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The US Route 2 and US Route 97 Concurrency in Chelan and Douglas Counties, WA

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Amaury:
So, in this concurrency, US Route 2 is the primary route and therefore its mileposts are used. My question is simple. If anyone knows, was there a realignment of this, particularly of US Route 2, at some point? The reason I ask is because there's a gap in the mileposts after crossing over into Douglas County from Chelan County heading east via the Richard Odabashian Bridge (I'm going by east since mileposts, of course, increase west to east).

So, here we have US Route 2 milepost 120: https://goo.gl/maps/Y3zKGcxbHPy9ktHe6

That means the next one should logically be milepost 121. However, after making the turn left at the light—the junction with Washington State Route 28, where the route begins if you turn right—the next milepost is actually milepost 128: https://goo.gl/maps/dRTCzYsLGELt6NmN6

That's an eight-mile difference! Hence why I ask if there was a realignment at some point that significantly shortened that route and they just, for whatever reason, didn't bother to readjust the mileposts to that.

Mapmikey:

--- Quote from: Amaury on October 01, 2022, 03:58:32 PM ---So, in this concurrency, US Route 2 is the primary route and therefore its mileposts are used. My question is simple. If anyone knows, was there a realignment of this, particularly of US Route 2, at some point? The reason I ask is because there's a gap in the mileposts after crossing over into Douglas County from Chelan County heading east via the Richard Odabashian Bridge (I'm going by east since mileposts, of course, increase west to east).

So, here we have US Route 2 milepost 120: https://goo.gl/maps/Y3zKGcxbHPy9ktHe6

That means the next one should logically be milepost 121. However, after making the turn left at the light—the junction with Washington State Route 28, where the route begins if you turn right—the next milepost is actually milepost 128: https://goo.gl/maps/dRTCzYsLGELt6NmN6

That's an eight-mile difference! Hence why I ask if there was a realignment at some point that significantly shortened that route and they just, for whatever reason, didn't bother to readjust the mileposts to that.

--- End quote ---

US 2 used today's WA 285 to WA 28 north until the mid 1970s.

Bruce:
The Richard Odabashian Bridge opened in 1975 and US 2 was rerouted across it. US 97 joined it in 1987 when it was rerouted to the east side of the Columbia River and the old alignment became US 97A.

There's plenty of milepost "corrections" that are noted in the State Highway Log that are more dramatic than this. SR 530, for example, begins at milepost 17 due to its truncation.

Amaury:

--- Quote from: Mapmikey on October 01, 2022, 05:11:57 PM ---US 2 used today's WA 285 to WA 28 north until the mid 1970s.
--- End quote ---

I've read the US Route 2 in Washington article in Washington before, but from what you said above, I just made the connection, though this sentence is still kind of vague, as it doesn't really say where the former alignment, but I can fill in the lines with what you said.


--- Quote from: Wikipedia ---US 2 was routed north of Wenatchee onto the Olds Station Bridge, renamed in 1991 to honor Richard Odabashian, over the Columbia River in 1975,[67] while the former alignment was designated as SR 285 in 1977.
--- End quote ---

So my guess is that it was something like this for the former alignment of US Route 2 in Wenatchee/East Wenatchee: https://goo.gl/maps/4iPansY392NVBeZv8

I have my start point there as US Route 2 milepost 118 and my end point as US Route 2 milepost 128. With the way I routed it to get from point A to point B, Google Maps shows a distance of roughly 10 miles (10.2), so if I'm correct or roughly correct on what the former alignment of US Route 2 was in that area, that would explain the eight-mile gap as the routing I have fits the gap exactly. Although it makes me wonder if Washington State Route 28 didn't exist then or if US Route 2 was also (formerly) concurrent with Washington State Route 28 instead of just being concurrent with US Route 97 in that area at present time.

Whatever the case, with how important US Route 2 is, I'm rather surprised that they didn't adjust the mileposts in Washington to reflect the change from milepost 128 to the Washington-Idaho border in Newport, Washington, and vice-versa for US Route 2's mileposts on the westbound side between Newport and milepost 128 near the Washington State Route 28 junction in Wenatchee. For example, if they were to correct things, milepost 128 would actually be milepost 121 and so forth.

Mapmikey:
It appears the street addresses in the rural areas match the mile markers as they were originally laid out, so this might preclude re-doing mile markers to avoid having to also change everybody’s address.

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