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Author Topic: Traffic signal  (Read 868573 times)

Big John

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4825 on: November 05, 2022, 08:28:51 AM »


Yeah with LEFT above the signal head.  Come to think of it, does Michigan use back plates?
They are not common, but can be found in Michigan.
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4826 on: November 07, 2022, 08:54:21 AM »


Yeah with LEFT above the signal head.  Come to think of it, does Michigan use back plates?
They are not common, but can be found in Michigan.

They are becoming more common. New Michigan signal installs, whether span wire or mast arm, generally use backplates.

Slightly related, I have to say, I miss the classic Michigan signals with diagonal span wires. Now they just do a similar thing to the other Midwestern states.
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4827 on: November 14, 2022, 12:14:20 AM »

I'm hoping to get some more photos and videos up, but I wanted to write a bit about Japanese traffic signal operations.

First, I want to talk about the design. Japan primarily uses horizontal signals outside of two situations: (1) snowy areas, or (2) signals placed in tight spots for additional visibility. Otherwise, signals are always horizontal. Because Japan drives on the left, the horizontal signals are opposite from what you'd see in the right-hand traffic countries. So, red is on the far right, closest to the inside of the road, with green on the outside. Arrows are also used, and are placed below the main lenses at horizontal signals, and to the right at vertical signals. The arrows are always green, no yellow arrows to be found here. Most four way intersections will have a right-facing green arrow, some with left turn lanes also have a left turn filter signal. T intersections never have green arrows, the protected phase has oncoming traffic stop on red, but there is no indication of this to turning traffic; Japanese law does not seem to allow a green arrow and green orb to be lit simultaneously. The signals themselves are either grey or dark brown. There have been three design "ages": incandescent signals, then LED signals with visors, and (presently) LED signals without a visor. The non-visor signals are single units, rather than individual signal faces.

Next, I want to talk about operations. Japan is...not the most creative when it comes to signal phasing. The standard phasing is very simple: through traffic and pedestrians have green simultaneous, turning traffic yields; this is followed by a green arrow for right turning traffic. The right turn green arrows always come on at the same time, for both directions, no matter what. Most four-way intersections with turn lanes will have this operation, though some do not have any protected phase (example here with a double right turn). Three-way intersections, for traffic turning right off the top of the T, also typically get a protected phase, but as mentioned above, there is no green arrow; traffic has to deduce that it's their turn based on oncoming traffic having stopped. Regardless of the number of turn lanes, these operations described above are the same (double left turns, double right turns, everything is always a yield). Advanced left turns are exceedingly rare. I have only seen one, and it is shown with a green right, up, and left arrows and a red orb (example on my Flickr). Green phases of any kind always end with the yellow orb, even green arrows (so the main three-section signal will go from red to yellow if a green arrow phase is ending, kind of confusing if you only look for a split second).

Importantly: all traffic signals are timed. There are no actuated signals in Japan, that I've seen at least. I think they have time of day phasing, but that may be it. Pedestrian walk signals always activate with through traffic. Left on red is prohibited except on military installations.

I don't know if anyone here cares about Japan, or were curious. Hopefully this sums things up pretty well. Eventually I'll get some videos, since I know some of what I'm describing is pretty unusual.

Hobart

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4828 on: November 14, 2022, 07:10:29 PM »

I'm hoping to get some more photos and videos up, but I wanted to write a bit about Japanese traffic signal operations.

First, I want to talk about the design. Japan primarily uses horizontal signals outside of two situations: (1) snowy areas, or (2) signals placed in tight spots for additional visibility. Otherwise, signals are always horizontal. Because Japan drives on the left, the horizontal signals are opposite from what you'd see in the right-hand traffic countries. So, red is on the far right, closest to the inside of the road, with green on the outside. Arrows are also used, and are placed below the main lenses at horizontal signals, and to the right at vertical signals. The arrows are always green, no yellow arrows to be found here. Most four way intersections will have a right-facing green arrow, some with left turn lanes also have a left turn filter signal. T intersections never have green arrows, the protected phase has oncoming traffic stop on red, but there is no indication of this to turning traffic; Japanese law does not seem to allow a green arrow and green orb to be lit simultaneously. The signals themselves are either grey or dark brown. There have been three design "ages": incandescent signals, then LED signals with visors, and (presently) LED signals without a visor. The non-visor signals are single units, rather than individual signal faces.

Next, I want to talk about operations. Japan is...not the most creative when it comes to signal phasing. The standard phasing is very simple: through traffic and pedestrians have green simultaneous, turning traffic yields; this is followed by a green arrow for right turning traffic. The right turn green arrows always come on at the same time, for both directions, no matter what. Most four-way intersections with turn lanes will have this operation, though some do not have any protected phase (example here with a double right turn). Three-way intersections, for traffic turning right off the top of the T, also typically get a protected phase, but as mentioned above, there is no green arrow; traffic has to deduce that it's their turn based on oncoming traffic having stopped. Regardless of the number of turn lanes, these operations described above are the same (double left turns, double right turns, everything is always a yield). Advanced left turns are exceedingly rare. I have only seen one, and it is shown with a green right, up, and left arrows and a red orb (example on my Flickr). Green phases of any kind always end with the yellow orb, even green arrows (so the main three-section signal will go from red to yellow if a green arrow phase is ending, kind of confusing if you only look for a split second).

Importantly: all traffic signals are timed. There are no actuated signals in Japan, that I've seen at least. I think they have time of day phasing, but that may be it. Pedestrian walk signals always activate with through traffic. Left on red is prohibited except on military installations.

I don't know if anyone here cares about Japan, or were curious. Hopefully this sums things up pretty well. Eventually I'll get some videos, since I know some of what I'm describing is pretty unusual.

How much of an adjustment was it from driving in the United States for you? Japan's on my bucket list, but it seems very different compared to much of what I've seen.
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4829 on: November 15, 2022, 12:07:12 AM »

A...very strange pedestrian (?) signal in Denver:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7382907,-104.9254345,3a,75y,97.41h,89.72t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sBhLm7DMrgtRp7QYNwzUJdA!2e0!5s20211101T000000!7i16384!8i8192

No crosswalk lights at all, no pedestrian waiting area, only cross street is a beat-up alleyway. Go back to earlier street view and it gets even weirder...not even a crosswalk:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.738287,-104.9254023,3a,75y,81.45h,87.23t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sqGJQnASnRidFCgGqxOfWWA!2e0!5s20110901T000000!7i13312!8i6656
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jakeroot

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4830 on: November 15, 2022, 12:39:50 AM »

How much of an adjustment was it from driving in the United States for you? Japan's on my bucket list, but it seems very different compared to much of what I've seen.

The Japanese are very forgiving drivers. Almost too forgiving. But it makes it easy to drive here. They don't go too fast, they don't take too many chances, etc. But otherwise, they're pretty liberal with intersection operations (no waiting for a green arrow), so things feel pretty high capacity for the most part. Driving on the left isn't too unusual, for me it was sitting on the right side of the car that took some getting used to.

Overall, I like driving here more than back in the United States or Canada.

jakeroot

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4831 on: November 15, 2022, 12:41:09 AM »

A...very strange pedestrian (?) signal in Denver:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7382907,-104.9254345,3a,75y,97.41h,89.72t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sBhLm7DMrgtRp7QYNwzUJdA!2e0!5s20211101T000000!7i16384!8i8192

No crosswalk lights at all, no pedestrian waiting area, only cross street is a beat-up alleyway. Go back to earlier street view and it gets even weirder...not even a crosswalk:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.738287,-104.9254023,3a,75y,81.45h,87.23t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sqGJQnASnRidFCgGqxOfWWA!2e0!5s20110901T000000!7i13312!8i6656

That is very strange indeed. It would appear to be timed?

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4832 on: November 15, 2022, 06:33:33 AM »

A...very strange pedestrian (?) signal in Denver:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7382907,-104.9254345,3a,75y,97.41h,89.72t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sBhLm7DMrgtRp7QYNwzUJdA!2e0!5s20211101T000000!7i16384!8i8192

No crosswalk lights at all, no pedestrian waiting area, only cross street is a beat-up alleyway. Go back to earlier street view and it gets even weirder...not even a crosswalk:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.738287,-104.9254023,3a,75y,81.45h,87.23t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sqGJQnASnRidFCgGqxOfWWA!2e0!5s20110901T000000!7i13312!8i6656

Very odd. My only guess is that it is there to create gaps in traffic to create opportunities for drivers crossing/entering at the intersections further downstream, without needing to fully signalise those intersections. Two blocks down, you can see detector loops in the pavement on one of the side roads:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7381104,-104.9234199,3a,39.4y,358.86h,82.3t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sDDhFopHx_eurPiTiUxdzOg!2e0!5s20211101T000000!7i16384!8i8192

So my guess is that if a vehicle is detected waiting for too long at one of these side streets, the signals turn red to create a gap in the traffic.

There is a similar arrangement on the other road in this one-way couplet, with what seem to be detector loops at the downstream intersection:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7367774,-104.9198352,3a,75y,264.59h,89.06t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sg70jYjxnB6uvYdbi4a8QoA!2e0!5s20211101T000000!7i16384!8i8192
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7369429,-104.9216755,3a,48.9y,201.53h,74.06t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1ssyKAzXvAgwWGDYTGTAA0Fw!2e0!5s20211001T000000!7i16384!8i8192

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riiga

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4833 on: November 15, 2022, 11:55:01 AM »

How much of an adjustment was it from driving in the United States for you? Japan's on my bucket list, but it seems very different compared to much of what I've seen.

The Japanese are very forgiving drivers. Almost too forgiving. But it makes it easy to drive here. They don't go too fast, they don't take too many chances, etc. But otherwise, they're pretty liberal with intersection operations (no waiting for a green arrow), so things feel pretty high capacity for the most part. Driving on the left isn't too unusual, for me it was sitting on the right side of the car that took some getting used to.

Overall, I like driving here more than back in the United States or Canada.

What about the signage? Apart from directional signs, it's Vienna Convention-style with the occasional deviation.
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jakeroot

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4834 on: November 15, 2022, 06:46:10 PM »

How much of an adjustment was it from driving in the United States for you? Japan's on my bucket list, but it seems very different compared to much of what I've seen.

The Japanese are very forgiving drivers. Almost too forgiving. But it makes it easy to drive here. They don't go too fast, they don't take too many chances, etc. But otherwise, they're pretty liberal with intersection operations (no waiting for a green arrow), so things feel pretty high capacity for the most part. Driving on the left isn't too unusual, for me it was sitting on the right side of the car that took some getting used to.

Overall, I like driving here more than back in the United States or Canada.

What about the signage? Apart from directional signs, it's Vienna Convention-style with the occasional deviation.

The signage is quite interesting. It is largely Vienna for regulatory signage. For example: red on blue diagonal line for no parking, white on blue left arrow for left-only turning, pedestrian-only zones show two people walking on a blue background, sometimes with a time regulation below it.

Warning signs are American style, although they include rounded corners that I don't see in the US. Overall, warning signs aren't that common though.

The stop sign is the weird one, using a red inverted triangle with "止まる" or "止まる / STOP" (with english) for newer signs. I heard that they were considering adopting the red octagon, but decided adding English to the existing design was sufficient. Largely I would agree. Yield signs don't say yield, rather reading "徐行" (literally "going slowly") or "徐行 / SLOW" on newer signs, but it's effectively the same thing as a yield. Sometimes you actually see a blue on white rectangle, which actually permits left on red, though I've never seen these used outside of slip lanes where drivers would yield anyway, even so far as yielding to traffic turning right despite not having that "slow" sign.

I don't see street name signs anywhere. The closest you see is at intersections, some of which have names. Eg, "Rycom", "Hiyagon", "Awase". But then Japanese addresses don't seem to include street names...at least not as westerners might recognize them.

Most intersections do have junction signs approaching them. They are usually simple white-on-blue legends with lines corresponding to upcoming intersection layout. It will show the cross-route and route number if applicable, and the destinations for all directions. Example in Rycom area showing route numbers, which are overlaid on the arrows, and expressway signage which is white-on-green, regardless if there is a toll.

I won't speak too much to expressways; the Okinawa Expressway dates to the 80s, as does much of its signage. I think there are newer standards seen on the mainland. There is new expressway construction occurring in a couple spots that I need to check out, there may be some newer signage along those stretches.

BuildTheRussian

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4835 on: November 19, 2022, 11:24:22 PM »

I'm hoping to get some more photos and videos up, but I wanted to write a bit about Japanese traffic signal operations.

First, I want to talk about the design. Japan primarily uses horizontal signals outside of two situations: (1) snowy areas, or (2) signals placed in tight spots for additional visibility. Otherwise, signals are always horizontal. Because Japan drives on the left, the horizontal signals are opposite from what you'd see in the right-hand traffic countries. So, red is on the far right, closest to the inside of the road, with green on the outside. Arrows are also used, and are placed below the main lenses at horizontal signals, and to the right at vertical signals. The arrows are always green, no yellow arrows to be found here. Most four way intersections will have a right-facing green arrow, some with left turn lanes also have a left turn filter signal. T intersections never have green arrows, the protected phase has oncoming traffic stop on red, but there is no indication of this to turning traffic; Japanese law does not seem to allow a green arrow and green orb to be lit simultaneously. The signals themselves are either grey or dark brown. There have been three design "ages": incandescent signals, then LED signals with visors, and (presently) LED signals without a visor. The non-visor signals are single units, rather than individual signal faces.

Next, I want to talk about operations. Japan is...not the most creative when it comes to signal phasing. The standard phasing is very simple: through traffic and pedestrians have green simultaneous, turning traffic yields; this is followed by a green arrow for right turning traffic. The right turn green arrows always come on at the same time, for both directions, no matter what. Most four-way intersections with turn lanes will have this operation, though some do not have any protected phase (example here with a double right turn). Three-way intersections, for traffic turning right off the top of the T, also typically get a protected phase, but as mentioned above, there is no green arrow; traffic has to deduce that it's their turn based on oncoming traffic having stopped. Regardless of the number of turn lanes, these operations described above are the same (double left turns, double right turns, everything is always a yield). Advanced left turns are exceedingly rare. I have only seen one, and it is shown with a green right, up, and left arrows and a red orb (example on my Flickr). Green phases of any kind always end with the yellow orb, even green arrows (so the main three-section signal will go from red to yellow if a green arrow phase is ending, kind of confusing if you only look for a split second).

Importantly: all traffic signals are timed. There are no actuated signals in Japan, that I've seen at least. I think they have time of day phasing, but that may be it. Pedestrian walk signals always activate with through traffic. Left on red is prohibited except on military installations.

I don't know if anyone here cares about Japan, or were curious. Hopefully this sums things up pretty well. Eventually I'll get some videos, since I know some of what I'm describing is pretty unusual.
Since you wrote a detailed traffic light article about Japan, I guess I'll also write a detailed traffic light article about Russia, because why not?
Regarding the design, most signals are vertically-arranged, although the standards permit horizontally-arranged signals. And indeed a few signals in my city are horizontal. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@55.988959,92.9070634,3a,42.6y,274.77h,99.22t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sUXhf9tuzWwFtJ9CJVp9BUw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
Regarding the operation, there are a few differences in the sequence from how it is in America.
Most traffic lights display "red+yellow" for 1 to 2 seconds before green, although the standards also permit "red straight to green" if the intersection is not coordinated with other intersections. The latter sequence is common in and around Moscow, and in a few cities such as Perm and Yekaterinburg.
Most traffic lights also flash green for 3 seconds before changing to yellow, although the standards merely recommend this. The yellow light is always 3 seconds long. Many intersections omit the "all-red" clearance period, and instead change at the same time. On that note, I've never seen any accidents caused by that.
These "red+yellow" and "flashing green" aspects are actually only recent additions; in the Soviet Union the traffic lights used to cycle "red->yellow->green->yellow".
Traffic lights often have "additional sections" on the side of the main green light, which are generally used to control turning movements, but some T-intersections may have straight additional sections. https://www.google.com/maps/@56.0452431,92.7755264,3a,15y,343.09h,91.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sNVsoI4_chSf86JEey4w0Pw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
The main green light will have an arrow outline on top, indicating the directions in which it applies, while the additional sections are full arrows.
If the traffic light is green, and the additional section is off, you must wait for the additional section to come on to proceed in it's direction. Some intersections display a red ring when the additional section is off to emphasise this. Most protected left turns are signalled in this way.
If the traffic light is red, and the additional section is on, you must give way to other road users before proceeding in it's direction. This is often used to permit "right turn on red".
There's also an experimental "yield to everyone before turning right" sign permitting right turns on red, that some cities have installed at intersections with low pedestrian volumes, in order to save costs on additional sections. https://www.google.com/maps/@56.0629359,92.682687,3a,15y,66.29h,91.67t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szj4OOLwRWdT1PkBvXQTIeg!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
Some traffic lights may use arrows instead of circles, this means that they only apply in the direction the arrows point. Generally this will be where you can't proceed in any other direction, other than in the direction of the arrows.
Historically, the traffic lights have been fixed-time, with traffic cops manually controlling the lights at busy intersections, for which they had special huts. However, the latter is not practiced anymore.
Today, most traffic lights are still fixed-time, with some intersections having different plans for different times of day, and different days.
To reduce delays, at night many traffic lights flash yellow in all directions, meaning that road users must obey the priority signs posted alongside the traffic lights, or yield to the right if there aren't any. However, this practice is slowly falling out of favour, as research at the Moscow Road Traffic Organisation Centre had shown that keeping the lights on at night reduced accidents by up to 38%. My city got rid of flashing yellow at night as early as 2013.
Countdown timers have been introduced in some cities (mine included) about 15 years ago, initially being a separate signal section on top of the red light. With the advent of LED traffic lights, the countdown timer is now commonly incorporated into the yellow light section, with the colour of the numbers either being white, or according to the colour of the traffic light. Countdown timers are also often incorporated into pedestrian signals. If the number is too big to be displayed, two dashes "--" will instead flash until the number gets down to 99. The countdown timers may also display two dashes at the end of the countdown, if for some reason the phase is continued.
Although fixed-time is the predominant form of control, things are moving, and in 2017, the first actuated traffic light was installed in the city of Zelenograd, at the intersection of Panfilovsky and Generala Alekseyeva avenues. Since then, all traffic lights in Zelenograd have been upgraded to be actuated. An interesting detail is that due to the Russian climate, with the roads needing to be resurfaced every year, the inductive loops are buried much deeper (15-17 m) than in most of the world (5-8 m).
This technology is locally known as a "smart intersection", and belongs to a company called "SpetsDorProject". On that note, they have a YouTube channel where they show off these traffic lights, and their installation, if anyone is interested. They also have a website with a cool map of all the "smart intersections" in Russia. https://www.youtube.com/c/%D0%A1%D0%BF%D0%B5%D1%86%D0%94%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%9F%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B5%D0%BA%D1%82/videos
https://xn--e1aakgahhmflcmnd6jpe.xn--p1ai/
For obvious reasons, actuated traffic lights do not display countdowns. However, some intersections run fixed-time plans at certain times of day (to allow coordination I suppose), and are actuated at other times of day. During these times, it instead displays "АУ", which stands for "Адаптивное Управление/Actuated Control". This is most common in St Petersburg and Belgorod, where this is often used for transit priority.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2022, 01:59:56 AM by BuildTheRussian »
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JoePCool14

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4836 on: November 21, 2022, 12:50:07 PM »

Thanks for all the details on both the Russian and Japanese signals. My biggest dislike on the most modern signals in both those countries is the lack of visors. The LED signals look so skinny, they look like toys to me. I think visors would make them standout more.
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4837 on: November 21, 2022, 02:50:10 PM »

What color signal head is this supposed to be?
https://goo.gl/maps/P7D1EMCbJdkzwmfq7
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4838 on: November 21, 2022, 05:18:24 PM »

What color signal head is this supposed to be?
https://goo.gl/maps/P7D1EMCbJdkzwmfq7
Silver, like in DC?
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4839 on: November 21, 2022, 07:59:41 PM »

What color signal head is this supposed to be?
https://goo.gl/maps/P7D1EMCbJdkzwmfq7
Silver, like in DC?

The legacy MDC roads (then DCR) have had gray signal poles for quite some time.  Before that, they were a forest green.  The newest replacement ones on roads like Revere Beach Parkway (MA 16) are the standard MassDOT (DPW/MassHighway predecessor) yellow poles, so they seem to be going away from the gray. 
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BuildTheRussian

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4840 on: November 21, 2022, 11:48:34 PM »

Thanks for all the details on both the Russian and Japanese signals. My biggest dislike on the most modern signals in both those countries is the lack of visors. The LED signals look so skinny, they look like toys to me. I think visors would make them standout more.
I forgot to mention that. The lack of visors is especially bad on a sunny day. There is a mix of various kinds of traffic signal models in my city, with some of them being LED signals with visors, but the "skinny signals" remain predominant.
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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4841 on: November 22, 2022, 01:51:32 PM »

What color signal head is this supposed to be?
https://goo.gl/maps/P7D1EMCbJdkzwmfq7

I imagine it's supposed to be precisely the color it is.
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Amtrakprod

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4842 on: November 23, 2022, 06:32:56 PM »

What color signal head is this supposed to be?
https://goo.gl/maps/P7D1EMCbJdkzwmfq7

Official color is gun metal grey. Standard color of MassDCR in Massachusetts
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Roadgeek, railfan, and crossing signal fan. From Massachusetts, and in high school. Youtube is my website link. Loves FYAs signals. Interest in Bicycle Infrastructure. Owns one Leotech Pedestrian Signal, and a Safetran Type 1 E bell.

BuildTheRussian

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4843 on: November 30, 2022, 12:47:54 AM »

In Kaluga, Russia, there is a button-actuated traffic signal, but for cars..

The sign says: Attention! Press the button for the green light to turn on.
https://www.google.com/maps/@54.5209373,36.1963995,3a,16.2y,291.27h,87.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9NLdCVeuxvxkDHxIuepZXA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
« Last Edit: November 30, 2022, 01:13:06 AM by BuildTheRussian »
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JoePCool14

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4844 on: November 30, 2022, 11:04:44 AM »

In Kaluga, Russia, there is a button-actuated traffic signal, but for cars..

The sign says: Attention! Press the button for the green light to turn on.
https://www.google.com/maps/@54.5209373,36.1963995,3a,16.2y,291.27h,87.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9NLdCVeuxvxkDHxIuepZXA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Now that's interesting. I'm trying to find a scenario where something like this would genuinely be more beneficial than a typical in-pavement or camera actuator.
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Scott5114

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4845 on: November 30, 2022, 02:43:37 PM »

In Kaluga, Russia, there is a button-actuated traffic signal, but for cars..

The sign says: Attention! Press the button for the green light to turn on.
https://www.google.com/maps/@54.5209373,36.1963995,3a,16.2y,291.27h,87.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9NLdCVeuxvxkDHxIuepZXA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Now that's interesting. I'm trying to find a scenario where something like this would genuinely be more beneficial than a typical in-pavement or camera actuator.

Here's one: You own a button-actuated signal company.
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Dirt Roads

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4846 on: November 30, 2022, 09:39:08 PM »

In Kaluga, Russia, there is a button-actuated traffic signal, but for cars..

The sign says: Attention! Press the button for the green light to turn on.
https://www.google.com/maps/@54.5209373,36.1963995,3a,16.2y,291.27h,87.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9NLdCVeuxvxkDHxIuepZXA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Now that's interesting. I'm trying to find a scenario where something like this would genuinely be more beneficial than a typical in-pavement or camera actuator.

Here's one: You own a button-actuated signal company.

Or there is snow on the road and the camera more than half of the year.   :coffee:
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Jet380

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4847 on: December 01, 2022, 04:12:30 AM »

In Kaluga, Russia, there is a button-actuated traffic signal, but for cars..
The sign says: Attention! Press the button for the green light to turn on.
https://www.google.com/maps/@54.5209373,36.1963995,3a,16.2y,291.27h,87.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9NLdCVeuxvxkDHxIuepZXA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Now that's interesting. I'm trying to find a scenario where something like this would genuinely be more beneficial than a typical in-pavement or camera actuator.

It miiiight be useful if you had a shared turn/through lane with permissive/protected arrows, so you can skip the turn phase unless a driver presses the button to indicate that they want to turn. But still not likely to be worth the confusion it would cause.
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BuildTheRussian

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4848 on: December 01, 2022, 12:52:57 PM »

An unlatched calling detector with a delay of a few seconds would still be the best solution to such situations.
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roadman65

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Re: Traffic signal
« Reply #4849 on: December 05, 2022, 10:48:51 PM »

Old Caltrans mast arm.
https://goo.gl/maps/E89UXfEtUWrb9CgU9

Though Iím quite curious to the signal head on the mast arm.  Each are independently round and not square.
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