AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Missouri  (Read 22927 times)

roadman65

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11210
  • Location: Lakeland, Florida
  • Last Login: Today at 02:25:06 AM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #150 on: April 23, 2021, 11:27:26 PM »

Well Warrenton has money for the new recent August 2018 Dumbbell interchange at new Road West Warrenton Blvd.
http://www.warrenton-mo.org/government/city_departments/economic_development/new_interchange

I see already the parcels of land at the exchange are taken and the City of Warrenton is looking for  the new businesses already to open as that interchange is just a connector between the freeway and service roads.  Though signed as Route MM, the actual route is east of it along Boonestick Road into Main Street for Downtown.

Being 62 miles from St. Louis and 60 miles to Columbia, that city is banking on businesses to spawn its economy.   The city leveed a sales tax increase to fund it and it opened in 2018.   No state or federal money is used here. 
« Last Edit: April 23, 2021, 11:39:06 PM by roadman65 »
Logged
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

skluth

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1334
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Palm Springs, CA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:58:52 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #151 on: April 24, 2021, 11:27:59 AM »


(deleted because this is a tangent from that thread)

My guess is they used up their money on making MO 364 phase 1 10 lanes wide when traffic levels are low enough to be 6 lanes even 18 years after opening, and phase 2 8 lanes wide with an auxiliary lane, along with 2 frontage lanes in each direction. Would've been nice if they spent the money elsewhere, like the originally proposed SPUI design at US 40 and Brentwood. The current tight diamond have left turns onto the ramps backed up frequently from my experience.
There's a lot wrong from the 40/64 rebuild a little over a decade ago. My main complaint is keeping it at six lanes between I-170 and Forest Park. The roundabout at the Hampton entrance to Forest Park regularly backs up from Zoo traffic and screws up the SPUI at Hampton. The entire Brentwood/Hanley interchange.; I hated going through there every time I went to MicroCenter. It's better than it used to be with the free-flowing traffic at 64/170 and the full interchange at Big Bend. But it could have been much better.
Logged

roadman65

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11210
  • Location: Lakeland, Florida
  • Last Login: Today at 02:25:06 AM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #152 on: April 26, 2021, 09:05:39 AM »

I-70 across the state sees a lot of volume from my experiences driving it cross state. Florida would have it six lanes statewide and tolled express lanes in the St. Louis area. However Florida is years behind in suburban areas road growth though, but when it’s done it looks like present I-95 in South Florida.
Logged
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #153 on: May 05, 2021, 04:29:28 PM »

They've posted the Draft 2022-2026 STIP on the MODOT STIP site.

I have only looked through some of it. The projects for Future I-57 south of Poplar Bluff are listed in there. I haven't looked too closely at anything else so not sure if there were any other big projects on there.

https://www.modot.org/node/22735
Quote
Public Comment Period Opens on Statewide Transportation Improvement Program

JEFFERSON CITY – A draft 2022-2026 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) that focuses on taking care of the state’s existing transportation system was presented today to the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission. A 30-day public review and comment period begins today.

Missouri Department of Transportation Planning Director Eric Curtit told commissioners the draft STIP includes 1,417 highway and bridge projects, of which 84% will maintain the system in the condition it is in today. On average, this STIP annually invests in 740 lane miles of interstate pavements, 1,387 miles of major route pavements, 2,733 miles of minor route pavements and 277 bridges.

Missouri has the nation’s seventh largest state highway system with 33,832 miles of roadways and 10,397 bridges but ranks 45th nationally in revenue per mile.

“MoDOT’s priority is maintaining the existing system of highways and bridges,” Curtit said. “We have developed asset management plans for each district, which focus on preventive maintenance improvements to keep good roads and bridges in good condition. If preventive maintenance investments were not made, the cost of improving the asset in poor condition can cost four to ten times more.”

This STIP includes funding for the “Focus on Bridges” program that was initiated by Governor Parson and funded by the Missouri General Assembly in 2019. The first phase authorized $50 million in general revenue to expedite the repair and replacement of 45 bridges that had already been identified as some of the state’s top bridge priorities by local planning organizations. The second authorized $301 million in bonding – to be repaid over seven years from general revenue – to repair or replace another 215 bridges that had been previously prioritized, contingent on Missouri receiving a federal INFRA Grant to replace the I-70 Missouri River Bridge at Rocheport. Missouri received an $81.2 million INFRA Grant in July 2019, which triggered the first of two bond sales which occurred in November 2019. During 2020, 101 Focus on Bridges projects were completed and many more will be completed in 2021.

This STIP was developed assuming a federal funding level consistent with the last year of the FAST Act and includes the federal surface transportation funding provided by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA), which was enacted on Dec. 27, 2020. Other funding assumptions include redirected CARES Act monies and bond issuances in 2023 and 2026 to be repaid with dedicated motor vehicle sales tax revenue which is deposited in the State Road Bond Fund per the Amendment 3 legislation.

The STIP details an annual construction program that averages $1.1 billion per year for the five-year period. But it is insufficient to meet the state’s unfunded high-priority transportation needs that are estimated in MoDOT’s “Citizen’s Guide to Transportation Funding” at an additional $825 million per year.

“The STIP represents our commitment to Missourians of the projects that will be developed and delivered over the next five years,” MoDOT Director Patrick McKenna said.

The draft STIP also includes detailed project information for non-highway modes of transportation. It includes a section detailing planned operations and maintenance activities for the next three years, alongside expenditures for those same activities in the prior year. This additional information is provided to allow Missourians to more easily see how their transportation funding is invested.

The draft 2022-2026 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program lists transportation projects planned by state and regional planning agencies for fiscal years 2022 through 2026 (July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2026). The proposed program is available for public review. Those interested in seeing the program or offering comments can contact MoDOT by email to STIPcomments@modot.mo.gov, by calling customer service at 1-888-ASK-MoDOT (275-6636), or by mail to Transportation Planning, Program Comments, P.O. Box 270, Jefferson City, MO 65102. The program is also available on MoDOT's website: https://www.modot.org/DRAFTSTIP. The formal comment period ends June 4, 2021.

Following the public review period, the comments will be presented to the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission. The Commission will review the comments and the final transportation program before considering it for approval at its July meeting.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2021, 04:31:49 PM by mvak36 »
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #154 on: May 05, 2021, 09:23:36 PM »

https://www.modot.org/node/22746

Quote
Lehman-Wilson team selected to design, build 31 bridges in northern Missouri
All projects to be completed by Fall 2023


JEFFERSON CITY – The Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission today selected the Lehman-Wilson team for the design-build contract to replace 31 weight-restricted and poor condition bridges in northern Missouri over the next two and a half years through the Fixing Access to Rural Missouri (FARM) Bridge Program. It was made possible by the 2019 receipt of a $20.7 million federal grant under the Federal Highway Administration’s Competitive Highway Bridge Program.

Design-build is a project delivery method in which one contracting team is selected to design and build the highway improvement under one contract. MoDOT provides the project goals, budget and schedule and the contractor team completes the work. This technique has been known to significantly save time and provide cost savings.

The Lehman-Wilson team includes Lehman Construction Co. of California, Missouri and Wilson & Co. Engineers & Architects of Kansas City. “We were very pleased with the proposals submitted by these teams and are ready to make improvements on the transportation system in these rural areas,” said Missouri Department of Transportation Project Director Jeff Gander.

The project will replace deficient bridges on low-volume routes that are:

   
  • Weight-restricted
  • In poor condition
  • On timber pile
  • One-lane but carry two-way traffic

The full list of bridges to be replaced can be found on the FARM Bridge program web page.

“We’re proud to have been selected to build the bridges on the FARM Bridge Program and look forward to a good working relationship with MoDOT and the region,” said Lehman Construction owner Kenny Lehman.

The Lehman-Wilson team’s goal is to subcontract 6% of the construction and 12% of the professional and design activities to Disadvantaged Business Enterprise companies. Federal workforce goals also require that various percentages by county of those working on the project are minorities and 6.9% are female for all counties.

The next step in the design-build process is for Lehman-Wilson to fine-tune its design plans on the first set of bridges to be replaced. “We expect construction to begin later this fall,” Gander said, “and, depending on the level of winter we have, it is possible we could work straight through.”

He indicated each road will be closed at the bridge to speed up construction. “Message boards will be placed on these roads a few weeks before each closure, and we encourage residents in these areas to sign up to receive our email and text alerts,” he said. He added MoDOT will continue to send information and updates to local media for their distribution. MoDOT’s online traveler map also shows locations of work zones and road closures.

The oldest bridge to be replaced is on Route A in Worth County and was built in 1930.  (Photo attached)  The average age of these bridges is 80 years.
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #155 on: May 19, 2021, 10:40:44 AM »

Looks like the Missouri lawmakers passed a gas tax increase last week.

https://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article251341958.html

Now the (potentially) bad news: https://www.ky3.com/2021/05/17/proposal-would-put-missouri-gas-tax-hike-to-public-vote/

Quote
COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — A conservative advocacy group’s Missouri chapter is seeking to put what’s expected to be the state’s first gas tax hike in years to a public vote, a state official said Monday.

Jeremy Cady, who heads Americans for Prosperity-Missouri, filed a petition to put the newly passed gas tax increase to voters, the secretary of state said.

Legislators passed a bill last week to gradually raise the state’s 17-cent-a-gallon gas tax to 29.5 cents over five years, with the option for buyers to get a refund if they keep track of their receipts.

Gov. Mike Parson, who has long advocated to put more money toward fixing and maintaining the state’s roads and bridges, is expected to sign the bill into law.

....

Cady’s referendum petition is now open for public comment. If it’s approved, he can start trying to gather the millions of voter signatures needed to get it on the ballot in 2022.
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 19173
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: July 23, 2021, 06:50:58 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #156 on: May 19, 2021, 01:27:10 PM »

Bad news?  Yeah, who would want voters to have a say in things?  Stupid democracy.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. Dick
If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 12257
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 03:15:12 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Missouri
« Reply #157 on: May 19, 2021, 03:46:36 PM »

Bad news?  Yeah, who would want voters to have a say in things?  Stupid democracy.

I would be pretty leery of the Missouri government when they say they want a referendum on something. I don't follow MO politics very closely but I understand there have been a few recent cases where the legislature effectively voided the results of a referendum by refusing to provide funding to voter-approved initiatives, or rerunning referendums with slightly different ballot language until Jeff City gets what they want (while the voters are like "didn't I vote yes on this last time?").

For all its flaws, the Oklahoma legislature at least tends to grit its teeth and reluctantly implement voter referendums that go against the political orthodoxy at 23rd and Lincoln.
Logged

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #158 on: May 19, 2021, 09:43:08 PM »

Bad news?  Yeah, who would want voters to have a say in things?  Stupid democracy.

I would be pretty leery of the Missouri government when they say they want a referendum on something. I don't follow MO politics very closely but I understand there have been a few recent cases where the legislature effectively voided the results of a referendum by refusing to provide funding to voter-approved initiatives, or rerunning referendums with slightly different ballot language until Jeff City gets what they want (while the voters are like "didn't I vote yes on this last time?").

For all its flaws, the Oklahoma legislature at least tends to grit its teeth and reluctantly implement voter referendums that go against the political orthodoxy at 23rd and Lincoln.

I don't think it's the government that's doing the referendum. This looks its done by that AFP group.

I think they didn't need to do a public vote for this bill because the tax increase was under a certain amount (I think it's called the Hancock Amendment). Given how past referendums have gone, I would think this gas tax increase will probably get shot down.

FWIW, I was surprised that the MO Legislature actually passed something.

EDIT: After thinking about it more last night, I'm ok with it going to a public vote. I'd love to be proven wrong, but I think they're going to vote against the increase and they will be back to square one.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2021, 10:18:46 AM by mvak36 »
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

edwaleni

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1181
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 10:19:51 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #159 on: May 23, 2021, 04:31:13 PM »

I don't have any issues with gas tax increases as long as they are rational and used for highways. The fact many states haven't adjusted their fuel tax amounts to inflationary factors, which are more prevalent when they haven't been touched for more than 10-15 years is a big issue in strategic highway planning.

What I do have an issue with is the free ride some states are allowing for EV's. As long as EV's remained under a certain GVWR I didn't care so much.

But with Ford, Tesla and GM all coming out with EV trucks, and in the example the new EV Hummer weighs a very exceptional amount, (10,400 lbs) weight that will most definitely carry a road burden, this non-taxing is not sustainable.

So states either need to come up with a consumption tax for EV's that increment their support of road use or as some states do, make the buyer pay an "road impact fee" at purchase time.

The new Hummer is a *huge* EV and the batteries do weigh a lot.
Logged

skluth

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1334
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Palm Springs, CA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:58:52 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #160 on: May 23, 2021, 07:14:55 PM »

I don't have any issues with gas tax increases as long as they are rational and used for highways. The fact many states haven't adjusted their fuel tax amounts to inflationary factors, which are more prevalent when they haven't been touched for more than 10-15 years is a big issue in strategic highway planning.

What I do have an issue with is the free ride some states are allowing for EV's. As long as EV's remained under a certain GVWR I didn't care so much.

But with Ford, Tesla and GM all coming out with EV trucks, and in the example the new EV Hummer weighs a very exceptional amount, (10,400 lbs) weight that will most definitely carry a road burden, this non-taxing is not sustainable.

So states either need to come up with a consumption tax for EV's that increment their support of road use or as some states do, make the buyer pay an "road impact fee" at purchase time.

The new Hummer is a *huge* EV and the batteries do weigh a lot.

I hadn't thought about that when I was watching the news on the EV F-150 last week. Maybe this will be the push to come up with that fee (they'll never call it a tax) to properly account for their usage. We have to do this soon as more and more vehicles go electric. Last year, 6.2% of vehicles sold in California were EVs. It's only a little of 1% of total registered vehicles in California now. What happens by 2030.
Logged

edwaleni

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1181
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 10:19:51 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #161 on: May 24, 2021, 02:15:22 PM »

I don't have any issues with gas tax increases as long as they are rational and used for highways. The fact many states haven't adjusted their fuel tax amounts to inflationary factors, which are more prevalent when they haven't been touched for more than 10-15 years is a big issue in strategic highway planning.

What I do have an issue with is the free ride some states are allowing for EV's. As long as EV's remained under a certain GVWR I didn't care so much.

But with Ford, Tesla and GM all coming out with EV trucks, and in the example the new EV Hummer weighs a very exceptional amount, (10,400 lbs) weight that will most definitely carry a road burden, this non-taxing is not sustainable.

So states either need to come up with a consumption tax for EV's that increment their support of road use or as some states do, make the buyer pay an "road impact fee" at purchase time.

The new Hummer is a *huge* EV and the batteries do weigh a lot.

I hadn't thought about that when I was watching the news on the EV F-150 last week. Maybe this will be the push to come up with that fee (they'll never call it a tax) to properly account for their usage. We have to do this soon as more and more vehicles go electric. Last year, 6.2% of vehicles sold in California were EVs. It's only a little of 1% of total registered vehicles in California now. What happens by 2030.

I saw a byline the other day saying that state DMV's are trying to figure out how to classify these Hummer EV's. Technically since trucks are licensed and registered by weight, some think the Hummer will end up being a Class C or Class D truck.
Logged

Revive 755

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4359
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 10:52:38 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #162 on: June 24, 2021, 10:53:10 PM »

MoDOT is going to have a virtual public meeting to remove the I-44 interchange with MO 66:  See https://www.modot.org/node/23221
Logged

US71

  • Road Scholar , Master of Snark
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11053
  • Mad man with a camera

  • Age: 61
  • Location: On the road again
  • Last Login: Today at 02:38:20 PM
    • The Road Less Taken
Re: Missouri
« Reply #163 on: June 25, 2021, 11:28:29 AM »

MoDOT is going to have a virtual public meeting to remove the I-44 interchange with MO 66:  See https://www.modot.org/node/23221

Big mistake, IMO
Logged
Like Alice I Try To Believe Three Impossible Things Before Breakfast

rte66man

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1479
  • Location: Warr Acres, OK
  • Last Login: July 07, 2021, 06:43:44 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #164 on: June 25, 2021, 12:18:01 PM »

MoDOT is going to have a virtual public meeting to remove the I-44 interchange with MO 66:  See https://www.modot.org/node/23221

Big mistake, IMO

Why on earth do they want to take it out?
Logged
When you come to a fork in the road... TAKE IT.

                                                               -Yogi Berra

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 12257
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 03:15:12 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Missouri
« Reply #165 on: June 25, 2021, 03:41:45 PM »

It doesn't say, since the "meeting" hasn't "started" yet (can they not just post the documents anyway?) But my guess is that it's redundant with the Prigmor interchange and they want to reduce the maintenance liability.
Logged

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #166 on: July 01, 2021, 05:05:46 PM »

https://www.komu.com/news/midmissourinews/modot-highway-commission-announces-contactor-for-new-rocheport-bridge/article_7046372a-da7a-11eb-b3bc-1b7541747bdf.html

Quote
JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission announced the Lunda Team as the official design-build contractor team for the Interstate 70 Missouri River Bridge near Rocheport on Thursday afternoon.

The team consists of Lunda Construction Co., Parsons Transportation Group, Inc., Dan Brown & Associates and Hugh Zeng United. Lunda's headquarters are in Wisconsin, Parsons' is in Virginia but has a St. Louis office, Dan Brown & Associates is from Tennessee and High Zeng United is headquartered in Minnesota.

The announcement took place at noon at MoDOT Headquarters in Jefferson City.

"This is an exciting moment for this project, and we are thrilled to be working with the Lunda Team," MoDOT Rocheport Bridge Project Director Brandi Baldwin said. "The replacement of the bridge provides a long-lasting solution and the plan will have minimal impacts to traffic on I-70 during construction."

....
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #167 on: July 02, 2021, 11:00:03 AM »

Another article on the I-70 Rocheport Bridge project: https://www.columbiatribune.com/story/news/local/2021/07/01/lunda-awarded-modot-contract-rocheport-bridge-construction-interstate-highway-70-infrastructure/7824558002/

Quote
....

Construction is expected to start this fall, with the entire project taking up to three years.

What set Lunda apart was its plan to build two separate bridges as part of the project, MoDOT Project Director Brandi Baldwin said.

The first bridge will be constructed north of the current Rocheport Bridge. Once that is complete by spring 2023, that new bridge will open and all traffic will be routed there.

This means the current bridge will have one less year of maintenance costs, as it will be demolished to make way for the second bridge.

"The existing bridge we have concerns with will be out of service a full year ahead of schedule, so we take that maintenance concern off the table," Baldwin said.

The new eastbound and westbound bridges each will be three lanes, with eight- and 12-foot shoulders once construction is completed by Dec. 31, 2024.

Once the first new bridge opens in 2023, it will support four lanes of traffic — two eastbound and two westbound — during construction of the second bridge.

Going forward, the two-bridge setup will benefit motorists because when there are maintenance needs, MoDOT can close one bridge completely and still have relatively minimal impact on traffic.

The decision to make each new bridge three lanes was made with an eye to the future and the hope I-70 can be expanded to a total of six lanes, Baldwin said.

"(We are) keeping our eye on the future since this is a bridge that will be in place for 100 years," Baldwin said.
....
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

SkyPesos

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2450
  • definition of pain: I-75

  • Age: 18
  • Location: Area Code 513
  • Last Login: Today at 01:43:02 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #168 on: July 02, 2021, 11:09:50 AM »

Good thing that they're making it 6 lanes. Considering that it's MoDOT, I was sort of expecting them to do 4 lanes on the new bridge with no room for expansion.
Logged
Traveled 2di: 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 24, 26, 29, 35, 39, 40, 44, 55, 57, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 83, 84, 85, 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95
Cities I've lived in: Cincinnati, Columbus (OH), St Louis, Fuzhou
My Fictional Highways Thread

skluth

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1334
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Palm Springs, CA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:58:52 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #169 on: July 02, 2021, 05:37:00 PM »

This is the MODOT link for the announcement

Quote
MoDOT Selects Contractor for the Design-Build of New I-70 Rocheport Bridge
Project: I-70 Rocheport Bridge Replacement

JEFFERSON CITY – Today the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission announced the selection of the Lunda Team, made up of Lunda Construction Co., Parsons Transportation Group, Inc., Dan Brown & Associates, and Hugh Zeng United, as the design-build contractor to replace the Interstate 70 Missouri River Bridge near Rocheport.

“This is an exciting moment for this project, and we are thrilled to be working with the Lunda Team,” said Missouri Department of Transportation Rocheport Bridge Project Director Brandi Baldwin. “The replacement of the bridge provides a long-lasting solution and the plan will have minimal impacts to traffic on I-70 during construction.”

The current bridge was built in 1960 and is rated as being in poor condition, which could have resulted in weight restrictions in the coming years. MoDOT said the 60-year-old bridge is safe and will be maintained while construction of the new bridge is underway.

The new Missouri River bridge will cost approximately $240 million and will provide a safe and reliable bridge for interstate travelers for the next 100 years. It was funded in part by an $81.2 million INFRA Grant, the largest competitive grant ever received by MoDOT.

“This bridge lies at the heart of Missouri and not only connects the two sides of our state but the majority of our country,” Governor Parson said. “With over 12 million vehicles using the bridge each year and trucks carrying goods to all corners of the country, it is vital that we have world-class infrastructure in place that can meet the demand. This new bridge will keep people moving safely and drive economic activity in our state and local communities.”

 “This announcement is the culmination of a lot of hard work and dedication by a large group of people dedicated to Missouri’s transportation system and infrastructure,” said MoDOT Director Patrick McKenna. “It required local communities, state lawmakers and our congressional delegation all working towards that shared vision of a new bridge that made the funding come together.”

The Lunda Team competed against three other design build teams, all of whom had local and national experience. The winning proposal showed not only an understanding of the engineering endeavor set out before the teams and a design that will serve travelers for the next century, it also showed an understanding of the local, statewide, and national importance of the work.

The design includes two bridges, one in each direction of travel, each with three lanes. This allows for construction to take place with a limited impact to traffic.

The design-build team’s proposal had to meet or exceed several goals set by MoDOT, which included providing a high-quality, durable, low-maintenance project that improves safety and reliability, minimizing traffic impacts during and after construction, and demonstrating a commitment to quality and innovation in all phases of the project.

Construction on the new bridge is scheduled to begin later this year and be complete by the end of 2024. 

For more information or to sign up for updates sent to your inbox, visit the project webpage at www.modot.org/rocheportbridge. For instant updates, follow MoDOT Central on Twitter or share posts and comments on our Facebook at www.facebook.com/MoDOTCentral. The Central District maintains more than 11,000 miles of state roadway in 18 counties.
Logged

I-39

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1608
  • Last Login: July 23, 2021, 10:36:16 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #170 on: July 02, 2021, 10:33:26 PM »

Another article on the I-70 Rocheport Bridge project: https://www.columbiatribune.com/story/news/local/2021/07/01/lunda-awarded-modot-contract-rocheport-bridge-construction-interstate-highway-70-infrastructure/7824558002/

Quote
....

Construction is expected to start this fall, with the entire project taking up to three years.

What set Lunda apart was its plan to build two separate bridges as part of the project, MoDOT Project Director Brandi Baldwin said.

The first bridge will be constructed north of the current Rocheport Bridge. Once that is complete by spring 2023, that new bridge will open and all traffic will be routed there.

This means the current bridge will have one less year of maintenance costs, as it will be demolished to make way for the second bridge.

"The existing bridge we have concerns with will be out of service a full year ahead of schedule, so we take that maintenance concern off the table," Baldwin said.

The new eastbound and westbound bridges each will be three lanes, with eight- and 12-foot shoulders once construction is completed by Dec. 31, 2024.

Once the first new bridge opens in 2023, it will support four lanes of traffic — two eastbound and two westbound — during construction of the second bridge.

Going forward, the two-bridge setup will benefit motorists because when there are maintenance needs, MoDOT can close one bridge completely and still have relatively minimal impact on traffic.

The decision to make each new bridge three lanes was made with an eye to the future and the hope I-70 can be expanded to a total of six lanes, Baldwin said.

"(We are) keeping our eye on the future since this is a bridge that will be in place for 100 years," Baldwin said.
....

Any word on widening the rest of the Interstate to six lanes across the state?
Logged

mvak36

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1035
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:39 PM
Re: Missouri
« Reply #171 on: July 03, 2021, 07:31:35 AM »

Another article on the I-70 Rocheport Bridge project: https://www.columbiatribune.com/story/news/local/2021/07/01/lunda-awarded-modot-contract-rocheport-bridge-construction-interstate-highway-70-infrastructure/7824558002/

Quote
....

Construction is expected to start this fall, with the entire project taking up to three years.

What set Lunda apart was its plan to build two separate bridges as part of the project, MoDOT Project Director Brandi Baldwin said.

The first bridge will be constructed north of the current Rocheport Bridge. Once that is complete by spring 2023, that new bridge will open and all traffic will be routed there.

This means the current bridge will have one less year of maintenance costs, as it will be demolished to make way for the second bridge.

"The existing bridge we have concerns with will be out of service a full year ahead of schedule, so we take that maintenance concern off the table," Baldwin said.

The new eastbound and westbound bridges each will be three lanes, with eight- and 12-foot shoulders once construction is completed by Dec. 31, 2024.

Once the first new bridge opens in 2023, it will support four lanes of traffic — two eastbound and two westbound — during construction of the second bridge.

Going forward, the two-bridge setup will benefit motorists because when there are maintenance needs, MoDOT can close one bridge completely and still have relatively minimal impact on traffic.

The decision to make each new bridge three lanes was made with an eye to the future and the hope I-70 can be expanded to a total of six lanes, Baldwin said.

"(We are) keeping our eye on the future since this is a bridge that will be in place for 100 years," Baldwin said.
....

Any word on widening the rest of the Interstate to six lanes across the state?
I haven’t heard anything. I know they mentioned it in passing in that article. Hopefully if an infrastructure bill passes, they will have funding for a few sections at least.
Logged
Counties: Counties visited
Travel Mapping: Summary

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.