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West Virginia

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sprjus4:
Those routes would technically be considered four lane limited access, given they are both four lanes wide (2 in each direction) and have a limited access right of way (no private driveways).

However, they would not technically be considered freeways (with full control of access), outside of what West Virginia may think.

If this bill passes, I imagine 80 mph would largely only be posted on I-64. The Turnpike and I-79 are too curvy to safely handle a higher legal limit (Iíve certainly hit 80 mph on I-79, but itís definitely tight around a lot of corners). Maybe 75 mph could be permitted in some areas? Iím not sure about I-77 north of Charleston, itís been many years since Iíve driven that portion.

I-64 west of Charleston and I-64 east of Beckley seem straight enough in most areas to legally permit 80 mph.

Didnít the DOT specifically not post even 70 mph on the corridor highways? I could certainly never see them being 80 mphÖ Texas does not even post above 75 mph on non-freeways. I could reasonably see them going to 70 mph, but they seem pretty adamant on 65 mph.

hbelkins:

--- Quote from: seicer on March 08, 2023, 02:31:37 PM ---Corridor routes and areas with strict access control would qualify as "four-lane limited access highways" in this bill. That would include all Corridor routes and a few specific other highways - such as US 250 south of Wheeling, WV 2 south of Weirton, WV 43, WV 9, US 33 east of Elkins, US 340, etc. I think we've debated freeways versus expressways here before, but West Virginia believes that some of its expressways are freeways even though they have at-grade intersections.

--- End quote ---

Also US 35.

There seems to be universal confusion over terms such as "controlled access" and "limited access." I remember seeing the terms "access fully controlled" and "access partially controlled" on West Virginia maps. Being from Kentucky, I'm more familiar with the term "limited access" and its meaning here, which is a full freeway with no at-grade intersections and all intersections being grade-separated interchanges. West Virginia uses "fully controlled" for freeways and "partially controlled" for the surface routes that have at-grade intersections and private access to the road is by permit only.

GCrites80s:
I feel like I've seen those terms on signs as well in WV.

seicer:
Design speeds also need to be taken into account. Many of the corridor routes are older, with some routes still sporting minimal left shoulders and curbed grassy medians, blind intersections, and too many intersections with traffic lights. There is a huge difference in design between the oldest Corridor G segments and those along Corridor H. Even relatively new segments of Corridor H are getting sullied with too many traffic lights, making 70-75 MPH speeds unrealistic.

seicer:

--- Quote from: hbelkins on March 08, 2023, 08:06:31 PM ---
--- Quote from: seicer on March 08, 2023, 02:31:37 PM ---Corridor routes and areas with strict access control would qualify as "four-lane limited access highways" in this bill. That would include all Corridor routes and a few specific other highways - such as US 250 south of Wheeling, WV 2 south of Weirton, WV 43, WV 9, US 33 east of Elkins, US 340, etc. I think we've debated freeways versus expressways here before, but West Virginia believes that some of its expressways are freeways even though they have at-grade intersections.

--- End quote ---

Also US 35.

--- End quote ---

I noticed that US 35 sports the same unique blue milemarkers that are used elsewhere on Corridor highways.

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