Regional Boards > International Highways

Roads and highways in Israel

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J N Winkler:
My interpretation:  each part of the diaspora contributed.

It is possible the Israelis looked first to the British when designing their direction signing system, and some features--such as interchange name panels at the tops of advance guide signs and destinations on lane assignment signs--appear to have been borrowed directly from Britain.  However, the color coding itself can't be a relic of Mandate times since Israel became independent in 1948 and the British did not start using color-coded direction signs until 1958 (blue, for the motorways) and 1965 (green and white respectively for primary and non-primary routes).  Like the French but unlike the British (and, for that matter, the Germans), the Israelis use the color code of the interchanging roadway for the exit direction sign, not the color code of the road being exited.  The arrow designs and the use of yellow bottom panels for lane drops seem American-influenced.  As noted upthread, the positioning of route cartouches is very German.

ljwestmcsd:

--- Quote from: jczart on August 24, 2012, 08:21:26 PM ---I bet they're blue because of the British colonial times, and I'd guess that's why the license plates are Yellow and black, too (maybe?)

--- End quote ---

If they do things based on British colonialism, then why do they drive on the right?

austrini:
The middle east drives on the right because of the Ottoman Empire, but I'd figure modern signage and markings came after the decision on what side of the road to drive on - right in the British colonial period.

J N Winkler:

--- Quote from: jczart on August 24, 2012, 11:04:31 PM ---The middle east drives on the right because of the Ottoman Empire, but I'd figure modern signage and markings came after the decision on what side of the road to drive on - right in the British colonial period.
--- End quote ---

"After" is probably correct only if you mean "long after."  The signs used in Israel now look nothing like the signs used in Britain in the 1920's and 1930's, which would have been the logical model for Mandate Palestine:  as regards direction signs these would have been fingerposts and simple diagrammatics, all with black letters on white background.

Alps:
I'm about to head to Israel for a week. I'm aware to avoid tolls on Highway 6 and the Carmel tunnels, and I'm aware to stay in "Zone A" if I'm in the West Bank. So, besides that: Does anyone have any input on things to see from a road perspective, or anything I should look for as I ride?

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