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SignBridge:
There are a few highways in NYC that are wider. Grand Central Parkway in Queens was widened to eight lanes in 1963 from the Brooklyn-Queens Expwy (I-278) to the Kew Gardens Interchange.

And more recently the Staten Island Expwy was widened to include an HOV/Bus Lane in each direction in addition to the original six lanes. This was done by converting the wide median into additional lanes. Not sure if it was originally built in 1964 with that intent, but some NYC area roads were built that way in the Robert Moses era so it's possible.

Also, part of the Bruckner Expwy (I-95) in The Bronx is eight lanes between the Hutchinson River Pkwy and I-695.

roadman65:
NJ is the same with NJ 495. Itís at six lanes with hour long waits into the Lincoln Tunnel and could use the removal of the two frontage roads to do it. However, youíre not only talking about destroying neighborhoods but blasting through solid rock there too. Very costly on that.

Alps:

--- Quote from: bluecountry on October 08, 2022, 07:25:31 PM ---
--- Quote from: SignBridge on October 01, 2022, 08:27:06 PM ---The problem was not so much that the CBX was built, but the cut-throat way it was designed and executed. The route could have been slightly different to have spared at least one neighborhood but that wasn't done because of politics. And the residents who were displaced by the road could and should have been treated much better than they were.
 
Had those things been done, the CBX might not have the bad reputation that it does today.

Some design features might have been a little different as well, but remember this was almost seventy years ago and the highway was typical of 1950's era design and six-lane highways in the NYC area were the norm at that time. Building it any wider was probably not possible anyway due to space constraints.

--- End quote ---
Moses easily could have shifted it south with less destruction but I believe his business associates/friends wanted it where it was placed.

--- End quote ---
No, he did. He said "my way or the highway".

SidS1045:

--- Quote from: Rothman on October 08, 2022, 08:23:09 PM ---
--- Quote from: bluecountry on October 08, 2022, 07:25:31 PM ---
--- Quote from: SignBridge on October 01, 2022, 08:27:06 PM ---The problem was not so much that the CBX was built, but the cut-throat way it was designed and executed. The route could have been slightly different to have spared at least one neighborhood but that wasn't done because of politics. And the residents who were displaced by the road could and should have been treated much better than they were.
 
Had those things been done, the CBX might not have the bad reputation that it does today.

Some design features might have been a little different as well, but remember this was almost seventy years ago and the highway was typical of 1950's era design and six-lane highways in the NYC area were the norm at that time. Building it any wider was probably not possible anyway due to space constraints.

--- End quote ---
Moses easily could have shifted it south with less destruction but I believe his business associates/friends wanted it where it was placed.

--- End quote ---
*citation needed*

--- End quote ---

The chapter "One Mile" in The Power Broker.  The old Third Avenue Bus Company, which had its depot where Robert Moses originally wanted to place the CBX, had lots of political clout and successfully pressured him to move it north of their depot into the midst of the apartment buildings of East Tremont, inhabited by people with no political clout.

Rothman:



--- Quote from: SidS1045 on October 12, 2022, 01:35:53 PM ---
--- Quote from: Rothman on October 08, 2022, 08:23:09 PM ---
--- Quote from: bluecountry on October 08, 2022, 07:25:31 PM ---
--- Quote from: SignBridge on October 01, 2022, 08:27:06 PM ---The problem was not so much that the CBX was built, but the cut-throat way it was designed and executed. The route could have been slightly different to have spared at least one neighborhood but that wasn't done because of politics. And the residents who were displaced by the road could and should have been treated much better than they were.
 
Had those things been done, the CBX might not have the bad reputation that it does today.

Some design features might have been a little different as well, but remember this was almost seventy years ago and the highway was typical of 1950's era design and six-lane highways in the NYC area were the norm at that time. Building it any wider was probably not possible anyway due to space constraints.

--- End quote ---
Moses easily could have shifted it south with less destruction but I believe his business associates/friends wanted it where it was placed.

--- End quote ---
*citation needed*

--- End quote ---

The chapter "One Mile" in The Power Broker.  The old Third Avenue Bus Company, which had its depot where Robert Moses originally wanted to place the CBX, had lots of political clout and successfully pressured him to move it north of their depot into the midst of the apartment buildings of East Tremont, inhabited by people with no political clout.

--- End quote ---

I agree with The Power Broker's account, which is not what was described by bluecountry.

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