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Rothman:
I'd imagine speed is a significant factor in how far a vehicle can intrude into a work zone and thus be a danger to workers.

Truth be told, I don't know how I feel about the new pilot camera enforcement, other than I know it has been allowed in other states and therefore legal arguments against it are pretty moot.  It also sounds like the next step in evolution from NY's Operation Hard Hats (targeted work zone enforcement by State Police).  Devil will always be in the details.

empirestate:

--- Quote from: kalvado on September 10, 2021, 07:27:40 AM ---The question is what are we trying to achieve with these speed limits.

--- End quote ---

In this case, we're just trying to achieve a regulation that doesn't require unnecessary slowing for work zones when they are not being used to do work.


--- Quote from: kalvado on September 10, 2021, 07:27:40 AM ---If actual safety is at stake, most work zones I see have trucks with flashing lights parked a bit upstream. Since workers typically do not just walk into the work site, they typically arrive in one of those vehicles equipped with lights and what not. So active equipment definition would work just fine.
--- End quote ---

You mean, defining active equipment as the display of flashing caution lights? That would certainly be less subjective, and more similar to other existing laws (like those for school buses and emergency vehicles).

It would also be fairly similar to the below:


--- Quote from: jemacedo9 on September 10, 2021, 08:36:21 AM ---PA changed its work zone laws back in 2014. the "ACTIVE WORK ZONE WHEN FLASHING" sign was introduced with a little white light at the top.
--- End quote ---

That's not [/i]quite[/i] the same thing as "when workers are present", but probably a much more practical solution than "it's a work zone if you see people doing stuff."

Rothman:
I do like the active work zone signs in PA, but when they're not flashing, it can cause minor confusion.  Still better than "when workers present" or similar phrases used in other states.

kalvado:

--- Quote from: Rothman on September 10, 2021, 09:34:20 AM ---I'd imagine speed is a significant factor in how far a vehicle can intrude into a work zone and thus be a danger to workers.

Truth be told, I don't know how I feel about the new pilot camera enforcement, other than I know it has been allowed in other states and therefore legal arguments against it are pretty moot.  It also sounds like the next step in evolution from NY's Operation Hard Hats (targeted work zone enforcement by State Police).  Devil will always be in the details.

--- End quote ---
Still, you touched a pretty interesting topic which I am digging a bit into.
Looking at the data, NY reports 35.5% ratio of workzone worker fatalities to number of fatalities in workzone crashes (all numbers are 9 or 10 years averages). Importantly, worker fatalities are a BLS number including con-crash fatalities. Same number in PA is 28.6%, 10.5% in TX and 18% nationally.
Gap between TX and NY  fatalities goes from 136:6.5 to 14:2.7.
Somehow my best explanation is how crashes in abandoned work zones are accounted for. Overall higher road fatality rate in the south is yet another story I don't understand.

Flyer78:

--- Quote from: jemacedo9 on September 10, 2021, 08:36:21 AM ---...
Most times, the use of the white light seems accurate.  Not always. I don't know how widespread these are being used now, however.

--- End quote ---

Pretty common at least on major projects (Turnpike, Interstates at least) - and the camera enforcement here requires at least two "Active Photo Enforced" signs before the "Enforcement Vehicle" (with an amusingly small sign) can grab your picture. Seems to get the job done, slow people down, if only long enough to pass that point.

PA also has "Covid-19 Safety Plan in Effect" signs... I guess that's ... nice?

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