AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state  (Read 9195 times)

Flint1979

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6730
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Michigan
  • Last Login: Today at 12:03:50 AM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #100 on: March 09, 2020, 11:16:27 PM »

K-6 was replaced by other routes, mostly U.S. 59. K-12 was decommissioned when it became annexed entirely into the city limits of the towns along its route, which is not allowed under KDOT policy.

K-17 was decommissioned in 2013 when K-14 was rerouted. Part of the old routing of K-14 was designated K-11, which had not existed since a previous version was decommissioned in the late 1950s (the original K-11 is now K-99).
So that means that a state highway can't start in a city and end in the same city or a continuation of cities? If so that makes sense.
Logged

apeman33

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 324
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Garden City, KS
  • Last Login: April 16, 2022, 12:57:55 AM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #101 on: March 16, 2020, 06:02:27 PM »

K-6 was replaced by other routes, mostly U.S. 59. K-12 was decommissioned when it became annexed entirely into the city limits of the towns along its route, which is not allowed under KDOT policy.

K-17 was decommissioned in 2013 when K-14 was rerouted. Part of the old routing of K-14 was designated K-11, which had not existed since a previous version was decommissioned in the late 1950s (the original K-11 is now K-99).
So that means that a state highway can't start in a city and end in the same city or a continuation of cities? If so that makes sense.

Yes, exactly. It has led to the decommissioning of several short K-spurs after the cities they served decided to annex along the route leading up to the intersection of a through highway or exit to an interstate.
Logged

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 17525
  • It is well, it is well, with my soul.

  • Age: 60
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 08:24:38 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #102 on: March 17, 2020, 12:17:51 PM »

K-6 was replaced by other routes, mostly U.S. 59. K-12 was decommissioned when it became annexed entirely into the city limits of the towns along its route, which is not allowed under KDOT policy.

K-17 was decommissioned in 2013 when K-14 was rerouted. Part of the old routing of K-14 was designated K-11, which had not existed since a previous version was decommissioned in the late 1950s (the original K-11 is now K-99).
So that means that a state highway can't start in a city and end in the same city or a continuation of cities? If so that makes sense.

Yes, exactly. It has led to the decommissioning of several short K-spurs after the cities they served decided to annex along the route leading up to the intersection of a through highway or exit to an interstate.

Care to elaborate? Is there a policy that a signed state route must connect two towns or something?
Logged


I identify as vaccinated.

dvferyance

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1485
  • Location: New Berlin WI
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 10:05:54 PM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #103 on: March 19, 2020, 09:03:58 PM »

I know Indiana doesn't allow it. The state highways follow the same system the US highway system does. Even highways run east and west and start with 2 in the northern part of the state and odd highways run north and south and start with 1 in the eastern part of the state.

In fact I believe one of the US highways I think it's US-40 falls in the same area that Indiana 40 would be in. It's in between Indiana 38 and 42. US-6 I believe falls in that as well.

Yes, Indiana does not allow US/State route duplication.  IN 35 was renumbered to IN 135 when US 35 was introduced into Indiana.  IN 6 coincidentally was the route that US 6 took through the state.

Duplication of Interstate/State routes is allowed.  64, 69, and 70 all exist on both state routes and interstates.

To me 64 being duplicated is strange since IN-64 runs parrellel not too far north of I-64. And has it's eastern terminus at I-64.
And now IN 69 isn't far from I-69 either.
Logged

sturmde

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 145
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Bangor, Maine, USA
  • Last Login: May 16, 2022, 05:59:52 PM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #104 on: March 21, 2020, 02:01:42 AM »

US 2 is signed in NY (as well as NY 2). :D
It's logged as 2U though.  Longest distance for sure for a suffixed route from its parent! :)
Logged

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14922
  • Nit picker of unprecedented pedantry

  • Age: 32
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 05:46:17 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #105 on: March 21, 2020, 02:48:03 AM »

K-6 was replaced by other routes, mostly U.S. 59. K-12 was decommissioned when it became annexed entirely into the city limits of the towns along its route, which is not allowed under KDOT policy.

K-17 was decommissioned in 2013 when K-14 was rerouted. Part of the old routing of K-14 was designated K-11, which had not existed since a previous version was decommissioned in the late 1950s (the original K-11 is now K-99).
So that means that a state highway can't start in a city and end in the same city or a continuation of cities? If so that makes sense.

Yes, exactly. It has led to the decommissioning of several short K-spurs after the cities they served decided to annex along the route leading up to the intersection of a through highway or exit to an interstate.

Care to elaborate? Is there a policy that a signed state route must connect two towns or something?

As I understand it, it must pass through unincorporated territory at some point.
Logged

achilles765

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 358
  • Interstate 14 should connect Austin and Houston

  • Age: 36
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Last Login: May 10, 2022, 12:07:11 PM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #106 on: January 10, 2022, 06:27:38 AM »

Texas doesn't have a State Highway 1.  The original version ran roughly along I-10 from El Paso to I-20, the roughly along I-20 to DFW (going through Mineral Wells), and then roughly along I-30 to Texarkana.  In 1939 it was reduced to a short section in Dallas.  In 1953 to designation was removed.  In the designation file, it says "NOTE:  THIS STATE HIGHWAY NUMBER MAY ONLY BE ASSIGNED BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OR THE TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION."

Maybe not a SH 1, but there are multiple state-level highways numbered 1 in Texas like Loop 1, FM 1, Ranch Road 1, and NASA Road 1...

Actually, there is a Loop 1 and an FM 1...but not an RM 1...FM and RM routes don't duplicate numbers...they are one system.  NASA Road 1 I don't think counts as a "1"...its just a regular state highway

There is no SH 2, 28, 38...and a few others though.
Logged
I love freeways and roads in any state but Texas will always be first in my heart

BlueOutback7

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 697
  • Wicked Good Clam Chowdah!

  • Location: Massachusetts
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 10:45:39 PM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #107 on: January 10, 2022, 07:45:49 AM »

Texas doesn't have a State Highway 1.  The original version ran roughly along I-10 from El Paso to I-20, the roughly along I-20 to DFW (going through Mineral Wells), and then roughly along I-30 to Texarkana.  In 1939 it was reduced to a short section in Dallas.  In 1953 to designation was removed.  In the designation file, it says "NOTE:  THIS STATE HIGHWAY NUMBER MAY ONLY BE ASSIGNED BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OR THE TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION."

Maybe not a SH 1, but there are multiple state-level highways numbered 1 in Texas like Loop 1, FM 1, Ranch Road 1, and NASA Road 1...

Actually, there is a Loop 1 and an FM 1...but not an RM 1...FM and RM routes don't duplicate numbers...they are one system.  NASA Road 1 I don't think counts as a "1"...its just a regular state highway

There is no SH 2, 28, 38...and a few others though.

You forgot about I-2 in the Rio Grande Valley.
Logged
"I'm not crazy, my mother had me tested.”

Sheldon Cooper - The Big Bang Theory

My Flickr Page
https://www.flickr.com/photos/195026169@N03/

WillWeaverRVA

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1840
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Richmond, VA
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 10:31:27 AM
    • WillWeaverRVA Photography
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #108 on: January 10, 2022, 08:48:47 AM »

Virginia currently does not have a Route 12, a Route 44, or a Route 104.
Logged
Will Weaver
WillWeaverRVA Photography | Twitter

"But how will the oxen know where to drown if we renumber the Oregon Trail?" - NE2

Mapmikey

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3878
  • Co-curator with Froggie of www.vahighways.com

  • Age: 52
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 08:59:07 PM
    • Co-curator Virginia Highways Project
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #109 on: January 10, 2022, 09:15:06 AM »

Virginia currently does not have a Route 12, a Route 44, or a Route 104.

Nor a route 25 or 88
Logged

US 89

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4889
  • 189 to Evanston!

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:07:48 AM
    • Utah Highways
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #110 on: January 10, 2022, 09:16:17 AM »

Texas doesn't have a State Highway 1.  The original version ran roughly along I-10 from El Paso to I-20, the roughly along I-20 to DFW (going through Mineral Wells), and then roughly along I-30 to Texarkana.  In 1939 it was reduced to a short section in Dallas.  In 1953 to designation was removed.  In the designation file, it says "NOTE:  THIS STATE HIGHWAY NUMBER MAY ONLY BE ASSIGNED BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OR THE TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION."

Maybe not a SH 1, but there are multiple state-level highways numbered 1 in Texas like Loop 1, FM 1, Ranch Road 1, and NASA Road 1...

Actually, there is a Loop 1 and an FM 1...but not an RM 1...FM and RM routes don't duplicate numbers...they are one system.  NASA Road 1 I don't think counts as a "1"...its just a regular state highway

Not RM 1, Ranch Road 1, the road that goes by LBJ's ranch. Although you probably don't think that counts, given that it is the only "Ranch Road" in the state...

Dirt Roads

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1553
  • Location: Central North Carolina
  • Last Login: May 20, 2022, 12:46:26 AM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #111 on: January 10, 2022, 11:23:13 AM »

Not sure how I ever missed this thread:

HB, did you mention how WV does not have a primary highway 1?

There's no WV-1 either.

Nope, I forgot about there being no WV 1. There are plenty of CR 1's, though.

West Virginia definitely had a route 1

See - http://www.vahighways.com/wvannex/route-log/wv001.htm

On your old WV Highways late from years ago, that was where I learned that WV has never had a primary 1.

And to make things worse, here's some more of this mess from the Appalachian Corridor D thread:

the 1938 Official has the one-way couplet in Clarksburg using Oak St to get back to Pike St.

The WV 1 page attempts to identify the 1926 routing of US 50...

We were taught in West Virginia History Class that WV Route 1 was the old Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike.  Much later in life do I find out that WV-1 became US-50 over its entire length.  They are nearly the same west of Clarksburg, but the history fact book had this all wrong.  Wish I could find a copy. 

The Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike didn't go near Clarksburg. It passed through Weston.

Oops.  I saw Elkins, Buckhannon and Weston on the map and kept thinking Elkins, Philippi and Clarksburg.  I've travelled WV-47 a bunch of times and <remainder of post now missing>

So to clarify, the old West Virginia History textbook (which I still can't find) said some thing like:
Quote from: pseudo-quote
The original West Virginia Route 1 was the old Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike.  It has since been replaced by US-50 and US-250.

Looking back at this, there are so many things wrong here.  It doesn't appear that any of WV-1 was ever located along the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike (as Bitmapped eluded to, much of the western end of the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike is now WV-47, but it veered off and went to Weston).  And although it may be correct from a view from Outer Space, it is also not technically correct that the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike was replaced by US-50 and US-250.  There are some facts that would be better to forget.
Logged

JayhawkCO

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4483
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Aurora, CO
  • Last Login: Today at 12:01:48 AM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #112 on: January 10, 2022, 01:46:56 PM »

Doesn't look like anyone ever did Colorado in this thread.  We can categorize those that we're missing under 100 like so:

Don't Currently Exist to Prevent Confusion with U.S. Highways or Interstates
CO6, CO24, CO25, CO34, CO50, CO70, CO84, CO85, CO87

Used To Exist But Don't Share Numbers with Current U.S. Highways or Interstates
CO4 - Became I-70 and US24 between Utah and Kansas
CO19 - Became US550 between New Mexico and Montrose
CO20 - Became US50, BL70, and US6 near Grand Junction
CO31 - Became County Line Road (between Arapahoe and Douglas Counties)
CO43 - Was a spur from US24 to Bethune, currently CR40
CO48 - Was a spur from CO109 (now CR109) west near Hugo (don't know which road it is currently)
CO49 - Became US36 between Denver and Boulder
CO54 - Became US34 between Brush and Nebraska
CO73 - Downgraded to Jefferson CR 73
CO77 - Downgraded to Park CR77
CO81 - Became I-76 between Denver and Wiggins
CO98 - Became CO74 between Evergreen and Brookvale
CO99 - Became CO142 between San Luis and Costilla CR10, and then CR10 down to New Mexico

KCRoadFan

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 667
  • Enthusiastic fan of roads, sports, and waterparks.

  • Age: 28
  • Location: Kansas City, MO
  • Last Login: Today at 02:14:20 AM
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #113 on: January 10, 2022, 02:43:18 PM »

I believe that in Nevada, almost all of the state highway numbers are 3 digits; the few two-digit numbers are extensions of highways in other states (for example, NV 28 in the Lake Tahoe area, which is a continuation of CA 28). Is that right?
Logged

US 89

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4889
  • 189 to Evanston!

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:07:48 AM
    • Utah Highways
Re: Common highway numbers that aren't found in your state
« Reply #114 on: January 10, 2022, 02:52:13 PM »

I believe that in Nevada, almost all of the state highway numbers are 3 digits; the few two-digit numbers are extensions of highways in other states (for example, NV 28 in the Lake Tahoe area, which is a continuation of CA 28). Is that right?

Yes. Since 1976, most all of Nevada's primary state routes have 3-digit numbers in the 100-499 range, which are clustered by the county they're in, in alphabetical order. The next block of numbers (500-699) is for urban state routes, which are clustered by metropolitan area city name in alphabetical order (Carson City, Elko, Las Vegas, Reno). Finally, the last block (700-899) is for secondary state routes, again clustered by county in alphabetical order.

There are only three exceptions to this rule, and they are all primary state highways that connect to something in another state: the aforementioned NV 28, as well as NV 88 (connects to CA 88) and NV 140 (connects to OR 140).

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.