AARoads Forum

Non-Road Boards => Off-Topic => Topic started by: bandit957 on August 12, 2020, 08:16:48 AM

Title: Favorite decades
Post by: bandit957 on August 12, 2020, 08:16:48 AM
What decades in your lifetime were the best?

The 1970s were my favorite of all. Each one after that was progressively worse, until the 2010s, which were probably better than the 1990s or 2000s.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: cjk374 on August 27, 2020, 09:41:08 AM
80s all the way baybeee! 👍👍
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Flint1979 on August 27, 2020, 10:10:47 AM
1980's even though I was pretty young.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: formulanone on August 27, 2020, 10:33:13 AM
Give or take a few seconds, they're all the same.

Terrifying lows, dizzying highs, and creamy middles in all of them.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Henry on August 27, 2020, 10:38:19 AM
I'd take the 80s over any other decade too!
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on August 27, 2020, 10:46:40 AM
Give or take a few seconds, they're all the same.
Terrifying lows, dizzying highs, and creamy middles in all of them.

LOL, well put... although who knows about the 2020's?

I always thought the 90's seemed like a cool decade, even though I was only around for the last few months of them.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: hbelkins on August 27, 2020, 12:51:12 PM
1960s -- I was born in '61 and don't have a lot of memories about growing up. My childhood was decidedly average.

1970s -- The Nixon and Carter administrations, two energy crises, typical teenage angst, three very brutal winters in a row (1977, '78, and '79), graduating from high school and starting college. The most redeeming part of the 70s, to me, was the classic music.

1980s -- Graduating from college, my first real romantic relationship, entering the workforce, losing my mother, changing jobs. Lots of ups and downs, but again, the music was a high point (other than those three terrible Rush albums that came along after "Signals;" I could do without those.)

1990s -- A traumatic breakup, changing jobs, getting married, moving four times in the span of a couple of years, getting involved in roadgeeking in a big way, discovering the Internet. One of the most eventful of my decades.

2000s -- Changing jobs three times in the span of a couple of years, moving back home, getting involved in politics.

2010s -- Probably the worst of my decades. Lost my father, tough financial times.

Some big life events have happened in all those decades. In terms of music, the 70s and 80s are best. For sports, the 70s and probably 90s. (Big Red Machine, UK championships in '78, '96 and '98). Television? Loved a lot of the '70s sitcoms. Movies? Definitely '70s and '80s.

I guess it all depends on what criteria you're using to determine favorites.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on August 27, 2020, 12:56:41 PM
I've been alive for four decades, and I look back at them with progressively less fondness.  That is to say, each decade has been worse than the one before it.  I miss the America of my childhood.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on August 27, 2020, 12:57:54 PM
I always thought the 90's seemed like a cool decade, even though I was only around for the last few months of them.

They were, in my opinion.  The 1990s were a sort of transitional period, culturally.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on August 27, 2020, 02:15:06 PM
three very brutal winters in a row (1977, '78, and '79)

You must have lived somewhere else than Kentucky at that point?
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on August 27, 2020, 02:20:54 PM
I miss the America of my childhood.

I think a lot of people do right now. It's hard not to, in 2020.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: noelbotevera on August 27, 2020, 03:37:44 PM
The 2010s, probably because that's the only decade I remember.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: GaryV on August 27, 2020, 03:42:04 PM
The 1340's.  Just because.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on August 27, 2020, 03:47:03 PM

I miss the America of my childhood.

I think a lot of people do right now. It's hard not to, in 2020.

For reasons kind of unrelated to recent events, actually.

I miss kids playing outdoors.
I miss life before smart phones.
I miss religious and non-religious people getting along.
I miss good TV sitcoms.
I miss the time before "I'm offended".
Ahh, nostalgia...........
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on August 27, 2020, 03:48:53 PM
The 1340's.  Just because.

The Hundred Years' War must have been a real bummer.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: 1 on August 27, 2020, 04:01:19 PM
1860s, because of coin collecting. I have a decent number of coins from that decade in both the US and other countries (including a US 2¢ coin), but very few from earlier.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: SEWIGuy on August 27, 2020, 04:27:48 PM
The 1340's.  Just because.

The Hundred Years' War must have been a real bummer.


And the Black Death. 
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: golden eagle on August 27, 2020, 10:27:14 PM
80s!
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Revive 755 on August 27, 2020, 10:48:19 PM
90's:

* It was prior to the 9/11 security/culture changes
* It was prior to the large amount of red light cameras/speed cameras used today in many places
* At least part of the decade had better speed limits in some of the states
* Lots of sci-fi shows on TV
* Some internet, but not the amount of today
* Lots of 80's music on the radio still
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: brad2971 on August 27, 2020, 10:58:30 PM
90's:

* It was prior to the 9/11 security/culture changes
* It was prior to the large amount of red light cameras/speed cameras used today in many places
* At least part of the decade had better speed limits in some of the states
* Lots of sci-fi shows on TV
* Some internet, but not the amount of today
* Lots of 80's music on the radio still

While this child born in 1971 does appreciate the 1990s, I will humbly submit that the decade had some hidden dangers. If it is true that one's formative adult years are their twenties, then the 1990s stunted the intellectual growth of a LOT of GenX folks. Not to get too political, but how else does one explain GenXers like Ted Cruz, Cory Booker, Beto O'Rourke, Marco Rubio, Scott Walker, and Kamala Harris (at least her presidential run) ALL falling flat on their faces when running for President in 2016 and 2020?

But if we are going to get heavily into favorite decades, I think one can make the case that the upcoming 2020s would be an excellent decade in spite of the awful start. Remember that in 2026, the US has both its 250th birthday and is hosting the FIFA World Cup at the same time. Also, the summer Olympics are coming back to Los Angeles in 2028.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: ozarkman417 on August 27, 2020, 11:36:45 PM
I technically have three options:

2000s- Too young to remember or appreciate most of it. 2008 is the first presidential election I remember. I remember the financial crash very well, because my father had a real estate investment that collapsed.

2010s- The only decade that I have fully lived in so far, so of course it's my favorite. Traveled to over 20 states and four countries. Survived middle school, and had fun times with the people I met there, whether it was in person or playing video games.  Watched the total solar eclipse, and Finished it off with starting to drive.

2020s- Now I can't even go to school. Travels have been regionally limited. The virtual school setup is incredibly dysfunctional at the current moment. Social media is one giant political circlejerk at this point. I was going to get a job for the first time, until the pandemic struck. bring up solar eclipses, there will be another one in 2024. Please just let me finish my childhood off right!
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Max Rockatansky on August 27, 2020, 11:54:39 PM
80s descending to a far distant 1990s. 
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Rothman on August 28, 2020, 12:00:36 AM
This has been a tough one for me.  I don't like the romanticization of decades of our youth.  Too often, kids are unaware of horrible things that are happening around them.  So...

1970s:  When my world was tiny and all I cared about was playing with my friends learning how to ride my bike...didn't have much of a feel for what was going on in the world.

1980s:  Growing up a bit, had lots of fun with friends, but still a lot of ignorance.

1990s:  More maturing, high school, college, marriage.  Internet comes into the mainstream.  Last real innovations in modern music :D (eh, except for dubstep :D).  Sort of a roller coaster between highs and lows, but not really the happiest time for me, despite learning a lot.

2000s: 9-11 has cast a very large shadow over the subsequent decades, mainly due to the federal government overreaches in the name of "national security."  Tougher financial times for me.

2010s:  A candidate.  Found financial stability and finally think I settled into life.  Lots of travel.  My kids are now maturing.

2020s:  Worst decade ever.

So, I suppose I'll go with the 2010s.  1980s and 1990s follow in suit.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: corco on August 28, 2020, 01:08:32 AM
1) 1990s - I'm one to romanticize childhood. I was generally most content during these times, had a happy childhood, never too stressed. I miss family roadtrips from Illinois to Ohio, playing outside in what was sort of a classical suburban neighborhood, and the general feeling of optimism. Between childhood naivete and a stable country/world, it was tough not to feel like the world was a great and magical place.

2) 2020s - ...so, small sample size obviously, and there are obviously world events that could cause all this to go downhill in a hurry, but I feel like I personally am in a better position than before. I get to work at home and have an employer that is probably going to allow that to continue indefinitely, which has been great for my mental health, I feel pretty professionally satisfied, and I'm starting to be comfortable in my own skin, and that's important. There's also...the events of this year have made me a lot more nihilistic, but I don't actually think that's a bad thing. Any sense of real hope or optimism is gone and replaced with a desire to just keep my head down and enjoy whatever small moments I can find, and there's some beauty in that.

3) 1980s- I left the 80s as a 1.5 year old so I have no memory of them. I consider that to be a perfectly average period of life experience.

4) 2010s - This is a really tough decade to evaluate because I feel like 2000s me would have judged it as a failure, and 2020s me sees a lot of missed opportunities, but on the whole things turned out pretty okay and I transitioned from immature college kid to having a reasonably comfortable and stable adult life, which I guess is all you can really ask for out of your 20s. I struggled to find love in this period, but there were signs of hope in the later part of the decade, and I probably could have done more with my life if I wanted to.

5) 2000s- Talk about a roller coaster. I had my highest highs and my lowest lows over this decade, but on the whole I'd say I came out of it worse than I entered it. I think the country saw a lot of that too - some very high highs and some very low lows. What a time to be alive.


Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Ben114 on August 28, 2020, 01:41:52 AM
2000s - I was born post-9/11, so I don't really know the effect of the heightened security. My passion for transportation (roads included) started in 2009.

2010s - Currently my favorite of the three decades. My personality shaped throughout this decade. I went from elementary school all the way to high school over the years, and understood the world as I got older.

2020s - No.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on August 28, 2020, 01:07:09 PM
1990s:  ... Last real innovations in modern music

I was trying to figure out how to word that.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Duke87 on August 28, 2020, 02:02:53 PM
I miss the America of my childhood.

I think a lot of people do right now. It's hard not to, in 2020.

I think this is a thing in any year, since it's a consequence of basic psychology.

Everyone naturally adapts to the world as it exists in their formative years, which are primarily the childhood and teenage years but to some extent also includes a person's early 20s. After that, people become generally set in their ways, but the modern world changes fast enough that it will change a lot over the remainder of a person's life. The inevitable result is that as people progress through adulthood, they feel increasingly out of place in the world around them. So everyone misses what things were like when they were young, not because things were better, but because things were more familiar and more within their comfort zones.

Basically, evolution didn't prepare us to live in a rapidly changing world. And indeed, for most of human history, we really didn't. But ever since the industrial revolution got going, we have, and there's no stopping it now. Maybe eventually we'll adapt to it. Or maybe eventually we'll reach a point where the advancement of science and technology reaches saturation and the rate of change will naturally slow down.


Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Scott5114 on August 28, 2020, 02:28:30 PM
If it is true that one's formative adult years are their twenties, then the 1990s stunted the intellectual growth of a LOT of GenX folks. Not to get too political, but how else does one explain GenXers like Ted Cruz, Cory Booker, Beto O'Rourke, Marco Rubio, Scott Walker, and Kamala Harris (at least her presidential run) ALL falling flat on their faces when running for President in 2016 and 2020?

I think this has more to do with the fact that Gen X has the misfortune of being the generation directly after the Baby Boomer generation, who, due mostly to the 2009 financial crisis, has been unable or unwilling to just retire already. You saw the same thing at the job I worked at before—Gen Xers and millennials wanting to move up to more attractive positions but unable to do so because they were already occupied by people in their 70s who wouldn't retire because they couldn't afford it, or they liked having the insurance. The current Presidential election features the oldest president in US history running against the person who would be the oldest president ever elected, and his main primary opponent was just as old. The Gen Xers can't step up if the Baby Boomers aren't willing to hand over the keys.

Cruz, Booker, O'Rourke, Rubio, Walker, and Harris all had fatal flaws in their candidacies, and negative circumstances beyond their control (a lot of them were a victim of a candidate that had a similar message but got known for it first or executed it better), that had more to do with them losing than being Gen X, but a discussion of that is beyond the forum's remit.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: hbelkins on August 28, 2020, 06:57:11 PM
three very brutal winters in a row (1977, '78, and '79)

You must have lived somewhere else than Kentucky at that point?

Nope. Lived right where I am living now. 1979 would have been a worse-than-average winter in its own right, but the two winters before were extremely atypical for Kentucky. Lots of snow and bitter cold. Those first two winters, we got out of school for Christmas break in December and went back to school the first week of March. In 1979, my senior year of high school, we got a few days in here and there during January and February before the next big snowfall came.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: bandit957 on August 28, 2020, 07:03:04 PM
I was in kindergarten in the late '70s when Kentucky had some really bad winters. But I also remember some terrible winters in the '90s when I was in college. I remember a horrible, horrible winter in 1993-94. NKU actually called off school for a week in early 1994 and said it was the first time they ever canceled.

The winter of 1992-93 was bad, but that was further south too. I remember some college pals were talking about how they were going to Florida for spring break, but Florida had huge blizzards when they were there - in March, no less! Ruined their vacation utterly!
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: mgk920 on August 29, 2020, 02:28:10 PM
Even though it was a really crappy time for me on a personal level and what I learned of what was going on in the world was via radio, TV or the racks of out of town magazines and newspapers at the local pvblic and university libraries (ie, *no* internet), give me back the 1980s!

Mike
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: thspfc on August 29, 2020, 03:05:29 PM
three very brutal winters in a row (1977, '78, and '79)

You must have lived somewhere else than Kentucky at that point?

Nope. Lived right where I am living now. 1979 would have been a worse-than-average winter in its own right, but the two winters before were extremely atypical for Kentucky. Lots of snow and bitter cold. Those first two winters, we got out of school for Christmas break in December and went back to school the first week of March. In 1979, my senior year of high school, we got a few days in here and there during January and February before the next big snowfall came.
Was it really that much worse so as to make you judge the year as a whole on the winter? I suppose you might think of winter differently in Kentucky than we do further north (here, winter is just something that happens, some years it's worse than others, but it is what it is).
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on August 31, 2020, 10:37:23 PM
three very brutal winters in a row (1977, '78, and '79)

You must have lived somewhere else than Kentucky at that point?

Nope. Lived right where I am living now. 1979 would have been a worse-than-average winter in its own right, but the two winters before were extremely atypical for Kentucky. Lots of snow and bitter cold. Those first two winters, we got out of school for Christmas break in December and went back to school the first week of March. In 1979, my senior year of high school, we got a few days in here and there during January and February before the next big snowfall came.
Was it really that much worse so as to make you judge the year as a whole on the winter? I suppose you might think of winter differently in Kentucky than we do further north (here, winter is just something that happens, some years it's worse than others, but it is what it is).

That's kind of what I was thinking as well. A winter would have to be pretty crazy for me to remember the year by it, and even then, it would probably be more like a specific storm than the whole winter.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on August 31, 2020, 10:38:15 PM
Interestingly, it seems like there's a pretty wide consensus that 2010's > 2000's. Does anyone disagree?
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 01, 2020, 09:54:38 AM
Interestingly, it seems like there's a pretty wide consensus that 2010's > 2000's. Does anyone disagree?

Yep.

I've been alive for four decades, and I look back at them with progressively less fondness.  That is to say, each decade has been worse than the one before it.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Revive 755 on September 01, 2020, 10:25:32 PM
But if we are going to get heavily into favorite decades, I think one can make the case that the upcoming 2020s would be an excellent decade in spite of the awful start. Remember that in 2026, the US has both its 250th birthday and is hosting the FIFA World Cup at the same time. Also, the summer Olympics are coming back to Los Angeles in 2028.

Depends how much fallout there is from 2020.  If things turn around in 2021, maybe.  If 2021 continues like 2020, or manages to go even worse . . .

Certainly would be interesting to revisit this in December 2029 and see.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 02, 2020, 09:08:04 AM

But if we are going to get heavily into favorite decades, I think one can make the case that the upcoming 2020s would be an excellent decade in spite of the awful start. Remember that in 2026, the US has both its 250th birthday and is hosting the FIFA World Cup at the same time. Also, the summer Olympics are coming back to Los Angeles in 2028.

Depends how much fallout there is from 2020.  If things turn around in 2021, maybe.  If 2021 continues like 2020, or manages to go even worse . . .

Certainly would be interesting to revisit this in December 2029 and see.

I have a feeling things will have all shaken out much earlier than 2029.
Would be interesting to revisit this in 2025, say.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: thspfc on September 02, 2020, 06:23:53 PM

But if we are going to get heavily into favorite decades, I think one can make the case that the upcoming 2020s would be an excellent decade in spite of the awful start. Remember that in 2026, the US has both its 250th birthday and is hosting the FIFA World Cup at the same time. Also, the summer Olympics are coming back to Los Angeles in 2028.

Depends how much fallout there is from 2020.  If things turn around in 2021, maybe.  If 2021 continues like 2020, or manages to go even worse . . .

Certainly would be interesting to revisit this in December 2029 and see.

I have a feeling things will have all shaken out much earlier than 2029.
Would be interesting to revisit this in 2025, say.
The US will return to normal, rest assured. By no means am I an expert, but I believe COVID will almost certainly be done within the next calendar year.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: 1 on September 02, 2020, 06:27:52 PM

But if we are going to get heavily into favorite decades, I think one can make the case that the upcoming 2020s would be an excellent decade in spite of the awful start. Remember that in 2026, the US has both its 250th birthday and is hosting the FIFA World Cup at the same time. Also, the summer Olympics are coming back to Los Angeles in 2028.

Depends how much fallout there is from 2020.  If things turn around in 2021, maybe.  If 2021 continues like 2020, or manages to go even worse . . .

Certainly would be interesting to revisit this in December 2029 and see.

I have a feeling things will have all shaken out much earlier than 2029.
Would be interesting to revisit this in 2025, say.
The US will return to normal, rest assured. By no means am I an expert, but I believe COVID will almost certainly be done within the next calendar year.

Even if it does, it might still define the decade. Many things in the 1960s in the US happened in two consecutive years: 1968 and 1969. The early (wartime) 1860s and 1940s are more important than the late (peacetime) 1860s and 1940s.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: thspfc on September 02, 2020, 06:32:29 PM

But if we are going to get heavily into favorite decades, I think one can make the case that the upcoming 2020s would be an excellent decade in spite of the awful start. Remember that in 2026, the US has both its 250th birthday and is hosting the FIFA World Cup at the same time. Also, the summer Olympics are coming back to Los Angeles in 2028.

Depends how much fallout there is from 2020.  If things turn around in 2021, maybe.  If 2021 continues like 2020, or manages to go even worse . . .

Certainly would be interesting to revisit this in December 2029 and see.

I have a feeling things will have all shaken out much earlier than 2029.
Would be interesting to revisit this in 2025, say.
The US will return to normal, rest assured. By no means am I an expert, but I believe COVID will almost certainly be done within the next calendar year.

Even if it does, it might still define the decade. Many things in the 1960s in the US happened in two consecutive years: 1968 and 1969. The early (wartime) 1860s and 1940s are more important than the late (peacetime) 1860s and 1940s.
Unless the mortality rate of COVID magically jumps 5-10 percent, I don't see it being veiwed anywhere close to the Civil War and WWII. That's not to downplay the devastating effects of COVID, but it's just not the same thing at all. I think COVID is more comparable to 9/11 in terms of the panic it has caused throughout the nation, even though 9/11 was much less deadly.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on September 02, 2020, 08:58:59 PM
The US will return to normal, rest assured. By no means am I an expert, but I believe COVID will almost certainly be done within the next calendar year.
Even if it does, it might still define the decade.

I agree. I'd even say it's likely to define the decade.

There's already been some shifts that are likely here to stay:
-More mask-wearing in public
-More staying home when you're sick
-More working from home

Unless the mortality rate of COVID magically jumps 5-10 percent, I don't see it being veiwed anywhere close to the Civil War and WWII. That's not to downplay the devastating effects of COVID, but it's just not the same thing at all. I think COVID is more comparable to 9/11 in terms of the panic it has caused throughout the nation, even though 9/11 was much less deadly.

I dunno about that. I think this pandemic certainly has had a way bigger effect on our day-to-day lives than 9/11. Comparing it to the wars is a bit trickier. The long-term effects will be very different than those of a war, but they could still be just as numerous and important, if not more so.

Let's put it this way: no one can escape the pandemic. It's penetrating, on a global level, in a way that conflicts, natural disasters, etc. just... aren't.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kevinb1994 on September 02, 2020, 09:03:43 PM
The US will return to normal, rest assured. By no means am I an expert, but I believe COVID will almost certainly be done within the next calendar year.
Even if it does, it might still define the decade.

I agree. I'd even say it's likely to define the decade.

There's already been some shifts that are likely here to stay:
-More mask-wearing in public
-More staying home when you're sick
-More working from home

Unless the mortality rate of COVID magically jumps 5-10 percent, I don't see it being veiwed anywhere close to the Civil War and WWII. That's not to downplay the devastating effects of COVID, but it's just not the same thing at all. I think COVID is more comparable to 9/11 in terms of the panic it has caused throughout the nation, even though 9/11 was much less deadly.

I dunno about that. I think this pandemic certainly has had a way bigger effect on our day-to-day lives than 9/11. Comparing it to the wars is a bit trickier. The long-term effects will be very different than those of a war, but they could still be just as numerous and important, if not more so.

Let's put it this way: no one can escape the pandemic. It's penetrating, on a global level, in a way that conflicts, natural disasters, etc. just... aren't.
You’d have to wait at least 25 years to be able to look back properly.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 09:17:03 AM
I'd even say it's likely to define the decade.

We'll have no idea what defines the decade until the decade is over.  There might be something that happens in 2027 that totally steals the show, and that will be what everyone remembers about the 2020s.

There's already been some shifts that are likely here to stay:
-More mask-wearing in public
-More staying home when you're sick
-More working from home

Probably the last of those three will persist the longest.

I have a feeling the "stay home if you have any symptoms" thing will fade more quickly, as employees start running out of PTO and employers start getting tired of finding people to cover shifts due to runny noses and coughs.

As for masks, remember that a large part of the country is still vocally opposed to them.  Maybe that will stick around in some areas, but I highly suspect mask use will drop off precipitously once they're no longer government-recommended.

I think this pandemic certainly has had a way bigger effect on our day-to-day lives than 9/11. Comparing it to the wars is a bit trickier. The long-term effects will be very different than those of a war, but they could still be just as numerous and important, if not more so.

Let's put it this way: no one can escape the pandemic. It's penetrating, on a global level, in a way that conflicts, natural disasters, etc. just... aren't.

Do you remember 9/11?  You were a baby at the time, right?  The event didn't have a huge long-lasting effect on our day-to-day physical activities, but it certainly changed the way we view international politics, Muslims, air travel, war, etc.  Most of those shifts can't be seen with the eye, but they happened nonetheless.  I think that, after this outbreak dies down, the changes that we've undergone will end up being less long-lasting and less fundamental than those effected by 9/11.

In my estimation, 2001-2002 was a huge paradigm shift for America.  The 1990s were a different America than the 2000s.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: bandit957 on September 03, 2020, 10:30:11 AM
I always thought the late '90s were different from the early '90s, because of the influence of the Internet (which was often negative). I wasn't born yet in the 1960s, but I also think of the early '60s as being different from the late '60s, maybe because the late '60s were much more hippie-like.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 10:38:25 AM
I always thought the late '90s were different from the early '90s, because of the influence of the Internet (which was often negative). I wasn't born yet in the 1960s, but I also think of the early '60s as being different from the late '60s, maybe because the late '60s were much more hippie-like.

The internet was still kind of "new" feeling in the late 1990s.  It hadn't become ingrained yet, the way it is now.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: SEWIGuy on September 03, 2020, 11:05:24 AM
I got my first email address in 1994.  So yeah...
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 11:11:33 AM
Heck, I enrolled in college in 1999, and the only internet access was in the computer lab.  I'm pretty sure my parents were still using dial-up and counting how many hours they used each day—although that might have recently changed before 1999.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on September 03, 2020, 11:11:51 AM
I'd even say it's likely to define the decade.
We'll have no idea what defines the decade until the decade is over.  There might be something that happens in 2027 that totally steals the show, and that will be what everyone remembers about the 2020s.

Yeah, I wouldn't rule out that possibility. I guess when I say "likely", I mean based on what we know now, it seems like there's a greater than 50% chance that this will define the decade. Obviously, that's still far from a 100% guarantee, as anything can, and probably will, happen before 2030.

As for masks, remember that a large part of the country is still vocally opposed to them.  Maybe that will stick around in some areas, but I highly suspect mask use will drop off precipitously once they're no longer government-recommended.

Yes, I fully expect mask wearing to drop off once there's a vaccine, but it's "here to stay" in the sense that mask wearing will never, at any point in the future, seem as crazy as it did prior to March 2020.


Do you remember 9/11?  You were a baby at the time, right?  The event didn't have a huge long-lasting effect on our day-to-day physical activities, but it certainly changed the way we view international politics, Muslims, air travel, war, etc.  Most of those shifts can't be seen with the eye, but they happened nonetheless.

I don't remember 9/11. My earliest memories date back to the '02-'03 time period.

I guess I tend to place more weight on shifts that actually affect your day to day life, because that's what you're going to remember.
Everyone that was old enough remembers the moment of 9/11. It was a huge, unprecedented game changer that caught America by surprise. But, what was actually different in the average person's life in September 2002 than September 2001? Probably not a whole lot, unless you're someone that does a lot of air travel. Sure, attitudes were shifting, but the economy hummed along, work and school hummed along, and actual life didn't change that much.

On the other hand, what's the difference in the average person's life in March-April 2019, vs March-April 2020? Or even September 2019 vs September 2020? There are a lot more tangible differences to point to. Little kids, for example, are going remember this pandemic in a way that they wouldn't remember 9/11.

It's just different because you don't have that "moment" to point to, where everyone remembers exactly where they were and what they were doing. For me, with regards to the pandemic, there's a few moments I can point to... the night sports were cancelled... the day church services switched to online... the panic when grocery store shelves were bare... and a few other more personal ones that I won't get into... none of which compare to the shock of 9/11, but collectively add up to something much more profound, IMO.


I think that, after this outbreak dies down, the changes that we've undergone will end up being less long-lasting and less fundamental than those effected by 9/11.

I was going to say we can agree to disagree, but perhaps we can agree that it's simply too early to know for sure.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 11:25:18 AM
Everyone that was old enough remembers the moment of 9/11. It was a huge, unprecedented game changer that caught America by surprise. But, what was actually different in the average person's life in September 2002 than September 2001? Probably not a whole lot, unless you're someone that does a lot of air travel.

Ask any American of Middle Eastern heritage, and I bet you'll get a different answer.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: SEWIGuy on September 03, 2020, 11:37:30 AM
I remember when people were describing email to me back in about 1993, and it astounded me. 
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 11:43:17 AM
When I first started seeing websites advertised on TV commercials, I thought it was ridiculous.

Why would anybody prefer to shop from their computer instead of actually going to the store? I thought.

What possible purpose could anyone have in visiting a restaurant's website? I thought.

My prediction:  This will never catch on.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: bandit957 on September 03, 2020, 11:46:59 AM
I didn't think DVD's would ever catch on.

Did CD's ever fully catch on? I kind of skipped from vinyl to YouTube.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kevinb1994 on September 03, 2020, 11:48:10 AM
I didn't think DVD's would ever catch on.

Did CD's ever fully catch on? I kind of skipped from vinyl to YouTube.
Yes, well, at least for some time, it did.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: 1 on September 03, 2020, 11:48:22 AM
Did CD's ever fully catch on? I kind of skipped from vinyl to YouTube.

I have a week (=168 hours) of music on my computer. Almost all of it is from CDs.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 11:54:03 AM
CDs were king when I was at that age.  Now so many have either been lost or scratched that I don't think they were the best medium.  I have mix tapes that lasted longer than the CDs I used to make them.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: bandit957 on September 03, 2020, 11:55:08 AM
I have records I got 40 years ago that are almost like new. I don't think a CD will last that long.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: 1 on September 03, 2020, 12:14:28 PM
The lifetime of a music CD is longer than the time between the first CD (1982) and now. They only stop functioning if they are damaged or not kept properly.

I recently added some CDs to my computer that were labeled as being from West Germany. No problems at all. One of the CD cases from 1986 told you how to take care of your CD. However, I have to use an external disc drive — my laptop doesn't come with a CD drive.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 12:18:46 PM
My wife and I still listen to CDs on road trips.  Our present car has a six-disc changer.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Scott5114 on September 03, 2020, 12:53:32 PM
I have a feeling the "stay home if you have any symptoms" thing will fade more quickly, as employees start running out of PTO and employers start getting tired of finding people to cover shifts due to runny noses and coughs.

As for masks, remember that a large part of the country is still vocally opposed to them.  Maybe that will stick around in some areas, but I highly suspect mask use will drop off precipitously once they're no longer government-recommended.

My hope is that the two of these will combine to make a societal expectation that if you're feeling sick with a cold or a flu, that you wear a mask to protect others in your social circle from catching it. But as you said, we can't even get people to wear them to protect from a potentially deadly disease, so that's probably just a fantasy.

On the other hand, as an executive at my company, I can tell people who show up to work sick that they have to go home if they won't wear a mask. So at least my company won't be getting everyone sick.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 01:39:11 PM

I have a feeling the "stay home if you have any symptoms" thing will fade more quickly, as employees start running out of PTO and employers start getting tired of finding people to cover shifts due to runny noses and coughs.

As for masks, remember that a large part of the country is still vocally opposed to them.  Maybe that will stick around in some areas, but I highly suspect mask use will drop off precipitously once they're no longer government-recommended.

My hope is that the two of these will combine to make a societal expectation that if you're feeling sick with a cold or a flu, that you wear a mask to protect others in your social circle from catching it. But as you said, we can't even get people to wear them to protect from a potentially deadly disease, so that's probably just a fantasy.

On the other hand, as an executive at my company, I can tell people who show up to work sick that they have to go home if they won't wear a mask. So at least my company won't be getting everyone sick.

I'm not sure...  I imagine it's more likely that people with the sniffles will pretend they aren't sick at all, rather than wear a mask and risk their boss sending them home.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: SEWIGuy on September 03, 2020, 01:48:48 PM
I hope we get more people who say "I don't feel great, but I am well enough to work from home." 
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 03, 2020, 02:11:30 PM
I hope we get more people who say "I don't feel great, but I am well enough to work from home." 

Probably.  That scenario wouldn't work in my case, but I'm sure it would for plenty of others.  In my case, I had to have my whole computer and desk papers dropped off on my front porch when we were home-quarantined.  There are a few people who have a computer at home that can be used for work, but not everyone gets that advantage.  There are security systems, VPN logins, etc to worry about.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: hbelkins on September 03, 2020, 05:49:46 PM

On the other hand, as an executive at my company, I can tell people who show up to work sick that they have to go home if they won't wear a mask. So at least my company won't be getting everyone sick.

But, will you put that policy in writing in a company handbook so employees will know what the expectations are? And will you require them to take a paid day off, or give them an extra sick day, if they don't want to burn a sick day because they have a cold?

I certainly wouldn't want to burn a sick day if I just had the sniffles, or otherwise felt good enough to work. I've gone to work with a cold plenty of times during my life, and try to miss only if I truly don't feel like it.

And as soon as the mask requirements at work, or the governmental orders for general use, are dropped, I'll no longer be wearing one. I won't pass judgment on anyone who continues to do so when not required.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: Takumi on September 03, 2020, 08:58:33 PM
-I still buy CDs whenever possible. Not that it’s possible that often anymore.

-I remember being about 9 years old and saying “the internet is overrated”. Probably the most wrong about something I’ve ever been.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 04, 2020, 10:47:09 AM

On the other hand, as an executive at my company, I can tell people who show up to work sick that they have to go home if they won't wear a mask. So at least my company won't be getting everyone sick.

But, will you put that policy in writing in a company handbook so employees will know what the expectations are? And will you require them to take a paid day off, or give them an extra sick day, if they don't want to burn a sick day because they have a cold?

I certainly wouldn't want to burn a sick day if I just had the sniffles, or otherwise felt good enough to work. I've gone to work with a cold plenty of times during my life, and try to miss only if I truly don't feel like it.

Who said he would force you to stay home?  He said that would only happen if you refused to wear a mask.  Problem easily solved.

As for company expectations being in a handbook...  Would they have to be?  Could it not simply be a memo sent out to existing employees, or communicated verbally?  I've worked for companies that didn't even give me employee handbook.  Somehow people still knew what was expected.

And as soon as the mask requirements at work, or the governmental orders for general use, are dropped, I'll no longer be wearing one. I won't pass judgment on anyone who continues to do so when not required.

Which is a perfectly respectable position.  I'll probably do the same, although I might continue their use in situations that I consider to be especially high-risk.  But I know plenty of people who have or are related to someone who has a compromised immune system—both at work and at church—to make me not begrudge anyone their choice to either (a) continue wearing masks after I think they're no longer advantageous or else (b) request me to do so when I'm around them.



-I remember being about 9 years old and saying “the internet is overrated”. Probably the most wrong about something I’ve ever been.

Not only did I predict the Internet wouldn't catch on but, when my class play-picked stocks to "invest" in during high school, the only one of my choices that made money was the one I picked at random.

For these reasons, I'll never choose my own stocks.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: hbelkins on September 04, 2020, 11:45:43 AM
As for company expectations being in a handbook...  Would they have to be?  Could it not simply be a memo sent out to existing employees, or communicated verbally?  I've worked for companies that didn't even give me employee handbook.  Somehow people still knew what was expected.

While I said "company handbook," perhaps "in writing" would be a better term. Of course, things are often different in a big operation as opposed to a small one.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: hbelkins on September 04, 2020, 11:48:39 AM
-I still buy CDs whenever possible. Not that it’s possible that often anymore.

Same here, if there's any new music worth buying. There really isn't. I can't remember the last CD I bought.

But when I do, I always burn a copy of the audio disc, and then rip it to MP3.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: MikieTimT on September 04, 2020, 02:30:38 PM
Interestingly, it seems like there's a pretty wide consensus that 2010's > 2000's. Does anyone disagree?

Semi-retired, drove a camper all over the western US, got married, had 3 kids, and started 2 businesses in the 2000's, so I'd have to disagree.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: JoePCool14 on September 04, 2020, 03:03:25 PM
I've only been alive since the tail end of 2000, so I'll only give my thoughts since the 2000s decade.

2000s: Childhood (of course). I had a pretty good childhood, growing up as an only child in a stable home in a prosperous, safe location. I had lots of different friends, most I no longer even know, but at the time, I was pretty happy. How could I not be with those conditions?

2010s: A decade of massive change. When it began, I was still a child. When it ended, I was in the middle of my first serious relationship. And a whole hell of a lot happened in between. I discovered Minecraft at the end of 2012. :nod: High school from 2014-2018 was full of ups-and-downs, but generally enjoyable. I got my first job in March of 2017. I became extremely politically active watching the run-up to the 2016 election, but I first became really politically aware when the Ferguson riots occurred in November of 2014. Nearing the end of the decade though, things got more tense for me in many ways. And in the waning hours of the decade, I saw the stories coming out of China about this "novel coronavirus". I thought nothing of it, and moved on... Overall, I will look back on this decade fondly, but there were plenty of blemishes.

2020s: Obviously, this year has been pretty terrible on a global scale, but it's been pretty terrible for me personally too. My original relationship of over 2.5 years ended very poorly, and that scarred me for a couple months. We had some extended family trouble that affected us. Personal concerns over the riots. Personal concerns over the looming election. And worrying about going away to university where I am now. It's been bad, with some good moments sprinkled in.

The future?:
We're in for a rough rest of the decade. The political scene is about ready to collapse, and take the U.S. down with it. The question is how fast could this be resolved. One thing is for sure: our current political paradigm is NOT sustainable for much longer. And China is ready and waiting to swoop in for the kill. I just hope I can get through college, find a new girl and start a family. But I'm not sure what's going to happen.

It's unsettling. Needless to say, I wish it was the early 2010s again.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: kphoger on September 04, 2020, 03:25:11 PM
The political scene is about ready to collapse, and take the U.S. down with it. The question is how fast could this be resolved. One thing is for sure: our current political paradigm is NOT sustainable for much longer.

meh.

While the deep political divide and increasing vitriol on both sides of the aisle certainly frustrate and annoy me, I wouldn't say it's going to be our nation's demise.  No matter what you think of whomever holds the office of President, you can always wait four or eight years, and then someone else will hold it.

It does seem like both parties have lost the ability to find the center and work with a bipartisan mindset.  For all the flak Bill Clinton got from Republicans, he could work with Republicans, and the Democratic party has swung very far to the left since he was in office.  Joe Biden appeared to be more to the center than a lot of the other contenders, but he seems to be sliding further and further left as time goes on.  Donald Trump has obviously dug the Republican party's heel in pretty far to the right and doesn't play nicely with those on the left side, and none of his base seems to want that to change.  Gone, it seems to me, are the political parties of thirty years ago.

But the country goes on.  If it weren't for the virus, we'd all be griping about the normal political stuff like Russia, e-mails, campaign financing, abortion bills, yadda yadda yadda.  You know, the same mud that gets flung and the same arguments that get hashed with every President that half the country doesn't like and the other half loves.

It'll all work out.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: JoePCool14 on September 04, 2020, 05:27:24 PM
The political scene is about ready to collapse, and take the U.S. down with it. The question is how fast could this be resolved. One thing is for sure: our current political paradigm is NOT sustainable for much longer.

meh.

While the deep political divide and increasing vitriol on both sides of the aisle certainly frustrate and annoy me, I wouldn't say it's going to be our nation's demise.  No matter what you think of whomever holds the office of President, you can always wait four or eight years, and then someone else will hold it.

It does seem like both parties have lost the ability to find the center and work with a bipartisan mindset.  For all the flak Bill Clinton got from Republicans, he could work with Republicans, and the Democratic party has swung very far to the left since he was in office.  Joe Biden appeared to be more to the center than a lot of the other contenders, but he seems to be sliding further and further left as time goes on.  Donald Trump has obviously dug the Republican party's heel in pretty far to the right and doesn't play nicely with those on the left side, and none of his base seems to want that to change.  Gone, it seems to me, are the political parties of thirty years ago.

But the country goes on.  If it weren't for the virus, we'd all be griping about the normal political stuff like Russia, e-mails, campaign financing, abortion bills, yadda yadda yadda.  You know, the same mud that gets flung and the same arguments that get hashed with every President that half the country doesn't like and the other half loves.

It'll all work out.

I sure hope so. Since I'm only 19, I will say I lack the perspective of someone who's lived for several decades and seen a lot more.

I guess my outlook is to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. In the meantime, I'm just gonna focus on college and usual college things.
Title: Re: Favorite decades
Post by: webny99 on September 05, 2020, 09:55:17 PM
The political scene is about ready to collapse, and take the U.S. down with it. The question is how fast could this be resolved. One thing is for sure: our current political paradigm is NOT sustainable for much longer.
meh.
While the deep political divide and increasing vitriol on both sides of the aisle certainly frustrate and annoy me, I wouldn't say it's going to be our nation's demise.

OK, treading carefully here, I actually agree with JoePCool on this one. It isn't sustainable forever. I think the demise of this country is far more likely to be from within than without. All signs have been pointing in that direction for a while, and more so now than ever.