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Concrete lanes

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Breadman17:

--- Quote from: Mergingtraffic on July 27, 2021, 04:06:17 PM ---Funny, that with the change of the seasons there aren't that many places in new England with concrete lanes. 
CT has only 4 spots left. 

--- End quote ---
Makes me think that you’re saying that they’re disappearing? PennDOT and the PTC love concrete lanes. The new section of the PA-576 turnpike that’s about to open is paved entirely with concrete

abqtraveler:

--- Quote from: Breadman17 on August 30, 2021, 08:29:42 AM ---
--- Quote from: Mergingtraffic on July 27, 2021, 04:06:17 PM ---Funny, that with the change of the seasons there aren't that many places in new England with concrete lanes. 
CT has only 4 spots left. 

--- End quote ---
Makes me think that you’re saying that they’re disappearing? PennDOT loves concrete lanes. The new section of the PA-576 turnpike that’s about to open is paved entirely with concrete

--- End quote ---
I recall during the 1980s, most of Connecticut's freeways were concrete. Nearly all of them were paved over with asphalt during the 1990s, save for the few remaining concrete sections that still exist today.

DJ Particle:

--- Quote from: froggie on August 06, 2021, 09:57:59 AM ---
--- Quote from: RobbieL2415 on August 06, 2021, 09:25:53 AM ---Concrete surfaces are prone to frost heaves.

Just ask I-495 from Westborough to Foxboro.

--- End quote ---

Not if the concrete is built and maintained correctly.

Just ask the Upper Midwest (Minnesota and Iowa specifically)...

--- End quote ---
When I first moved to MN, portions of MN-77 and MN-62 near the airport were very "ba-bump, ba-bump, ba-bump" until they fixed it around 2004 or so.

shadyjay:
This seems fitting for here.... this advertisement is on EBAY and says 60 miles of the new Connecticut Turnpike are asphalt-paved.  This would have to be east of New Haven, as I've seen photos of a mostly concrete turnpike to the west. 

Now the question is where on I-95 is that photo taken? 

s-l1600 by Jay Hogan, on Flickr

DJStephens:
Generally makes sense.  Flexible (asphalt) pavement in frost belt states, and use of rigid (PCCP) concrete in southern states.   Not sure why states with extreme winter temperatures and conditions (Pennsylvania as a leading example) were so fixed on concrete for initial Interstate construction.  Much of it was toast by the early eighties.   Leading to perennial dowel and joint repairs.   
Did find the concrete pavement in Connecticut fascinating as a kid though, in the seventies.  Along with the flyovers, left exits, and stubs, both going into the woods, or extending into mid-air.

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