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Why does the Indian Nation Turnpike exist?

Started by Ellie, April 17, 2023, 12:27:29 PM

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splashflash

US 82 west of Paris has or has planned widening to four lane divided.  Maybe US 82 east of Paris will follow suit once this study is completed: https://www.txdot.gov/projects/projects-studies/statewide/us82-corridor-study.html

East of Blossom the traffic counts on US 82 drop off too but if it were 4 lanes, it would have potential to pick up traffic volume to funnel to the INT.


edwaleni

Quote from: edwaleni on April 18, 2023, 07:11:35 PM
My parents lived in Tulsa when the Cimmaron was in development. In fact my parents saw the town of Keyesport (and some others) before they were forced to relocate for the lake.

My father said the Cimmaron was really for Oklahoma State University. The upgrade of the rest of the route to Enid came later to support Vance AFB.

As for the Hugo-Durant question, my armchair thought is that at the time Houston was a major port at the time and it made sense to increase capacity.  Also I would look at when the Arkansas-Verdigris waterway was built for the Port of Tulsa and Catoosa.

As for Durant, and the traffic pushing north from Dallas, I assume that NAFTA and increased Mexican trade has caused traffic to increase to KCMO. Something not anticipated in 1954.

The McClellan—Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System opened for barge traffic in 1971. 17 years after the Hugo route was put together.

rte66man

Quote from: edwaleni on April 19, 2023, 03:41:06 PM
Quote from: edwaleni on April 18, 2023, 07:11:35 PM
My parents lived in Tulsa when the Cimmaron was in development. In fact my parents saw the town of Keyesport (and some others) before they were forced to relocate for the lake.

My father said the Cimmaron was really for Oklahoma State University. The upgrade of the rest of the route to Enid came later to support Vance AFB.

As for the Hugo-Durant question, my armchair thought is that at the time Houston was a major port at the time and it made sense to increase capacity.  Also I would look at when the Arkansas-Verdigris waterway was built for the Port of Tulsa and Catoosa.

As for Durant, and the traffic pushing north from Dallas, I assume that NAFTA and increased Mexican trade has caused traffic to increase to KCMO. Something not anticipated in 1954.

The McClellan—Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System opened for barge traffic in 1971. 17 years after the Hugo route was put together.

It was chiefly done as a quid pro quo for approval of other turnpikes. As mentioned upthread, Gene Stipe was heavily involved and he controlled enough votes to kill it otherwise.

There have been various efforts over the years to ensure all parts of the state were connected by a turnpike. Woodward-OKC, Altus-Elk City, etc. Most ended up as 4 lane highways (OK6, US 270). the Indian Nation ended up as a turnpike because the Little Dixie crowd didn't want to wait 40 years.
When you come to a fork in the road... TAKE IT.

                                                               -Yogi Berra

Chris

This 1970 map shows a planned freeway from Hugo to Paris. This was never built, but apparently an extension of the Indian Nation Turnpike into Texas was planned at some time?



Source of map, DFW Freeways: http://dallasfreeways.com/dfwfreeways/old-highway-maps/1970_arco_ne_texas_med.jpg

The Ghostbuster

If this freeway or tollway extension had been built, they probably wouldn't have needed to expand US 271 to four lanes between Hugo, OK and Paris, TX.

rte66man

Quote from: The Ghostbuster on July 11, 2023, 08:36:43 PM
If this freeway or tollway extension had been built, they probably wouldn't have needed to expand US 271 to four lanes between Hugo, OK and Paris, TX.

It is the path of the current 4 lanes, just not as a freeway. There isn't enough traffic to justify one.
When you come to a fork in the road... TAKE IT.

                                                               -Yogi Berra

bugo

Quote from: Ellie on April 17, 2023, 10:59:20 PM
There's plenty of... questionable... turnpikes in the state. That one, the Cimarron, the Kickapoo, and the Cherokee all come to mind. Not that those roads aren't at all useful, but I cannot imagine any other state building them as turnpikes instead of as free roads. Usually states only build the most important routes as turnpikes (e.g. the Kansas Turnpike, Ohio Turnpike, etc) or have turnpikes as efficient freeway routes in urban areas (e.g. Texas, California, Florida) but Oklahoma has plenty of turnpikes that are neither particularly important for long-distance travel or urban.

The Cimarron and Cherokee Turnpikes are "questionable"? They're part of a major highway that is slated to become an Interstate in the next few years. And old OK 33 between Locust Grove and Flint was an absolute death trap. That road should have been 4 lanes 30 years before the turnpike was built. How to say you've never driven old OK 33 without saying you've never driven old OK 33.
Nobody is on the level of the devil.

bugo

Quote from: rte66man on April 18, 2023, 11:24:07 AM
I should see if Bugo has an old "I Drove 33 And Survived" bumper sticker.

I found it on a website years ago, and I don't have the bumper sticker itself, just this image. I have thought about printing it out and making a bumper sticker out of it. I remember back in the 1970s seeing bumper stickers that said something like "Pray for me, I drive US 71". The stickers disappeared,  but US 71 still hasn't been bypassed between Ft Smith and Texarkana.

Nobody is on the level of the devil.

bugo

Quote from: edwaleni on April 18, 2023, 07:11:35 PM
My parents lived in Tulsa when the Cimmaron was in development. In fact my parents saw the town of Keyesport (and some others) before they were forced to relocate for the lake.

Where is Keyesport? Do you mean Keystone or Appalachia, both which were inundated by the waters of Keystone Lake. Mannford was also flooded.
Nobody is on the level of the devil.

The Ghostbuster

As to the comment on "questionable turnpikes", the only questionable turnpike I find in Oklahoma is the Chickasaw Turnpike, since most of it was never constructed.



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