198 beginning in 1934.   CA 198 was relocated to higher ground when the Terminus Dam was being constructed in the early 1960s.  Photos of the two abandoned alignments of CA 198 can be found on the Flickr album below:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmSnmzcS

Some brief notes:

Photo IMG_2320:  Looking west from entrance of the Slick Rock Recreation Area one can see modern CA 198 on the left and the former alignment descending into the Lake Kaweah Reservoir on the right.
Photo IMG_2334:  Former CA 198 descends into the Lake Kaweah Reservoir to a locked gate.  The crest of the Lake Kaweah Reservoir can be observed by looking at the bathtub rings on the surrounding hill sides. 
Photo IMG_2337:  A retaining wall is easily observed west of the locked gate in Photo 2.
Photo IMG_2340:  The alignments of CA 198 split west of the gate in Photo 2.  The oldest alignment can be found on the left path whereas a more modernized roadway can be found on the right. 
Photo IMG_2345:  The oldest alignment of CA 198 follows the hillside and is surfaced with concrete slabs which are common to First-Third State Highway Bond Act roads.  Unfortunately I did not find any C Blocks.
Photo IMG_2355:  The oldest alignment of CA 198 crosses Horse Creek via a one lane bridge.  I'm not sure what vintage the structure is but I believe it predates the 1919 extension of Legislative Route 10.  From this bridge the older alignment of CA 198 follows the hillside west to a more modernized bridge on the pre-1960s alignment.
Photo IMG_2379:  Backtracking to Photo IMG_2345 the right path is the pre-1960s alignment of CA 198.  This is alignment is far more direct and was much closer to the Kaweah River.  Much of the asphalt surface is covered with dirt but it can be seen in places (along with white lane lines).
Photo IMG_2383:  Much of the pre-1960s alignment of CA 198 is covered with dirt from being under water but the grade is still easy to identify.
Photos IMG_2391, IMG_2393, IMG_2401 :  The pre-1960s alignment of CA 198 crosses Horse Creek and meets up with the older hillside alignment.  This bridge was covered in over a foot of debris but the road surface can be identified in places.  The date stamp for this bridge appears to be missing or is buried by dirt. 
Photo 13:  CA 198/LRN 10 on the 1935 Division of Highways Map of Tulare County in what is now Lake Kaweah.  The confluence of Horse Creek and the Kaweah River are where the previous photos were taken.

At some point I'll do a scan of the CHPW and Bridgehunter to see what I can find regarding these two bridges.  Likely the first bridge was replaced in the 1920s given most of the structures east of Lemon Cove were constructed during said decade.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2021, 07:06:55 PM »

Prepared a map of Lake Kaweah showing the differences in the alignments.  The blue line represents the original alignment of Legislative Route 10 which had a realignment project bid awarded in September of 1932.  The red line is the initial alignment of CA 198 through what is now Lake Kaweah. 

198 Lake KaweahX by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: CA 198
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2021, 10:50:07 PM »

Back during November of 2020 I caught word that the Lake Kaweah Reservoir was very low.  That being the case the original alignment of California State Route 198 and even older alignment of Legislative Route Number 10 could be accessed by foot.  I made my way out to the Lake Kaweah Reservoir to hike out to the two older highway alignments which included two largely intact bridges. 

https://www.gribblenation.org/2021/01/former-california-state-route-198-at.html
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