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Author Topic: Oregon  (Read 58455 times)

Hurricane Rex

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Oregon
« on: December 12, 2017, 06:15:33 PM »

General Overview:

I'm creating this thread to create a general board where if anyone finds a small roadway related project in Oregon they want to post, they can do so here.

If it is a major project like the Newberg-Dundee Bypass, another revival of the CRC, or most significant Portland freeway expansions (the auxiliary lanes on I-205/I-5 don't count). If it is a speed limit increase statewide, there will be enough people wanting to respond to that to create its own thread based on the last couple of topics on it.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 11:35:02 PM by Hurricane Rex »
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Bickendan

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2017, 06:20:52 PM »

The reminder is wholly unnecessary and there's no need to do my job for me.  As it is,  a general Oregon thread hasn't particularly been needed as there aren't a dearth of projects; individual threads have served quite well to meet the need.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2017, 11:12:16 PM by Bickendan »
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Hurricane Rex

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2017, 06:23:06 PM »

The reminder is wholly unnecessary and there's no need to do my job for me.  As it is,  a general Oregon thread hasn't particularly been needed as there aren't a dearth of projects; individual threads have served quite well to meet the need.

Thought I'd try. If you want to delete the thread, go ahead.
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Alps

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2017, 06:44:47 PM »

I think it's worthwhile to have a thread. I started a thread for New Jersey years ago in the same conditions and it's blossomed since. There will be a lot of little things to throw in here.
I also don't think an official moderator warning was necessary, but what do I know?

Bickendan

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 11:12:55 PM »

The reminder is wholly unnecessary and there's no need to do my job for me.  As it is,  a general Oregon thread hasn't particularly been needed as there aren't a dearth of projects; individual threads have served quite well to meet the need.

Thought I'd try. If you want to delete the thread, go ahead.
I don't have a problem with the thread per se. It's up, make use of it ;)
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mrsman

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2017, 01:13:27 PM »

FWIW, I believe there are good reasons to have state specific threads.  As it is, there isn't much traffic on the whole PNW boards anyway so it isn't as though Oregon stuff will get lost in the shuffle.

But is some of the western boards get merged, it would be a good idea to keep each state separate.
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Hurricane Rex

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2018, 08:42:21 PM »

I 84 crash if anyone cares: http://www.kgw.com/mobile/article/news/local/bystanders-rescue-driver-after-semi-crashes-into-columbia-river/283-508301440

Could see NIMBY's and the "one reluctant I" to want to put back the 65T55 limit or worse, 60T55 like said person wants.
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nexus73

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 12:52:57 AM »

Here's some projects going on in the area I travel in.

US 20 Eddyville Bypass: The west end was finished in late 2017.  There was a decent sized cut that needed to be made for the last small section to be added in.  Right now I would rate US 20's quality as a route from the coast to inland destinations as very good.  There is just one 35 MPH curve which is not overly severe on the part between the Bypass and Toledo, which is an amazing change from what there used to be.

SR 62 Bypass: ODOT messed up by not adding in interchanges so this bypass would serve as a way for trucks to serve the backside of the commercial zones along 62 but otherwise it is shaping up to be a decent roadway.  Given that the ADT count on 62 was over 100K and exceeded I-5's flow, I am surprised that ODOT did not connect the Bypass to I-5 and call it I-x05.  This project is scheduled for completion later this year.

SR 38: Multiple culverts are being replaced through this year.  Right now two areas have one lane traffic controlled by traffic lights.  Next year is when the start of the new Scottsburg bridge will take place. 

US 101: Bridge maintenance continues in Florence, Reedsport, North Bend and a few miles north of Brookings where the highest bridge in Oregon is located.  Port Orford went from 4-lane to 3-lane with more sections of that coming to Reedsport and Bandon.  A small section of 4-lane 101 south of Brookings will lose one lane as a center turn lane is created with the plan being to add it back in when money to do a widening comes in.

With this being a very mild winter compared to last year's torrential downpours and colder weather, the central and south coast of 101 has held together quite well.  US 20, SR 126, SR 38 and SR 42 have had no problems.

Eugene: The bus lane project from downtown Eugene to west Eugene that runs along SR 99/126 and 126 is now completed.  There is a small transit mall on the west end of the project.  What is unusual is how there are sections dedicated to the buses with other parts having nothing on the western section of the project.  Hopefully those larger transit bus drivers don't have too many problems dealing with the traffic.

SR 540 South Empire Boulevard-Coos Bay: This street improvement project was completed in late 2017.  The lighting is very bright on this section.  What remains to be done is finishing the sewage treatment plant that is on this street so one still has to watch out for trucks.  The plant is scheduled to be completed late this year.

Right now that's all I know about road goings on over here.  Hopefully as time passes more Oregonians and those who travel through this state will post up news of what they see taking place!

Rick
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:55:48 AM by nexus73 »
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Re: Oregon
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2018, 08:52:23 PM »

Eugene: The bus lane project from downtown Eugene to west Eugene that runs along SR 99/126 and 126 is now completed.  There is a small transit mall on the west end of the project.  What is unusual is how there are sections dedicated to the buses with other parts having nothing on the western section of the project.  Hopefully those larger transit bus drivers don't have too many problems dealing with the traffic.

Generally, new bus lanes are only built across areas that have the worst congestion problems for buses. In areas with less traffic, buses can operate in mixed lanes to save on project costs and cut down on public backlash to the lanes. I understand that the west extension was more than a little contentious politically, so I think LTD made a good call in limiting the scope of the bus-only sections.

nexus73

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2018, 12:53:13 AM »

Eugene: The bus lane project from downtown Eugene to west Eugene that runs along SR 99/126 and 126 is now completed.  There is a small transit mall on the west end of the project.  What is unusual is how there are sections dedicated to the buses with other parts having nothing on the western section of the project.  Hopefully those larger transit bus drivers don't have too many problems dealing with the traffic.

Generally, new bus lanes are only built across areas that have the worst congestion problems for buses. In areas with less traffic, buses can operate in mixed lanes to save on project costs and cut down on public backlash to the lanes. I understand that the west extension was more than a little contentious politically, so I think LTD made a good call in limiting the scope of the bus-only sections.

W. 11th is very congested so I do not think your take is correct.  If you had personally followed the projects for bus lanes over the course of years in Eugene as I have, you would know better.  What the deal is: Two pounds of sh*t in a one pound bag.  There was not that much room to work with on W. 11th.  As far as I am concerned, the engineering side did all they could do within the limitations of space and finances.  Were the job to be done properly, it would have required the removal of the south side blocks along W. 11th and that would have been quite expensive although the traffic flow situation would have been solved by using a superboulevard design with a frontage road on the south side with enough room remaining for a continuous bus lane.

As for political contentiousness, yes, there was plenty of that.  Before we had the bus lane project. ODOT had planned and set aside money for the West Eugene Parkway.  This project was even subject to a public vote and it barely won but it was still a win until the liberals of Eugene did their usual crap by being progressives against progress and brought the whole shebang to a halt despite the democratic process having gone against them.  ODOT took the millions they had set aside for this needed project and spent them elsewhere as a result.  W 11th is still heavily congested. 

Rick
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Hurricane Rex

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2018, 02:02:01 AM »

Portland is now 20 on most roads now. Another effect of the vision zero failure.
http://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2018/01/portland_speed_limits_vote_20.html
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Bruce

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2018, 06:28:12 PM »

Portland is now 20 on most roads now. Another effect of the vision zero failure.
http://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2018/01/portland_speed_limits_vote_20.html

What's the criteria for failure? Not enough vehicle-related fatalities and injuries on city streets that are teeming with people on foot? You don't need to be going any faster than 20 mph on residential back streets.

Hurricane Rex

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2018, 08:09:12 PM »

Portland is now 20 on most roads now. Another effect of the vision zero failure.
http://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2018/01/portland_speed_limits_vote_20.html

What's the criteria for failure? Not enough vehicle-related fatalities and injuries on city streets that are teeming with people on foot? You don't need to be going any faster than 20 mph on residential back streets.
Believe it or not, I actually want people to slow down in neighborhoods but the problem is when a speed limit is lowered, most drivers don't change their habits. Also Portpsnd PD has come out saying they won't do any increased patrols or anything special to enforce the 20 mph limit.

Why vision zero will fail: If your goal was just as close to 0 as possible, that is reasonable. What most plans have done: 0 deaths on the road by 2030 (12 years). With distracted driving, drunk driving also prevalent causes, I don't see any money going to that and people will still do it. We all know a lot of drivers who don't pay attention to the road. This doesn't even include weather related traffic deaths.
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Bruce

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2018, 09:38:18 PM »

Portland is now 20 on most roads now. Another effect of the vision zero failure.
http://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2018/01/portland_speed_limits_vote_20.html

What's the criteria for failure? Not enough vehicle-related fatalities and injuries on city streets that are teeming with people on foot? You don't need to be going any faster than 20 mph on residential back streets.
Believe it or not, I actually want people to slow down in neighborhoods but the problem is when a speed limit is lowered, most drivers don't change their habits. Also Portpsnd PD has come out saying they won't do any increased patrols or anything special to enforce the 20 mph limit.

Why vision zero will fail: If your goal was just as close to 0 as possible, that is reasonable. What most plans have done: 0 deaths on the road by 2030 (12 years). With distracted driving, drunk driving also prevalent causes, I don't see any money going to that and people will still do it. We all know a lot of drivers who don't pay attention to the road. This doesn't even include weather related traffic deaths.

The goal is zero preventable deaths related to traffic incidents. This means taking engineering actions to build safer roads for all users (forcing drivers to slow down, clearing sight lines, building bicycle facilities), stepping up much needed enforcement, training better commercial drivers, and having reasonable transportation options for those who can't drive.

Hurricane Rex

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2018, 01:48:57 AM »

Portland is now 20 on most roads now. Another effect of the vision zero failure.
http://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2018/01/portland_speed_limits_vote_20.html

What's the criteria for failure? Not enough vehicle-related fatalities and injuries on city streets that are teeming with people on foot? You don't need to be going any faster than 20 mph on residential back streets.
Believe it or not, I actually want people to slow down in neighborhoods but the problem is when a speed limit is lowered, most drivers don't change their habits. Also, Portland PD has come out saying they won't do any increased patrols or anything special to enforce the 20 mph limit.

Why vision zero will fail: If your goal was just as close to 0 as possible, that is reasonable. What most plans have done: 0 deaths on the road by 2030 (12 years). With distracted driving, drunk driving also prevalent causes, I don't see any money going to that and people will still do it. We all know a lot of drivers who don't pay attention to the road. This doesn't even include weather related traffic deaths.

The goal is zero preventable deaths related to traffic incidents. This means taking engineering actions to build safer roads for all users (forcing drivers to slow down, clearing sight lines, building bicycle facilities), stepping up much-needed enforcement, training better commercial drivers, and having reasonable transportation options for those who can't drive.

Portland's vision zero website says nothing about predictable that I could see, also it's 2025, not 2030 like I thought. Plus weather-related and distracted driving is predictable.

Vision Zero is the goal to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2025.
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compdude787

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2018, 05:22:07 PM »

Vision Zero is nothing but pie-in-the-sky idealism. It won't happen until 100% of cars on the roads are self-driving and I'm pretty sure that's not going to be the case in 2030. Reducing speeds will only increase distracted driving. I find that I get less focused on the road when I'm driving at a slower speed.

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2018, 09:51:07 PM »

Vision Zero is nothing but pie-in-the-sky idealism. It won't happen until 100% of cars on the roads are self-driving and I'm pretty sure that's not going to be the case in 2030. Reducing speeds will only increase distracted driving. I find that I get less focused on the road when I'm driving at a slower speed.

Perhaps you should not be driving then. The human brain can react to things much better at a lower speed...you would be able to catch a slow moving piece of paper much easier than a baseball, right?

nexus73

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2018, 11:29:10 PM »

Vision Zero is nothing but pie-in-the-sky idealism. It won't happen until 100% of cars on the roads are self-driving and I'm pretty sure that's not going to be the case in 2030. Reducing speeds will only increase distracted driving. I find that I get less focused on the road when I'm driving at a slower speed.

Perhaps you should not be driving then. The human brain can react to things much better at a lower speed...you would be able to catch a slow moving piece of paper much easier than a baseball, right?

Not always true.  The battleship Bismarck was attacked by torpedo carrying biplanes.  One got a lucky hit to jam the Bismarck's rudder and that led to its destruction.  Why did such slow planes even survive long enough to get a chance to launch their torpedoes?  Because the AA targeting system of the Bismarck was not set up to handle very low speed planes!  Did the human brain make up for the difference in guns aimed by them?  Nope. 

Rick
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Re: Oregon
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2018, 02:12:36 PM »

Posting the full article from here to avoid the Google Survey paywall:

ODOT to start Highway 34 safety projects
ALEX PAUL • Albany Democrat-Herald • Jan 22, 2018

Public reception to the installation of traffic signals and street lights at Seven Mile Lane and Highway 34 in 2016 has been overwhelming, according to Linn County Roadmaster Darrin Lane.

Now the Oregon Department of Transportation is preparing to start the second round of projects designed to improve traffic safety along Highway 34 between Lebanon and Corvallis.

The Seven Mile Lane project was a cooperative effort between Linn County and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

“As far as the signal goes, I have had 99.9 percent positive feedback,” Lane said. “I feel like it has been very successful in accomplishing the goals of improving safety and allowing crossing traffic to get through safely.”

The lights became active on Dec. 21, 2016.

By the end of the month, ODOT plans to begin the $3 million second phase of projects that will include:
  • Installing three miles of concrete median on Oregon 34 between Tangent Loop Road and Hinck Road.
  • Restricting Columbus Street turns to right-in and right-out only.
  • New lighting, striping and signs on Goltra Road.
  • New signs and striping for Colorado Lake Drive.
  • Upgraded lighting for Denny School Road.
Lane said the Goltra Road project will go a long way toward improving safety issues for the corridor. He said the more illumination, the better on long stretches of roadway.

“In the end, these projects won’t prevent every kind of accident from happening,” Lane said. “There will still be people who do dumb things such as driving under the influence or speeding. The move to right-only turns at Columbus should make a big difference in the number of crashes there. That should be a big help in terms of safety.”

ODOT plans to install a concrete center median on Highway 34 at the Columbus intersection.

“Plans to make this change have been in place for several years because that intersection has been recognized as a high crash corridor since at least 2008 due to the number of crashes, how often they have occurred, and how severe they have been,” ODOT spokeswoman Angela Beers Seydel noted in a prepared statement. “Between Jan. 1, 2011 and Dec. 31, 2016, there were 23 crashes involving injuries or fatalities. Of those 23 crashes, 14 were left-turn crashes. Nine of the 14 were from Columbus Street turning on to OR 34 eastbound.”

ODOT says drivers from south Albany and Linn-Benton Community College looking to access the freeway via a left-hand turn from Columbus Street can go to Seven Mile Lane and use the signal. To reduce the chance of severe rear-end crashes in the westbound direction of Highway 34, concrete median islands and separators were installed to calm traffic. A radar detector also was installed at the signal to increase green times if a vehicle couldn't stop in time.

New lighting, signs, and striping at Goltra Road and Colorado Lake Drive, as well as upgraded lighting at Denny School Road, will improve awareness and safety. Median rumble strips also were installed last year to help reduce crossover crashes.

Drivers can expect to see crews in various locations day and night in the project area.

ODOT asks the public to use caution and drive carefully. Lane closures will not be allowed during peak travel hours to minimize traffic impacts. But lanes may be closed Monday through Thursday between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m.

Additionally, work closing a lane at Goltra Road may be done between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Work without lane closures may be done during the day in other parts of the project area.

For more information on the project, including a background video: http://www.oregon.gov/odot/projects/pages/project-details.aspx?project=19662.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 02:51:16 AM by JasonOfORoads »
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nexus73

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2018, 07:34:18 PM »

Around 15 years or so ago, ODOT had a plan to improve the last few miles of the eastern section of 34 in Lebanon.  Having not been on that section in many years nor having heard anything about improvements, do you have any word on such a project Jason?

Rick
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Re: Oregon
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2018, 10:00:03 PM »

Around 15 years or so ago, ODOT had a plan to improve the last few miles of the eastern section of 34 in Lebanon.  Having not been on that section in many years nor having heard anything about improvements, do you have any word on such a project Jason?

Rick
Doing a search of ODOT's projects with the filter being "must involve Lebanon, only the project Jason mentioned came up unfortunately. None was also mentioned in the transportation package'd projects.

Quote from: ODOT
The area is posted at 50, but many people drive way faster than that
Really? Then raise it if people go way faster than that especially if this stretch of road is safer. I don't know, how does 60 sound?
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Re: Oregon
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2018, 02:50:50 AM »

Around 15 years or so ago, ODOT had a plan to improve the last few miles of the eastern section of 34 in Lebanon.  Having not been on that section in many years nor having heard anything about improvements, do you have any word on such a project Jason?

Rick
Doing a search of ODOT's projects with the filter being "must involve Lebanon, only the project Jason mentioned came up unfortunately. None was also mentioned in the transportation package'd projects.

I'm gonna try looking on the Wayback Machine to see if such a project was ever listed on ODOT's Region 2 projects page. I'll report back if I find anything of interest.

Quote from: ODOT
The area is posted at 50, but many people drive way faster than that
Really? Then raise it if people go way faster than that especially if this stretch of road is safer. I don't know, how does 60 sound?

I can see 55 being an option for the part east of I-5. I'm not sure if there's any grade separation west of I-5 apart from the 99E interchange. If so, I could see 60, but 55 otherwise. (I-5 between Albany and Eugene, however, should be at least 70.)
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Re: Oregon
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2018, 12:08:38 PM »



I can see 55 being an option for the part east of I-5. I'm not sure if there's any grade separation west of I-5 apart from the 99E interchange. If so, I could see 60, but 55 otherwise. (I-5 between Albany and Eugene, however, should be at least 70.)

I see it as 60 mainly because of the fact that I've driven this at 70 to keep up with the flow of traffic. Actually, the 60 section was referring to the mile west of I-5. The rest of the roadway can probably be posted at 65 with current data (predicting, I don't know the exact 85th%) and 70 without too much of a hitch.
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Re: Oregon
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2018, 02:35:24 AM »

Around 15 years or so ago, ODOT had a plan to improve the last few miles of the eastern section of 34 in Lebanon.  Having not been on that section in many years nor having heard anything about improvements, do you have any word on such a project Jason?

Rick
Doing a search of ODOT's projects with the filter being "must involve Lebanon, only the project Jason mentioned came up unfortunately. None was also mentioned in the transportation package'd projects.

After digging around the Wayback Machine from ~2002 to ~2016, I found a couple things of interest:

  • The Roche-Wolcott Segment just east of Corvallis consisted of a realignment of Wolcott Street to meet Peoria Road at a 4-way intersection. This intersection was considered one of the most dangerous and deadliest in the state because of how the two roads intersected with OR-34 and not each other. The Access Management and Expressway Plan (archived here) and the Project Information Paper (archived here) can explain the project in greater detail, but it looks like the southern frontage road didn't get built. Google Earth confirms it was realigned in 2011 and opened to traffic by the summer of 2012.
  • The most interesting was the US-20/OR-34 South Bypass to Peoria Road segment project, what I believe is contract #12580. While this project covers the same stretch of road as the Roche-Wolcott segment, this is a very different project. It actually consisted of constructing an interchange at the current junction of the South Bypass and OR-34/Van Buren Street, plus what looks like a realignment of OR-99W and possibly US-20 onto a new freeway section that would bypass Corvallis to the northeast, crossing the Willamette on a new bridge to meet the current eastern terminus of the South Bypass. In addition to the partial interchange at OR-34 and the bypass, there would've been a partial interchange southbound with what would be the former OR-99W through downtown Corvallis (3rd/4th Streets) and another one northbound at US-20/2nd Street eastbound to Albany. I found the old project page, which includes a project library and two different interchange maps (archived here and here). Apparently it was supposed to cost $42 million. Because of how large this project's scope was, a stop-gap measure was implemented around 2015 where 3rd Street was repaved, a dedicated right turn lane from 3rd to Van Buren was built, and dual right turn lanes were added at the corner of the South Bypass and OR-34. That project's page says this is to be considered part of a larger project to reduce congestion. However, the project doesn't appear to be on ODOT Region 2's projects page anymore, so who knows when other phases will be built.

I didn't really see anything about OR-34 to the east of I-5. Most of them were either the above two projects, something in the Coast Range and something in/near Waldport on the coast.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2018, 03:04:24 AM by JasonOfORoads »
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nexus73

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Re: Oregon
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2018, 01:33:41 PM »

Thanks for the research Jason.  ODOT bureaucrats have often drawn up plans and then let them fade away.  Back in 1990 the plan for 101 was to improve various segments to a 4-lane standard including what was then the busiest stretch of 2-lane highway in Oregon between North Bend and Reedsport.  It never happened.  What we got instead was a short lived segue into a parkway concept with one mile of demonstration road built in Lincoln County.  ODOT tried selling the concept to communities on the coast.  No one else wanted this.

Today the McCullough Bridge maintenance project continues.  It has been going on since 2009 and the current completion date is 2019.  Had ODOT built a modern 4-lane bridge it would not have cost that much more and been done quicker.  You can see how the planning for a 4-lane main bridge was used to make the bridge just north of it (Haynes Inlet) a 4-lane width with it currently marked for three plus an extra wide shoulder on the east side.

What would such a bridge have looked like?  If you go to Waldport and cross Alsea Bay on the one truly modern 101 bridge in Oregon, you'll be on a 4-lane affair with some beautiful arches that pay tribute to Conde McCullough.  Oh what could have been if ODOT was on the ball like they used to be in the glory days.

Rick
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US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

 


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