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MASTERNC:
I see 15/29 being the best bet, at least in winter.  If conditions are worse in the mountains, getting over to I-81 might not be the easiest thing.  In this case, at least you could have taken 29 to I-66 and cut back over to DC.

For Philly/NY, heading up 15 to Frederick and heading east on I-70 to Baltimore would at least get you back to 95 (or you could head up 83 to the Turnpike).

ahj2000:

--- Quote from: Dirt Roads on January 06, 2022, 01:40:13 PM ---Pulled over from the US-301 Nice Memorial Bridge thread:


--- Quote from: chrisdiaz on January 05, 2022, 01:49:41 AM ---Throughout the day today I had been continually checking google maps traffic conditions at the bridge. At one point, there was a 5 mile long dark red traffic jam on the Virginia side heading north, presumably in an attempt to avoid the mess that was I-95. I'm glad that the new bridge is adding lanes because there needs to be more redundancy in Potomac River crossings outside the DC metro.

--- End quote ---


--- Quote from: RoadPelican on January 06, 2022, 08:59:39 AM ---I remember about 15 years ago I was traveling north on I-95 on a Sunday afternoon in the Summer (big mistake!).  I got into congestion somewhere between Richmond and Fredericksburg on I-95 so I took VA Route 3 to US 301 and thought I had effectively bypassed the congestion but then I got into backup on US 301 right before the Potomac River (4 lanes merge into 2).  It was pretty long at least 2 miles, but 5 is pretty bad in the winter.  It shows you how much Northern VA and Southern MD has grown in 15 years.  A US 301 freeway upgrade would be GREAT!  But at least they are addressing that merge bottleneck.

--- End quote ---

As mentioned by others upthread, both US-1 and US-301/VA-2 are neither suitable alternatives when I-95 is shut down (for obvious reasons).  I've always taken US-522 as an outlet valve, eventually working my way over to US-15/US-29 and beyond, if necessary.  I would rather spend 6 hours cruising around the beautiful Virginia countryside that 8 hours or more stuck between Richmond and Northern Virginia.  If one is going all the way to New York, simply focus on how to get to Harrisburg the fastest way.  If going to Baltimore (or even Suburban Maryland), try to focus on getting to Frederick the fastest way (even if it means heading west of the Blue Ridge through eastern West Virginia).  Philly and New Jersey are a mixed bag, but a couple of in between options I've used more than once are US-30 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. 

It was easier to develop these habits during the NMSL-55 days, but the rules seem to work even better with the alternative routes having higher speeds (as compared to near zero along the I-95 corridor).

--- End quote ---
All this shows—there’s a lot of redundancy in the Interstate system further northeast…but nothing to bypass the DC Metro. The Beltway is terrible, 301 freeway for the win! If it connected all the way up to Delaware using DE 1 to return to 95, that’d be fantastic. If it only went to Bowie, took MD-3 to I-97, that’d still take off a ton of people. (Ideally, with my option B here, the whole 301/MD-3 thing would be I-97’s extension, and the little tail of 97 left over would be like an I-197. But I digress, as this is not Fictional.)

mrsman:

--- Quote from: ahj2000 on January 07, 2022, 06:38:11 PM ---
--- Quote from: Dirt Roads on January 06, 2022, 01:40:13 PM ---Pulled over from the US-301 Nice Memorial Bridge thread:


--- Quote from: chrisdiaz on January 05, 2022, 01:49:41 AM ---Throughout the day today I had been continually checking google maps traffic conditions at the bridge. At one point, there was a 5 mile long dark red traffic jam on the Virginia side heading north, presumably in an attempt to avoid the mess that was I-95. I'm glad that the new bridge is adding lanes because there needs to be more redundancy in Potomac River crossings outside the DC metro.

--- End quote ---


--- Quote from: RoadPelican on January 06, 2022, 08:59:39 AM ---I remember about 15 years ago I was traveling north on I-95 on a Sunday afternoon in the Summer (big mistake!).  I got into congestion somewhere between Richmond and Fredericksburg on I-95 so I took VA Route 3 to US 301 and thought I had effectively bypassed the congestion but then I got into backup on US 301 right before the Potomac River (4 lanes merge into 2).  It was pretty long at least 2 miles, but 5 is pretty bad in the winter.  It shows you how much Northern VA and Southern MD has grown in 15 years.  A US 301 freeway upgrade would be GREAT!  But at least they are addressing that merge bottleneck.

--- End quote ---

As mentioned by others upthread, both US-1 and US-301/VA-2 are neither suitable alternatives when I-95 is shut down (for obvious reasons).  I've always taken US-522 as an outlet valve, eventually working my way over to US-15/US-29 and beyond, if necessary.  I would rather spend 6 hours cruising around the beautiful Virginia countryside that 8 hours or more stuck between Richmond and Northern Virginia.  If one is going all the way to New York, simply focus on how to get to Harrisburg the fastest way.  If going to Baltimore (or even Suburban Maryland), try to focus on getting to Frederick the fastest way (even if it means heading west of the Blue Ridge through eastern West Virginia).  Philly and New Jersey are a mixed bag, but a couple of in between options I've used more than once are US-30 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. 

It was easier to develop these habits during the NMSL-55 days, but the rules seem to work even better with the alternative routes having higher speeds (as compared to near zero along the I-95 corridor).

--- End quote ---
All this shows—there’s a lot of redundancy in the Interstate system further northeast…but nothing to bypass the DC Metro. The Beltway is terrible, 301 freeway for the win! If it connected all the way up to Delaware using DE 1 to return to 95, that’d be fantastic. If it only went to Bowie, took MD-3 to I-97, that’d still take off a ton of people. (Ideally, with my option B here, the whole 301/MD-3 thing would be I-97’s extension, and the little tail of 97 left over would be like an I-197. But I digress, as this is not Fictional.)

--- End quote ---

We need both the eastern and western bypasses of the DC area.  The eastern bypass, while not entirely freeway, is at least marked as  a continuous route US 301.  Yes, as you've said, a freeway routing of US 301 and MD-3 will at least provide a DC bypass to bring traffic from Richmond and further south to Baltimore.  It will lead to the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel, which is really underutilized as most northeast corridor traffic is using the Ft McHenry Tunnnel, and will get you to I-95 north of Baltimore, which tends to handle traffic nicely except at commuting hours.

Eastern shore freeway along the northern stretch of US 301, while nice, would not be as necessary for these purposes.  It still won't be able to avoid the mess at the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

LM117:
Governor-elect Youngkin has picked Sheppard Miller III to be the next Secretary of Transportation.

https://www.wavy.com/news/politics/virginia-politics/youngkin-taps-retired-norfolk-businessman-for-transportation-secretary/

VTGoose:
Gov. Northam in one of his final acts puts in motion plans to complete U.S. 460 to Kentucky. It won't be completed until 2026 though.

"Governor Ralph Northam today announced a comprehensive agreement to construct the $207 million Route 460/121 Poplar Creek “Phase B” project in Buchanan County.

"The project — known as Corridor Q — is part of the National Highway System. Poplar Creek Phase B is just under two miles in length and will be a two-lane roadway with climbing lanes as needed, stretching from the east end of U.S. 460/121 Poplar Creek Phase A near U.S. 604 (Poplar Creek Road) to existing U.S. 460 at Grundy.

"While the majority of funds used for the Corridor Q projects in Buchanan County to date have been state matched federal funds, the advancement of the construction of Poplar Creek Phase B at this time was made possible by flexibility provided by the 2020 Transportation Omnibus Legislation, the governor’s office said.

"A distinctive feature of the Corridor Q projects in Buchanan County is the use of the coal synergy process. VDOT and its public-private partner Bizzack Construction LLC, incorporated the coal synergy process into the majority of the projects, reducing road-building costs by using larger earth-moving machinery traditionally used by coal companies to prepare the road bed to rough grade, and allowing the company to recover merchantable coal reserves during the road bed preparation."

https://cardinalnews.org/2022/01/14/northam-announces-final-phase-of-460-construction-in-buchanan-county/

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