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Bad cable TV systems

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bandit957:

--- Quote from: RobbieL2415 on September 29, 2023, 01:58:41 PM ---I remember some channels on our old Cox analog system (the Manchester, CT, franchise) being really poorly modulated, with a noisy/static-filled picture.

--- End quote ---

Storer Cable had the video bleeding into the audio for a while, so the sound on some channels was nothing but a loud rumble.

kphoger:

--- Quote from: RobbieL2415 on September 29, 2023, 01:58:41 PM ---I remember some channels on our old Cox analog system (the Manchester, CT, franchise) being really poorly modulated, with a noisy/static-filled picture.

--- End quote ---

In multiple houses?  I'd have thought that would be due to a specific frequency being affected by location-specific wiring deficiency.

SectorZ:
In the early 1990's, the TV in my living room hooked up to Lowell Cable had a buzzing noise out of it when watching cable-only channels and when it transitioned from national ads to local ads. Happened in no other TV in the house, and later on a new TV in the same outlet didn't do it.

Poor Lowell Cable tried everything to stop it, and got Magnavox involved, who replaced the guts of the TV (still made the sound) then replaced the TV entirely (and still made the sound). At some point everyone gave up and we dealt with it, and after a few years just got a new TV and that problem was over.

Was always curious if the transition to digital cable (in 1997 for us) would have ended it, but we replaced the TV in 1995.

Henry:
Back in the day, the only cable channel I would watch religiously was WGN, back when they had the Cubs' TV rights. The other channels I could care less about, but now, I've had some bad experiences with cable lately, such as skyrocketing rates. With more OTA choices available (such as MeTV, Buzzr and Ion), I'm seriously considering cutting the cord simply because it's not fun anymore.

ZLoth:
One of the issues with multi-channel providers (so that I can include others forms such as Direct Broadcast Satellite (DirecTV and Dish Networks) ) goes back to the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act of 1992 which resulted in the TV stations either specifying "must carry" status or obtain retransmission consent where the station can require a per-subscriber fee to carry the station on a multi-channel provider. This has resulting in multiple carriage disputes where a major media provider owns both the TV stations across multiple markets as well as multiple cable channels. As an example, Disney owns the following stations:

* WLS-TV - Chicago, IL
* WTVD - Durham–Raleigh–Fayetteville, NC
* KFSN-TV - Fresno, CA
* KTRK-TV - Houston, TX
* KABC-TV - Los Angeles, CA
* WABC-TV - New York City, NY
* WPVI-TV - Philadelphia, PA
* KGO-TV - San Francisco–Oakland–San Jose, CAThey also own ESPN and the Disney Channel. So, the carriage agreement between Disney and the multi-channel provider covers not only the TV station, but also E$PN, Disney Channel, and other, lesser watched Disney-owned properties. Funny how the TV contracts expire right around major events such as the New Years Bowl Games or the Oscars. Those carriage contracts include which programming tier the channel is carried at, which, for E$PN, is at all programming tiers except the most lowest and limited tiers.

The other pet peeve is, of course, the $ports Channels. Outside of the premium channels, E$PN and the Regional $port$ Network$ are the most expensive channels on a per-subscriber basis. During Covid where sports were shut down, the channel providers still have to pay the monthly fees. During the last few years, some of the multi-channel providers have dropped carriage of the sports channels citing the costs and low viewership, with Dish dropping the channels entirely. And, it is well known that one of the RSNs, Bally Sports, is in bankruptcy while AT&T Sportsnet will be shutting their RSN services down if new owners aren't found.

There are many consumers who would love the ala carte version where they can only select the channels they want. The media providers just won't let them.

Quite frankly, I stronly believe that the era of watching a program at an appointed time is over unless it's sports programming. I have felt that over the past twenty years, the cost-benefit ratio of the linear programming provder has gone downhill. I will admit that some of this is related to changes in my personal life.

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