AARoads Forum

National Boards => Bridges => Topic started by: fillup420 on September 29, 2019, 08:05:41 AM

Title: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: fillup420 on September 29, 2019, 08:05:41 AM
North Carolina seems to have a thing for this. I drove up NC 49 the other day and noticed NCDOT had replaced a small creek bridge by building it next to the old one, and then slightly rerouting the roadway. to me it seems like an overkill way to replace a bridge. yall know of any more examples like this?
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: MikeTheActuary on September 29, 2019, 08:28:32 AM
Well, there's the Tappan Zee outside New York City, the Pont Samuel-de Champlain in Montréal....

It's a fairly common tactic, I think.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: wanderer2575 on September 29, 2019, 08:47:11 AM
I'd guess it's usually done to avoid the lengthy detours of a total road closure.

Or the bridge is retained for historical significance or recreational value.  When MDOT constructed the current US-12 bridge over the St. Joseph River in Mottville MI, it kept the previous narrow camelback bridge and the old highway alignment west of it was made into a small park.

Google Maps link:  https://goo.gl/maps/9Y4gJGFjRGPTwevM7
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Max Rockatansky on September 29, 2019, 09:09:28 AM
Pretty much every modern bridge on US 1 in the Florida Keys. 
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: jeffandnicole on September 29, 2019, 09:56:02 AM
Yep, this is done quite often.  When the roadway is slightly shifted to the new bridge, it can often be done so that most motorists aren't even aware of the slight shift.

For smaller overpasses, most of the NJ Turnpike overpasses that have been rebuilt were rebuilt right next to the original bridge, sometimes within a foot of the old bridge.

It's also common to build half of the new bridge just slightly off the current alignment.  When the old bridge is demolished, the remaining half of the new bridge is built in the vicinity of the old bridge.  Such is going on here at an old lift-bridge on US 130 in NJ: https://goo.gl/maps/teBqz8PkcSmJGuTp8 .  The lift bridge formerly held 4 lanes, no shoulders. The new SB overpass has been built here right next to the lift bridge and currently is hosting one lane per direction.  You can see the new bridge supports going up right where the lift bridge is located, which will eventually be for the Northbound lanes.  In the end, the new bridge will have 4 lanes and full shoulders.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Beltway on September 29, 2019, 11:26:52 PM
Happens on from the smallest bridges to the largest bridges.

The Woodrow Wilson Bridge on I-95/I-495 Capital Beltway.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: JKRhodes on September 29, 2019, 11:46:39 PM
Yep, this is done quite often.  When the roadway is slightly shifted to the new bridge, it can often be done so that most motorists aren't even aware of the slight shift.

This works well if the road is already somewhat curved. In my lifetime I've seen several bridges replaced in Arizona; the majority of them are on a straight stretch of road. The jog, while not hard to navigate, is pretty obvious. This tends to be amplified due to the fact that the newer bridges tend to have wider decks to accommodate more lanes, shoulders, sidewalks and other safety features. .
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: sprjus4 on September 30, 2019, 12:17:51 AM
I-10 over Escambia Bay outside of Pensacola, FL; also I-10 over Lake Pontchartrain outside of New Orleans, LA.

The shift is quite noticeable on both examples.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: TheStranger on September 30, 2019, 01:20:04 AM
Three bridge replacements in the last decade in the Bay Area have had this happen:

- the Treasure Island-Oakland portion of the Bay Bridge
- the southbound lanes of the Carquinez Bridge
- the northbound lanes of the Benicia Bridge

If I'm not mistaken, the same thing happened with the Dumbarton Bridge in the 1980s

Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: jakeroot on September 30, 2019, 01:51:21 AM
Yeah, this is definitely quite common. Still interesting!

A relatively cool example near me would be the McMillin Bridge (a concrete half-through truss bridge), along WA-162 between Sumner and Orting. The old bridge was wearing out quickly, but was on the register of historic places. They built a new bridge alongside the old one, rerouted the highway onto the new bridge (complete with a new curve in the highway), and left the old one exactly where it had been for about 70-ish years. It was designed by Homer Hadley, designer of the original US-10 Lake Washington Floating Bridge (sunk in 1990).

Google Maps Street View: https://goo.gl/maps/s9w3sCZfp7aZwSuS8
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: vdeane on September 30, 2019, 12:53:07 PM
Yep, this is done quite often.  When the roadway is slightly shifted to the new bridge, it can often be done so that most motorists aren't even aware of the slight shift.

This works well if the road is already somewhat curved. In my lifetime I've seen several bridges replaced in Arizona; the majority of them are on a straight stretch of road. The jog, while not hard to navigate, is pretty obvious. This tends to be amplified due to the fact that the newer bridges tend to have wider decks to accommodate more lanes, shoulders, sidewalks and other safety features. .
That jog when this happens on sufficiently straight roads is annoying.  Here's a local example (https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7801105,-73.6963742,3a,36y,196.62h,86.95t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sXR7NpOaoh26XhcpOpX5imQ!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DXR7NpOaoh26XhcpOpX5imQ%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D253.65137%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656).  Meanwhile, there are other cases like NY 441 over I-490 where it's not even possible to tell that the old bridge was next to the new one unless you remember the construction.

Yeah, this is definitely quite common. Still interesting!

A relatively cool example near me would be the McMillin Bridge (a concrete half-through truss bridge), along WA-162 between Sumner and Orting. The old bridge was wearing out quickly, but was on the register of historic places. They built a new bridge alongside the old one, rerouted the highway onto the new bridge (complete with a new curve in the highway), and left the old one exactly where it had been for about 70-ish years. It was designed by Homer Hadley, designer of the original US-10 Lake Washington Floating Bridge (sunk in 1990).

Google Maps Street View: https://goo.gl/maps/s9w3sCZfp7aZwSuS8
Reminds me of a similar situation on NY 5S (https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9341309,-74.2843328,3a,24.9y,41.86h,83.98t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sfoNZDWYhHhK9AJt0CrEcRQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656).  One bridge is an old rail bridge (and, currently, the road, though not in the street view), the other has the Erie Canal Trail.  Which one has the road and which one the trail seems to periodically be swapped.  The southern (former road, current trail) bridge was actually a temporary section of Thruway when the Thruway bridges over Schoharie Creek were washed out.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: JKRhodes on September 30, 2019, 11:29:31 PM
Quote
That jog when this happens on sufficiently straight roads is annoying.  Here's a local example (https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7801105,-73.6963742,3a,36y,196.62h,86.95t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sXR7NpOaoh26XhcpOpX5imQ!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DXR7NpOaoh26XhcpOpX5imQ%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D253.65137%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656).  Meanwhile, there are other cases like NY 441 over I-490 where it's not even possible to tell that the old bridge was next to the new one unless you remember the construction.


Wow that's a pretty sharp shift in alignment! I'd be worried about getting into a head-on collision with someone who isn't paying attention.

The bridge down the road from my house has a fairly pretty obvious jog, made more obvious by the deviation from the straight path of the power lines and irrigation ditch, nonetheless easy to navigate:
https://goo.gl/maps/BWg5fDoEEyrWuF4w7

About a half hour west of me, ADOT replaced a bridge on US 70 about 10 years ago near Bylas. Approaching from the east, the road is straight, and the jog is obvious. From the west, the road makes a turn, and the approach was tied in seamlessly to the curve in the road:

https://goo.gl/maps/WUUjxHcNcm8ACWR76

Side note: Google is making some amazing things happen with their 3D rendering technology.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: vdeane on October 01, 2019, 12:45:12 PM
Another example: while the new Seaway Bridge is mostly tied in like it was always there, there is a very noticeable jog (https://www.google.com/maps/@45.009457,-74.7394772,3a,75y,30.56h,93.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1suxDE-SxsNt2OQlAQjpE6Mg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656) at the toll plaza, which was built adjacent to one of the piers for the original bridge.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: fillup420 on October 01, 2019, 09:08:35 PM
hmmm so it seems this is very common. I guess NCDOT didn’t do a very good job because the roadway shift was quite noticeable, and they placed s-turn warning signs on either side.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: jeffandnicole on October 01, 2019, 10:16:14 PM
hmmm so it seems this is very common. I guess NCDOT didn’t do a very good job because the roadway shift was quite noticeable, and they placed s-turn warning signs on either side.

It's not that they didn't do a good job, but as shown above sometimes there's not much choice. 
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Bruce on October 02, 2019, 12:46:20 AM
The new SR 520 Floating Bridge in Seattle actually got rid of a jog in the original bridge on the west end. You can see the old bridge at right making an extra swoop coming off the original approach structure.

(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1yYls19Cywo/V2MYLfAg4gI/AAAAAAAACv4/tSMU-e7XcvYBLQB8-o_-AJwt48ZlAEvdwCLcB/s1600/1.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: kphoger on October 02, 2019, 01:34:54 PM
In Branson (MO), when they replaced the Taneycomo bridge, they left the old one up and open to traffic.  The new one serves Branson Landing directly, while the old one (previously/still US-65-Bus) skirts around the edge of that district.  Aerial view here. (https://goo.gl/maps/PbueiKRhjBGJD3wx6)  Street view here (https://goo.gl/maps/PMQNih7dJ9cUs7eo6).
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: GaryV on October 02, 2019, 03:25:37 PM
The M-104 drawbridge between Spring Lake and Ferrysburg was replaced in the mid-60's with a high bridge on a parallel line to the south.  Savidge St was reconstructed to the south, and a stub of old Savidge St remains to access the properties on the old bridge approach.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: KEVIN_224 on October 02, 2019, 04:23:07 PM
The Seabees Memorial Bridge along VT/NH Route 9, over the Connecticut River between Brattleboro, VT and Chesterfield, NH...

Heading west on NH Route 9 in Chesterfield (May 2017).
(https://i.imgur.com/siKamuR.jpg)

Heading east on VT Route 9 in Brattleboro, with the Amtrak bridge just before it (December 2016).
(https://i.imgur.com/sZRKaLq.jpg)

A better shot of the bridges from the Vermont side (May 2016).
(https://i.imgur.com/5WD3R3X.jpg)

The sign on the old span. It's only open for pedestrian use now.
(https://i.imgur.com/MC94exr.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: BrianP on October 02, 2019, 05:12:52 PM
A favorite of mine in MD:
https://goo.gl/maps/s8Jn48swKGHiAYZf6
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: US71 on October 21, 2019, 08:37:15 PM
Arkadelphia, AR

The original 1903 Ouachita River bridge was replaced by one immediately next to it in 1960.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Max Rockatansky on October 21, 2019, 08:41:03 PM
The 1928 Fanny Bridge on Legislative Route 38 (now CA 89) replaced the 1913 Lake Tahoe Dam which is less than a 100 feet away. 
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: RobbieL2415 on October 21, 2019, 09:23:44 PM
In CT:
-Sikorsky Bridge, Merritt Parkway, replacement completed 2006.  Former structure was infamous "upside-down" steel-girder design.

-Charter Oak Bridge, replaced 1991.  Last bridge to be under jurisdiction of now-defunct Greater Hartford Bridge Authority.  Last bridge to collect tolls.

-Pearl Harbor "Q" Memorial Bridge, replacement completed 2016.  Replaced 1958 structure.

-Mianus River Bridge, replacement complete 1992, replacing collapsed original structure.

-Baldwin Bridge, replacement complete 1993, replacing 1944 structure.

Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: SteveG1988 on October 22, 2019, 07:20:46 AM
Great Bay Blvd in New Jersey was built with narrow bridges off-center to allow for eventual replacement with regular bridges should the road be completed as intended, with a bridge over the great bay.

https://www.alpsroads.net/roads/nj/great_bay/
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: stevashe on October 27, 2019, 09:38:21 PM
New I-5 bridges in Tacoma over the Puyallup River, which actually straightens the freeway a bit by moving the bridge. Shown here is construction of the northbound bridge which is now complete. Currently both directions of mainline traffic are routed on the new northbound bridge while the old northbound bridge is demolished and the new southbound bridge is being built. Currently the old southbound bridge is also being used for traffic headed to the exit just on the other side of the river (Exit 135 to SR167 and Portland Ave), shown near the top of this photo.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/4427/37182975626_0de05469f6_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/YDJtdE)New northbound I-5 Puyallup River Bridge with SR 167 Ramp Bridge in Background (https://flic.kr/p/YDJtdE) by Washington State Dept of Transportation (https://www.flickr.com/photos/wsdot/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: jakeroot on October 28, 2019, 02:29:46 AM
New I-5 bridges in Tacoma over the Puyallup River, which actually straightens the freeway a bit by moving the bridge. Shown here is construction of the northbound bridge which is now complete. Currently both directions of mainline traffic are routed on the new northbound bridge while the old northbound bridge is demolished and the new southbound bridge is being built. Currently the old southbound bridge is also being used for traffic headed to the exit just on the other side of the river (Exit 135 to SR167 and Portland Ave), shown near the top of this photo.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/4427/37182975626_0de05469f6_c.jpg)
 (https://flic.kr/p/YDJtdE)

Totally forgot about this one!

Here's a diagram showing the current traffic movements. You can stay on I-5 using the old bridge, though it's signed as an "exit only" (it's really just a C/D lane).

(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NI6EsIYrhmw/XMdIitw1RlI/AAAAAAAAAuc/y2nHBniXJ24JjOBQI-v3vhUdJgKam2DmQCLcBGAs/s1600/PuyallupRiverBridgeMap_v5.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: sparker on November 03, 2019, 03:26:23 AM
Back in 1988-89 the I-5 dual (2+2) truss bridges over Cottonwood Creek and the UP RR tracks at Cottonwood, CA (between Red Bluff and Redding), which were separated by about 80 feet, were replaced by a single bridge, also 2+2, but with a K-rail down the middle.  This new structure was located in the former median between the two original bridges.  The rationale behind the replacement -- although the original bridges were only 24 years old at the time -- was that the combination of winter rains and extreme summer heat in the area had created fissures in the concrete around the bolts holding the structure to its anchorages, and at least one of the bridges had started to laterally shift as a result.  Those original bridges were notable as the only through truss bridges on I-5 in CA; the only other similar structure on that route, the deck truss (actual pavement running along the truss top) over the Sacramento River arm of Lake Shasta, was itself replaced a year or so ago. 
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Flint1979 on November 24, 2019, 08:39:22 PM
The two Zilwaukee Bridge's in Michigan. The new one is famous due to a construction accident while it was being built. I pretty much watched that bridge get built as I lived about a mile from it growing up.(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20191125/03d363426140a79c4dbc063615561b96.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Beltway on November 24, 2019, 09:35:17 PM
The Woodrow Wilson Bridge on I-95/I-495 Capital Beltway.

(http://www.capital-beltway.com/WWB-Aerial-Jan3107-24m.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 25, 2019, 07:23:59 AM
This definitely isn't as extreme as the other examples, but the EB-NB ramp at the I-78/287 interchange in Bedminster was subject to this. They also changed the shape of a ramp to a sort of cloverleaf.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: ilpt4u on December 13, 2019, 11:50:03 PM
ISTHA is doing this right now, replacing the Mile Long Bridge with a brand new, adjacent bridge, as part of the Central Tri-State Reconstruction and Widening Project on I-294:

IDOT District 9 did this recently, on a much smaller scale, moving the Approach roadway and building a new bridge, just west of the old one, over Beaucoup Creek just north of Murphysboro, IL on IL 13/127. Some of the old Approach Roadway pavement was left in place, but the old bridge was demolished:
https://goo.gl/maps/CgZUF3SX4Z49S2Q18
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: US 89 on June 03, 2020, 06:56:08 PM
Old and new crossings of the White River on SR 45 near Bonanza, Utah:

(https://i.imgur.com/Wtf0SqF.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Tom958 on June 13, 2020, 08:19:36 AM
2014 AASHTO beam bridge built just outboard of a 1937 open-spandrel arch bridge. There's a third plate girder bridge, too, from when the new eastbound roadway was added in 1974.

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.8810939,-83.5925065,3a,48y,57.63h,70.37t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sM-FpjbSiPrCkoVcdaQLfYg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Stephane Dumas on June 13, 2020, 09:17:08 AM
The Daniel Boone bridge on the Missouri river. The original 1935 span got a twin bridge in 1989 build to the west and a newer span in 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Boone_Bridge
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: webny99 on June 13, 2020, 01:44:24 PM
Well, there's the Tappan Zee outside New York City

Yes, that's certainly one of the more prominent ones of this century, maybe even ever.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: catch22 on June 13, 2020, 06:46:27 PM
US-12 over the St. Joseph River, Mottville, MI.

https://goo.gl/maps/USqUETa5aZ63fqN78
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: zzcarp on June 14, 2020, 09:50:21 PM
I remember this beautiful rainbow arch bridge (https://www.google.com/maps/@41.3367316,-82.1213963,3a,47.4y,46.06h,88.73t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sn9C6lphcQ7STpR-J6fHRRA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192) built ca. 1923 on Oberlin-Elyria Road (former US 20) in Elyria, Ohio. Sometime in the 1960's they constructed a parallel 2-lane span for eastbound traffic, leaving the old arch in service for westbound traffic. After US 20 was moved to the bypass in 1988, ODOT replaced the newer 2-lane span with the current 4-lane span and took the rainbow arch out of service prior to relinquishing the old highway to Lorain County.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Big John on June 14, 2020, 11:34:30 PM
WI 54 / Mason St on Green Bay: narrow and low truss bridge was replaced with a new bridge in 1973. They closed the south sidewalk of the old bridge to fit the new bridge in.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: catch22 on June 15, 2020, 05:55:53 PM
I remember this beautiful rainbow arch bridge (https://www.google.com/maps/@41.3367316,-82.1213963,3a,47.4y,46.06h,88.73t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sn9C6lphcQ7STpR-J6fHRRA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192) built ca. 1923 on Oberlin-Elyria Road (former US 20) in Elyria, Ohio. Sometime in the 1960's they constructed a parallel 2-lane span for eastbound traffic, leaving the old arch in service for westbound traffic. After US 20 was moved to the bypass in 1988, ODOT replaced the newer 2-lane span with the current 4-lane span and took the rainbow arch out of service prior to relinquishing the old highway to Lorain County.

There's a similar bridge, also out of service, parallel to I-75 just north of Eagleville Road (Exit 168).  I'm guessing this was the original US-25 routing before the freeway was built:

https://goo.gl/maps/f2YyJjm96TZkv1iR6
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: ozarkman417 on June 15, 2020, 07:26:50 PM
This will soon be the case with AR 7 over the Buffalo National River (https://www.google.com/maps/@36.0611583,-93.1381212,3a,75y,152.05h,80.99t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1s8B4sETV-6nmnB79yDpT5oA!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3D8B4sETV-6nmnB79yDpT5oA%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D162.44731%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656), provided the plan is still to keep the bridge as a pedestrian crossing. Camera is aimed at the position of what would now be a pillar that was somewhat recently placed.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: D-Dey65 on June 15, 2020, 07:49:34 PM
I've mentioned NY 25-25A over the Nissequogue River in the past.

Of course in Florida there's US 90 over the Suwannee River. Northeast of there, US 129 has two former crossings nearby... okay, one of those was demolished, but the road that lead to the old crossing is still there.
 
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: jmacswimmer on June 15, 2020, 08:06:34 PM
MD 34/WV 480 over the Potomac River (https://www.google.com/maps/@39.4374685,-77.7985337,3a,37.5y,246.62h,87.49t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sDF8Or6NsF-_UuKbHyj3v8Q!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?hl=en) near Shepherdstown, WV.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: GaryV on June 16, 2020, 09:12:43 AM
Camel-back bridge near Nunica MI that is right next to I-96: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0745769,-86.0521176,3a,75y,255.98h,94.24t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1shqCj-ViUI8VgsUrJNU9-kA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?hl=en

I'd guess this used to be US-16 (and maybe M-16 before that).

As kids we liked seeing this bridge because it meant we were nearing the beach in Grand Haven.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: M3100 on June 20, 2020, 11:24:41 PM
In the Long Beach, CA harbor area, Ocean Blvd. crosses the Cerritos Channel on the Gerald Desmond bridge, to connect Terminal Island to Long Beach.  This section of road is not currently signed though in Wikipedia it is shown as a section of I-710.  The new Gerald Desmond bridge may carry the I-710 designation; I'm not sure.  It is scheduled to open within a year.   These pics show:
(1) The new and old bridges (facing east), and
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50027235023_e0381d412c.jpg)

(2) The construction bypass on the east side of the Cerritos Channel where the new bridge will have an elevated connector to the I-710.
Note the blocked westbound lanes have a sign directing travelers to CA-47 [just below the traffic light near center of photo].
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50027775171_16dd3d5f2a.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: MCRoads on July 10, 2020, 02:04:57 AM
Here (https://goo.gl/maps/e2raNn2eM63y5o1D6) is my favorite example of this. The service road was US 66, and used the arch bridge. Then, the interstate got built, and, if you look at both the bridges, it looks like the interstate used to use the arch bridge, because the 2 highway bridges were not built at the same time, made obvious by the structural differences. The service road then used the arch bridge until it too was replaced, the bridge the service road is on being the newest. Maybe someone from the area will correct me, but I believe that is how that went.

So there you go, 4 different bridges, built right next to each other, all at different times.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: SteveG1988 on July 10, 2020, 01:55:33 PM
Here (https://goo.gl/maps/e2raNn2eM63y5o1D6) is my favorite example of this. The service road was US 66, and used the arch bridge. Then, the interstate got built, and, if you look at both the bridges, it looks like the interstate used to use the arch bridge, because the 2 highway bridges were not built at the same time, made obvious by the structural differences. The service road then used the arch bridge until it too was replaced, the bridge the service road is on being the newest. Maybe someone from the area will correct me, but I believe that is how that went.

So there you go, 4 different bridges, built right next to each other, all at different times.

The Truss (not arch) bridge carried traffic until 1997 when the new bridge to the north was built.

The Eastbound 40 bridge was replaced recently: https://www.abqjournal.com/31126/breaking-partial-collapse-reported-on-i-40-bridge-at-rio-puerco-exit.htm
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: M3100 on July 13, 2020, 12:33:15 AM
This shows the original Greenspot Road bridge across the Santa Ana River in East Highlands, CA (San Bernardino County).  This is not a numbered highway; these pictures are from December 2011.  Since that time, the bridge was replaced by a modern concrete structure downriver.  That is the Seven Oaks Dam in the distance.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50106354078_5954f1250e.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50106925116_6b58bbda57.jpg)
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: rte66man on July 14, 2020, 02:08:18 PM
My favorite is in Tulsa, OK:
https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1429036,-96.0080441,1277m/data=!3m1!1e3

The original 11th Street bridge carried US66 for many years.  The two I-244 bridges were added in the 70's. The 'new' 11th Street bridge was built in the 80's and the original was left as an architectural example.
https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1440903,-96.0032693,3a,75y,263h,84.31t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1swY97Pg-BHDHuKF5torpdfA!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DwY97Pg-BHDHuKF5torpdfA%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D161.06992%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i16384!8i8192

The westbound I-244 bridge was replaced a few years ago with a double deck, the roadway on the top with a lower deck for future passenger rail use.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: mrsman on July 14, 2020, 08:25:23 PM
Is the original bridge used at all now?  It would seem perfect for bikes.

Nexus 5X

Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on July 15, 2020, 02:36:07 PM
The new MN 24 bridge over the Mississippi River between Clearwater and Clear Lake did this.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: US71 on July 16, 2020, 11:13:03 AM
MoDOT recently announced the  Long Creek Bridge  (http://bridgehunter.com/mo/taney/long-creek/) on MO 86 will be replaced with a bridge next to it.
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: rte66man on July 18, 2020, 06:29:09 PM
Is the original bridge used at all now?  It would seem perfect for bikes.

Nexus 5X



The original intent was to use it as a combination ped/bike crossing but it is on the wrong side of the new bridge. There is a nice plaza at the north end but there is a large wrought iron fence that appears to fully block access.

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1442118,-96.0031466,3a,75y,276.93h,93.93t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZXzuWBi30RiAzr_VptFG9w!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
Title: Re: Bridges replaced directly next to the old one
Post by: Max Rockatansky on July 18, 2020, 07:41:22 PM
Apparently the Rio Dell Bridge on US 101 was built alongside its predecessor circa 1941.  The previous bridge opened in 1914 as part of the Redwood Highway and was condemned once it was replaced.