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New York State Thruway

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Ian:

--- Quote from: vdeane on September 22, 2014, 12:53:37 PM ---
--- Quote from: Flyer78 on September 22, 2014, 12:42:07 AM ---Law enforcement can use them for speed enforcement as well. Yes, the numbers under it are the reference location, also common on other NY Interstates. (I-690 around Syracuse has them. I forget which county on NY17/I-86 - but it actually uses the NY Reference Marker instead of the lapsed/elapsed distance).

--- End quote ---
I-81 is Oswego and Jefferson Counties has its turnouts numbered sequentially.  They start at 1 near Oneida Lake and increase into the 60s near the border.  I-781 does as well (numbered 1 and 2).

--- End quote ---

The Northway (I-87) in Warren and Essex Counties do as well.

vdeane:

--- Quote from: Flyer78 on September 22, 2014, 02:15:38 PM ---Now that you mention it, Cortland county on I-81 is the same way, sequentially. I think there are even some with suffixes.

--- End quote ---
Cortland uses letters.  Broome and Onondaga use the same hundredth mile indicators as the Thruway.

It's odd that every area uses something completely different - not even a change at regions, but at counties.

machias:

--- Quote from: vdeane on September 22, 2014, 12:53:37 PM ---
--- Quote from: Flyer78 on September 22, 2014, 12:42:07 AM ---Law enforcement can use them for speed enforcement as well. Yes, the numbers under it are the reference location, also common on other NY Interstates. (I-690 around Syracuse has them. I forget which county on NY17/I-86 - but it actually uses the NY Reference Marker instead of the lapsed/elapsed distance).

--- End quote ---
I-81 is Oswego and Jefferson Counties has its turnouts numbered sequentially.  They start at 1 near Oneida Lake and increase into the 60s near the border.  I-781 does as well (numbered 1 and 2).

--- End quote ---

Oswego County had them first on I-81 and then I think Jefferson County just continued the sequence.

The Thruway started out with vertical signs mounted on one post in the Syracuse area and then they switched to horizontal.  Some of the sign posts still have a shorter than normal reflective strip to accommodate this.

Alps:
As far as ground-mounted signs vs. overhead, it's because they're cheaper. You're supposed to have overhead signs with 3 or more lanes of traffic, but you don't need them with 2 lanes. (I believe that's MUTCD, but it might be AASHTO Green Book.)

hbelkins:

--- Quote from: vdeane on September 22, 2014, 05:54:55 PM ---It's odd that every area uses something completely different - not even a change at regions, but at counties.

--- End quote ---

Probably what the local law enforcement and emergency services dispatchers prefer in each locality, since they're the personnel who will be using the median crossings.


--- Quote from: Alps on September 22, 2014, 08:27:01 PM ---As far as ground-mounted signs vs. overhead, it's because they're cheaper. You're supposed to have overhead signs with 3 or more lanes of traffic, but you don't need them with 2 lanes. (I believe that's MUTCD, but it might be AASHTO Green Book.)

--- End quote ---

Kentucky installed ground-mounted signs for Exit 96 on I-64 after it was widened to three lanes. Also for Exit 87. However, the exit between the two (Exit 94) has an overhead.

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