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Concrete lanes

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froggie:

--- Quote from: RobbieL2415 on August 06, 2021, 09:25:53 AM ---Concrete surfaces are prone to frost heaves.

Just ask I-495 from Westborough to Foxboro.

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Not if the concrete is built and maintained correctly.

Just ask the Upper Midwest (Minnesota and Iowa specifically)...

Crown Victoria:

--- Quote from: Roadsguy on August 04, 2021, 06:30:06 PM ---
--- Quote from: storm2k on August 04, 2021, 12:05:28 AM ---
--- Quote from: MASTERNC on August 03, 2021, 01:10:32 PM ---PA is actually adding concrete sections in the Philly area when doing major highway reconstruction (I-476, US 202, US 422, I-95).  The strange one is the section on the PA Turnpike in the middle of nowhere west of Carlisle.

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PennDOT loves them some concrete roadways in a lot of places. PTC looks like they're favoring asphalt surfaces these days tho.

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PennDOT seems to generally use concrete on new construction and full-depth reconstructions in rural areas, but in urban and suburban areas, they seem to almost arbitrarily choose which to use. In the Philadelphia area, you have reconstructed sections of I-95, US 202, US 422, and I-476 done in concrete, while PA 309, most of the Blue Route when constructed, and possibly US 1 and I-295 in Bucks County were done/are being done in asphalt. Over in Harrisburg, I-81 was reconstructed with concrete, and both the older reconstructed and newer sections of PA 581 are concrete, while the I-83 widening (at least Section 1 north of the Eisenhower Interchange) is being done with asphalt.

Meanwhile the PTC uses concrete on the Pittsburgh area toll roads and reconstructed ramps on the mainline/NE Extension, while the mainline/NE Extension themselves are asphalt (with the notable exception of this one four-mile stretch west of Carlisle which was reconstructed with concrete for some reason.

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Adding a surface road example...PennDOT chose concrete for the reconstruction of PA 61 through Deer Lake a few years back (with a very short stretch northbound done with asphalt), while the current project at the I-78 interchange near Hamburg is using asphalt for PA 61's lanes and concrete for the ramps to/from I-78.

Back on the interstates...the current reconstruction of I-78 between Lenhartsville and the Lehigh County line is being done in concrete...except for the immediate area of the PA 737 interchange, which was done in asphalt.

Chris19001:
PA 63 through Kulpsville was reconstructed about 10 years back with concrete.  It’s a very heavy stretch seeing lots of trucks from the PA Turnpike…

US 89:

--- Quote from: Roadsguy on August 04, 2021, 06:30:06 PM ---PennDOT seems to generally use concrete on new construction and full-depth reconstructions in rural areas, but in urban and suburban areas, they seem to almost arbitrarily choose which to use.

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This is fascinating to me because UDOT is almost the exact opposite. Almost all of Utah’s rural freeway mileage is asphalt, and almost all the rural concrete sections I can think of are original pavement that has never been replaced. On the other hand, the majority of urban freeways and expressways are paved in concrete, whether it’s original or recent. I think most urban asphalt sections were done that way in order to cut down on highway noise.

As for surface roads, they are mostly asphalt but some concrete arterials do exist here and there in urban areas, mostly as a result of recent reconstruction. I cannot think of a single concrete surface road in a rural area in Utah.

DJStephens:

--- Quote from: deathtopumpkins on July 29, 2021, 09:24:05 AM ---There are also a few random streets around Brookline and Newton that are concrete, including part of MA 16: https://goo.gl/maps/EmeAJsdxSS6UVmyJA

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That is in front of Warren Jr. High School.  Now "Warren House", apparently some kind of repurpose to housing.  Several of Newtons' main streets were indeed concrete, to include Washington, Watertown, Centre, Lowell Ave, among a few others.  Amazing that they still exist, albeit in pockmarked form.   

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