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Author Topic: Risk Aversion  (Read 4983 times)

jeffandnicole

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #225 on: June 20, 2022, 01:03:52 PM »

Frankly, I've never heard of any ex-President saying that they wanted to do X, but the Secret Service said "no."

I doubt this would really be put out into the public, especially for minor stuff.  "Hey, I should get out and walk in this parade".  "Mr. President, I would advise against that".

They didn't say No, but they didn't exactly open the doors for him either.

If a President indicated they wanted to make a stop, there are Secret Service teams that would quickly scout an area before the President arrived (and we're talking a matter of minutes), and before the President was allowed out of the vehicle the area would be comfortably secured.

More significant stuff would be a matter of policy if he was allowed to roam somewhere, like a mall or something.  But stuff like that normally wouldn't be impromptu trips.
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hbelkins

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #226 on: June 20, 2022, 03:10:11 PM »

Frankly, I've never heard of any ex-President saying that they wanted to do X, but the Secret Service said "no."

Not an ex-president, but I've definitely heard it from a sitting president.

Wasn't it Reagan who took everyone (including the SS) by surprise by getting out of the car and walking for part of the inaugural parade?
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NWI_Irish96

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #227 on: June 20, 2022, 03:15:32 PM »

https://civilservicehq.com/can-the-secret-service-override-the-president/

I can't say this site is 100% credible, but it appears to be. It indicates that the Secret Service does have authority over the President when it comes to the President's security.
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abefroman329

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #228 on: June 20, 2022, 03:48:27 PM »

Wasn't it Reagan who took everyone (including the SS) by surprise by getting out of the car and walking for part of the inaugural parade?
That was Obama.
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Scott5114

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #229 on: June 20, 2022, 07:19:43 PM »

Meanwhile, going to the other extreme, Ukrainian President Zelensky caused a major headache for his staff a few months back, while Kyiv was in very real danger of falling into Russian hands, by popping out of the office unexpectedly to go buy a particular borscht he'd been craving.

I can't say this site is 100% credible, but it appears to be. It indicates that the Secret Service does have authority over the President when it comes to the President's security.

I get the feeling that this is one of those "power in name only" sorts of thing. Yes, the Secret Service has the legal power to tell the President no, but the President has the power to fire the head of the Secret Service, so who really has the power there?
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hbelkins

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #230 on: June 20, 2022, 09:22:43 PM »

Wasn't it Reagan who took everyone (including the SS) by surprise by getting out of the car and walking for part of the inaugural parade?
That was Obama.

That recently? I thought it happened in the much more distant past.
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Big John

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #231 on: June 20, 2022, 09:56:28 PM »

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Big John

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #232 on: June 20, 2022, 10:04:50 PM »

Apparently, every recent President has walked part of the inauguration route: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/19/us/trump-inaugural-parade-walk.html
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Takumi

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #233 on: June 20, 2022, 10:29:10 PM »

^ The article was written before Biden became president, but he did it too.
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abefroman329

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #234 on: June 21, 2022, 10:29:56 AM »

second term:
He did that at his first inauguration as well, I remember watching it live.
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hbelkins

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #235 on: June 21, 2022, 11:25:12 AM »

The only inauguration I can ever remember watching live was Trump's, and that wasn't by choice. I was at a transportation conference that day and they put the speech up on the big screens at lunch.

I tend to tune out speeches by elected officials of both parties and all that overblown pomp and circumstance.

Kentucky state government gets closed down when the governor is inaugurated, mostly because Frankfort is a cluster foxtrot that day and you can't get to a lot of the offices. Out of fairness, they give everyone a holiday, even those who don't work in Frankfort.

Just once, I'd like to see a governor come in and say, "I don't want any of this stuff. No parade, no inaugural speech, no inaugural balls. Time to get to work."
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kkt

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #236 on: June 28, 2022, 10:29:01 PM »

$1 bills shouldn't exist anymore, anyway. Canada, the UK, the euro, Australia, and New Zealand all have 1 and 2 as coins, while their lowest banknote is 5. (Switzerland and Japan go farther and have 5 francs and 500 yen as coins and 10 francs and 1000 yen as the lowest banknote, but I don't think we need to do that.)

All the currencies I mentioned are somewhat similar to the US dollar (New Zealand at NZ$3=US$2 is the farthest away), with some above and some below, except Japan where yen are basically cents instead of dollars.

What makes them right and us wrong?
^This.  Isn't printing paper easier than minting coins?

Yes, but paper only lasts a couple of years in circulation, while coins last for decades.
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Scott5114

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #237 on: Today at 04:02:50 AM »

$1 bills shouldn't exist anymore, anyway. Canada, the UK, the euro, Australia, and New Zealand all have 1 and 2 as coins, while their lowest banknote is 5. (Switzerland and Japan go farther and have 5 francs and 500 yen as coins and 10 francs and 1000 yen as the lowest banknote, but I don't think we need to do that.)

All the currencies I mentioned are somewhat similar to the US dollar (New Zealand at NZ$3=US$2 is the farthest away), with some above and some below, except Japan where yen are basically cents instead of dollars.

What makes them right and us wrong?
^This.  Isn't printing paper easier than minting coins?

Yes, but paper only lasts a couple of years in circulation, while coins last for decades.


Many big non-Euro, non-USD currencies have gone to "paper" money that is actually printed on plastic, which of course lasts a lot longer than paper. Both Canada and Mexico have done so; Canada's is said to smell faintly of maple syrup.
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NWI_Irish96

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #238 on: Today at 06:54:35 AM »

Meanwhile, going to the other extreme, Ukrainian President Zelensky caused a major headache for his staff a few months back, while Kyiv was in very real danger of falling into Russian hands, by popping out of the office unexpectedly to go buy a particular borscht he'd been craving.

I can't say this site is 100% credible, but it appears to be. It indicates that the Secret Service does have authority over the President when it comes to the President's security.

I get the feeling that this is one of those "power in name only" sorts of thing. Yes, the Secret Service has the legal power to tell the President no, but the President has the power to fire the head of the Secret Service, so who really has the power there?

So I think we got our answer yesterday.
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Rothman

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Re: Risk Aversion
« Reply #239 on: Today at 06:59:12 AM »

$1 bills shouldn't exist anymore, anyway. Canada, the UK, the euro, Australia, and New Zealand all have 1 and 2 as coins, while their lowest banknote is 5. (Switzerland and Japan go farther and have 5 francs and 500 yen as coins and 10 francs and 1000 yen as the lowest banknote, but I don't think we need to do that.)

All the currencies I mentioned are somewhat similar to the US dollar (New Zealand at NZ$3=US$2 is the farthest away), with some above and some below, except Japan where yen are basically cents instead of dollars.

What makes them right and us wrong?
^This.  Isn't printing paper easier than minting coins?

Yes, but paper only lasts a couple of years in circulation, while coins last for decades.
Well...if you're going to reply to a very early post in this thread, you might as well have read the entire discussion on the matter that followed.

Sort of an Internet Explorer response:  Loaded the page after every other browser did...
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