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paulthemapguy:

--- Quote from: roadman65 on August 24, 2022, 09:08:44 AM ---Why are all highways in Michigan called Trunklines?

--- End quote ---

As stated on my website's glossary, "Trunk" is a word to describe highways used by people who like talking about trees.  :sombrero:

Terry Shea:

--- Quote from: roadman65 on August 24, 2022, 09:08:44 AM ---Why are all highways in Michigan called Trunklines?

--- End quote ---
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trunk%20line#:~:text=Definition%20of%20trunk%20line,b%20%3A%20trunk%20sense%205b

bulldog1979:

--- Quote from: roadman65 on August 24, 2022, 09:08:44 AM ---Why are all highways in Michigan called Trunklines?

--- End quote ---

When the system was created in 1913, the legislation called them "State Reward Trunk Line Highways". Over the years, "reward" was removed from the name (the state was no longer paying county road commissions to maintain the highways on its behalf) and the space was removed to result in "trunkline". As mentioned above, a "trunkline" implies a main corridor in a transportation system, and since traffic funnels onto the state highways to pass from place to place, that adjective is appropriate.

jzn110:

--- Quote from: afguy on August 02, 2022, 10:17:21 PM ---My only criticism of the US-23 project is that they are not replacing the railroad bridge in this area as well. By not replacing this bridge now, it will cost more in the long run when MDOT ever does decide US-23.
--- End quote ---

Railroad bridges are usually owned and maintained by whichever rail company owns the tracks crossing it. MDOT probably can't touch it without the involvement of the rail company.

afguy:
MDOT has unveiled three options for improving the ramps at M-14/Barton Drive. I personally prefer the 4th option which is the "dogbone" interchange design.
Potential changes to Ann Arbor M-14 interchange could include extended ramps, roundabouts


--- Quote ---Officials have now unveiled some concepts under consideration to reconfigure the interchange. They include four alternatives, with the first representing the status quo and no additional construction or changes, for comparison with the other options.The second would involve closing the eastbound M-14 ramps at Barton Drive, without changing the westbound ramps. Approximately 10,000 vehicles a day use the eastbound ramps, according to an MDOT video presentation.The third, “modified loop” design would move the eastbound ramps further north on MDOT property, allowing for free-flowing traffic to merge onto the highway without having to slow to a stop.

Designs show the reconfiguration would also include a nature trail connection crossing the ramps. A trail now runs from Whitmore Lake Road, through a tunnel under M-14 north of the current ramps and on to Pontiac Trail.The last, “dog bone” design is configured as a diamond interchange with single-lane roundabouts at the end of the ramps, connecting both sides of the highway to Whitmore Lake Road, where another traffic circle would be installed.


Sidewalks and trail connections are also included in the design, indicated in light blue.
--- End quote ---
https://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/2022/09/potential-changes-to-ann-arbor-m-14-interchange-could-include-extended-ramps-roundabouts.html

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