Regional Boards > Northeast

I-95/Penna Turnpike Interchange

<< < (579/581) > >>

famartin:

--- Quote from: jp the roadgeek on July 18, 2021, 06:05:53 PM ---I also have a set with I-95 mileage.  For continuity’s sake, I would just assume keep a consistent system of exit numbers on I-95 up to the GWB rather than jump down from 112 to 72 between Route 3 and US 46 if you went with NJTP mileage.  Yes, there would be a jump down from 51 to 7 Northbound between current Exits 6 and 7 on the mainline if you used I-95 mileage for exits north of there, but at least SB would have the mainline be Exit 6 (happens to work out nicely) so you’re “warned” that you’re no longer on I-95 before the jump to 44 for current Exit 5.

Most traffic uses that exit to go southbound on the parkway when exiting from the NJTP southbound, hence my two longer distance destinations.  For northbound signage, I use Woodbridge and Perth Amboy. I use a similar convention for current Exit 10 (287/440): Morristown and Staten Island NB, Piscataway and Perth Amboy SB

--- End quote ---

It depends, and maybe there's been a change in patterns, but when I was a kid, we'd routinely take the Turnpike north to the Parkway north to the Thruway north. So, not sure avoiding the northbound parkway control cities that are further along would be relevant. NJTA doesn't like altering signage depending on direction (otherwise, they'd not use Trenton on Exit 7 SB or Exit 7A NB).

paul02474:

--- Quote from: famartin on July 18, 2021, 05:32:30 PM ---
--- Quote from: jp the roadgeek on July 18, 2021, 04:59:52 PM ---Here are some I designed in my collection.  These use NJTP mileage for the mileage based exits (the NJTP thru route would be numbered using I-95 mileage).  The one from the Thruway uses I-87 mileage.



--- End quote ---

Shouldn't there be a northbound control city on exit 91? Those are both south. Right now the parkway uses Paterson and Newark, I believe.

Also, since the PIP exit is actually beyond NJTA jurisdiction (its PANYNJ there), good luck getting them to use NJTA mileage.

--- End quote ---

Nice, but I would quarrel with the New City NY control city for the PIP. The obvious choice is Bear Mountain. Nanuet is marginally acceptable, but still unBEARable.

PHLBOS:

--- Quote from: famartin on July 17, 2021, 11:37:01 AM ---
--- Quote from: PHLBOS on July 17, 2021, 08:44:18 AM ---
--- Quote from: famartin on July 16, 2021, 12:01:06 AM ---There are few things PTC does better than NJTA, but this is one of those few things. I wish NJTA would’ve done it this way. Oh well.


--- End quote ---
Guess on my part, and Alps can verify/confirm; NJTA (or at least their specs) doesn't allow the displaying of toll-road shields for other independent toll facilities on their main/primary signage.  It certainly would explain why there's no PA Turnpike keystone shield on any NJTA-spec signage. 
To further prove the above-point; this NJDOT-spec'd sign along US 130 approaching the I-95 interchange features a PA Turnpike shield on it.  Obviously, NJDOT (as well as the PTC & PennDOT) has no such prohibition.

Such would also explain why the recent GSP's interchange with the ACX features no ACX shields on the signs whereas the prior-generation signage did; when the GSP was an NJHA facility.  The NJHA merged into the NJTA circa 2003.

Conversely, prior I-95/NJTP signage for Exit 11 featured no GSP shield but the new ones do.  The former predated the GSP becoming an NJTA run-facility.

--- End quote ---

Your guess is the same as mine, but its only that. Confirmation would be nice, but yes, all the evidence seems to suggest the NJTA just simply won't use other authority blazers. I wonder if its a copyright thing or something.

--- End quote ---
Another guess on my part, and such might be an old regulation standard that nobody since reviewed, displaying another agency's shield on their (NJTA's) signs would give the perception of advertising.

True story: when I worked on the National Park Service (NPS) plans that redeveloped 2 of the blocks north of Independence Hall in Philadelphia many years ago; the direction the consulting firms received was to not include the listing of their firm(s) on the plan title blocks, which would show on every sheet the firm(s) were responsible for, but only list it on the second or third plan sheet from the top.  I was told by the lead architect firm involved with the project; that the NPS viewed the practice of placing firm(s) names on multiple plan sheets was, in NPS' eyes, a form of advertising.

Again, speculation; maybe the NJTA had a similar sentiment that the NPS did. 

famartin:

--- Quote from: PHLBOS on July 21, 2021, 09:37:22 PM ---
--- Quote from: famartin on July 17, 2021, 11:37:01 AM ---
--- Quote from: PHLBOS on July 17, 2021, 08:44:18 AM ---
--- Quote from: famartin on July 16, 2021, 12:01:06 AM ---There are few things PTC does better than NJTA, but this is one of those few things. I wish NJTA would’ve done it this way. Oh well.


--- End quote ---
Guess on my part, and Alps can verify/confirm; NJTA (or at least their specs) doesn't allow the displaying of toll-road shields for other independent toll facilities on their main/primary signage.  It certainly would explain why there's no PA Turnpike keystone shield on any NJTA-spec signage. 
To further prove the above-point; this NJDOT-spec'd sign along US 130 approaching the I-95 interchange features a PA Turnpike shield on it.  Obviously, NJDOT (as well as the PTC & PennDOT) has no such prohibition.

Such would also explain why the recent GSP's interchange with the ACX features no ACX shields on the signs whereas the prior-generation signage did; when the GSP was an NJHA facility.  The NJHA merged into the NJTA circa 2003.

Conversely, prior I-95/NJTP signage for Exit 11 featured no GSP shield but the new ones do.  The former predated the GSP becoming an NJTA run-facility.

--- End quote ---

Your guess is the same as mine, but its only that. Confirmation would be nice, but yes, all the evidence seems to suggest the NJTA just simply won't use other authority blazers. I wonder if its a copyright thing or something.

--- End quote ---
Another guess on my part, and such might be an old regulation standard that nobody since reviewed, displaying another agency's shield on their (NJTA's) signs would give the perception of advertising.

True story: when I worked on the National Park Service (NPS) plans that redeveloped 2 of the blocks north of Independence Hall in Philadelphia many years ago; the direction the consulting firms received was to not include the listing of their firm(s) on the plan title blocks, which would show on every sheet the firm(s) were responsible for, but only list it on the second or third plan sheet from the top.  I was told by the lead architect firm involved with the project; that the NPS viewed the practice of placing firm(s) names on multiple plan sheets was, in NPS' eyes, a form of advertising.

Again, speculation; maybe the NJTA had a similar sentiment that the NPS did.

--- End quote ---

Possible. Just surprising given they are essentially partner agencies (since they share the bridge).

jeffandnicole:

--- Quote from: famartin on July 21, 2021, 10:29:32 PM ---
--- Quote from: PHLBOS on July 21, 2021, 09:37:22 PM ---
--- Quote from: famartin on July 17, 2021, 11:37:01 AM ---
--- Quote from: PHLBOS on July 17, 2021, 08:44:18 AM ---
--- Quote from: famartin on July 16, 2021, 12:01:06 AM ---There are few things PTC does better than NJTA, but this is one of those few things. I wish NJTA would’ve done it this way. Oh well.


--- End quote ---
Guess on my part, and Alps can verify/confirm; NJTA (or at least their specs) doesn't allow the displaying of toll-road shields for other independent toll facilities on their main/primary signage.  It certainly would explain why there's no PA Turnpike keystone shield on any NJTA-spec signage. 
To further prove the above-point; this NJDOT-spec'd sign along US 130 approaching the I-95 interchange features a PA Turnpike shield on it.  Obviously, NJDOT (as well as the PTC & PennDOT) has no such prohibition.

Such would also explain why the recent GSP's interchange with the ACX features no ACX shields on the signs whereas the prior-generation signage did; when the GSP was an NJHA facility.  The NJHA merged into the NJTA circa 2003.

Conversely, prior I-95/NJTP signage for Exit 11 featured no GSP shield but the new ones do.  The former predated the GSP becoming an NJTA run-facility.

--- End quote ---

Your guess is the same as mine, but its only that. Confirmation would be nice, but yes, all the evidence seems to suggest the NJTA just simply won't use other authority blazers. I wonder if its a copyright thing or something.

--- End quote ---
Another guess on my part, and such might be an old regulation standard that nobody since reviewed, displaying another agency's shield on their (NJTA's) signs would give the perception of advertising.

True story: when I worked on the National Park Service (NPS) plans that redeveloped 2 of the blocks north of Independence Hall in Philadelphia many years ago; the direction the consulting firms received was to not include the listing of their firm(s) on the plan title blocks, which would show on every sheet the firm(s) were responsible for, but only list it on the second or third plan sheet from the top.  I was told by the lead architect firm involved with the project; that the NPS viewed the practice of placing firm(s) names on multiple plan sheets was, in NPS' eyes, a form of advertising.

Again, speculation; maybe the NJTA had a similar sentiment that the NPS did.

--- End quote ---

Possible. Just surprising given they are essentially partner agencies (since they share the bridge).

--- End quote ---

Considering it advertising may be a little far fetched, being that the NJ Turnpike lists "Penn Turnpike" as a control city on their signage.

Remember: The NJ Turnpike shield is THE route "number" for about half the Turnpike. The PA Turnpike mainline has regular Interstate route numbers across its entire length.

The NJ Turnpike is also a much more recognized highway shield than most other toll road shields.
Most people probably aren't familiar with the Penna Turnpike keystone shield. If we were to look at Delaware, they have all but retired the Delaware Turnpike shield and just solely use the I-95 shield.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version