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Author Topic: Utah  (Read 55825 times)

Rothman

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Re: Utah
« Reply #225 on: June 07, 2021, 07:05:03 AM »

We as a country need to go back and rethink the environmental laws we have on the books. I understand the need for protecting our environment and as someone who spends much of their time outdoors and in our parks I appreciate conservation efforts.

That said we shouldn’t have projects left and right delayed or canceled due to unreasonable environmental restrictions.
I'd imagine 90% of the projects out there are not delayed by environmental work, if not more.  Most federal-aid projects are categorical exclusions to NEPA.
Interesting given the fact that it takes years and years longer to get a project going today than it used to before environmental laws were on the books.

Again, your umbrella statement is not supported by reality.  I have direct experience with federal-aid project development.  All simple federal-aid projects that don't need ROW or other special considerations can get going within a fiscal year.  Even with ROW, here in NY, that is given an additional year in the project schedule to deal with property needs.  Environmental determination can be had on these projects by design approval without affecting the schedule (i.e., when you're supposed to).  These types of projects represent the massive bulk of states' programs and the environmental paperwork's cost is a matter of actual cost (people's salaries devoted to the work at state and federal levels plus overhead) rather than a major detriment to the schedule.

For the few, larger projects that are actually building new facilities or widening them -- you know, projects that actually have an environmental impact -- sure, the process takes a little longer to do those reviews and for good reason.  Still, I've been amazed by how quickly the I-81 project here in NY made it through the DEIS, especially after MA's EIS experience with the Big Dig.

Therefore, if there are "years and years" of delay, I doubt the major factor is the environmental review.  You can add a year or two for that in the case of these larger projects.  But, more than that indicates a lack of funding or political desire for the project to progress rather than environmental concerns.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2021, 07:07:12 AM by Rothman »
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BigManFromAFRICA88

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Re: Utah
« Reply #226 on: June 08, 2021, 02:48:54 PM »

We as a country need to go back and rethink the environmental laws we have on the books. I understand the need for protecting our environment and as someone who spends much of their time outdoors and in our parks I appreciate conservation efforts.

That said we shouldn’t have projects left and right delayed or canceled due to unreasonable environmental restrictions.
I'd imagine 90% of the projects out there are not delayed by environmental work, if not more.  Most federal-aid projects are categorical exclusions to NEPA.
Interesting given the fact that it takes years and years longer to get a project going today than it used to before environmental laws were on the books.

Again, your umbrella statement is not supported by reality.  I have direct experience with federal-aid project development.  All simple federal-aid projects that don't need ROW or other special considerations can get going within a fiscal year.  Even with ROW, here in NY, that is given an additional year in the project schedule to deal with property needs.  Environmental determination can be had on these projects by design approval without affecting the schedule (i.e., when you're supposed to).  These types of projects represent the massive bulk of states' programs and the environmental paperwork's cost is a matter of actual cost (people's salaries devoted to the work at state and federal levels plus overhead) rather than a major detriment to the schedule.

For the few, larger projects that are actually building new facilities or widening them -- you know, projects that actually have an environmental impact -- sure, the process takes a little longer to do those reviews and for good reason.  Still, I've been amazed by how quickly the I-81 project here in NY made it through the DEIS, especially after MA's EIS experience with the Big Dig.

Therefore, if there are "years and years" of delay, I doubt the major factor is the environmental review.  You can add a year or two for that in the case of these larger projects.  But, more than that indicates a lack of funding or political desire for the project to progress rather than environmental concerns.


I have far fewer expertise than Rothman in terms of DOT experience but I want to emphasize some of the last points that it mainly comes down to funding. Big projects require a large amount of taxes or alternate forms of funding, and the recent trend in the US is that people just don't want to fund those projects as much. Some don't want to fund them due to concerns on government spending; some don't want to fund them due to conservational activism. I think the delays are a confluence of both that and various other factors... you can't just pin the blame on environmental laws.

Plus, I personally think it's good that we have longer EIS processes to make sure that a route is going exactly where it should go, especially with the technology and analytics we have today.
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jakeroot

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Re: Utah
« Reply #227 on: June 08, 2021, 04:52:33 PM »

Plus, I personally think it's good that we have longer EIS processes to make sure that a route is going exactly where it should go, especially with the technology and analytics we have today.

As long as we're underscoring each other here, I will underscore this point. The EIS process is not fast (it shouldn't be fast, as there are way too many factors at play), but modern technology should make the EIS process easier, no matter if you're using GIS data to highlight a highway routing that impacts certain kinds of soil the least, or setting up an online open house to invite comments and feedback.

I suppose there are some places where it's easier (flat areas?), but around here, the EIS process is really essential: tons of little creeks and tributaries; the soil changes every 20 feet; hills, valleys, and farmland; protected animals and trees; other projects(!); you can't just throw the environmental review process to the wind because it extends project timelines. Apart from relatively unusual circumstances, there is usually an alternative that works for everyone that can be find through an effective EIS process.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #228 on: June 09, 2021, 09:06:30 PM »

We as a country need to go back and rethink the environmental laws we have on the books. I understand the need for protecting our environment and as someone who spends much of their time outdoors and in our parks I appreciate conservation efforts.

That said we shouldn’t have projects left and right delayed or canceled due to unreasonable environmental restrictions.
I'd imagine 90% of the projects out there are not delayed by environmental work, if not more.  Most federal-aid projects are categorical exclusions to NEPA.
Interesting given the fact that it takes years and years longer to get a project going today than it used to before environmental laws were on the books.

Again, your umbrella statement is not supported by reality.  I have direct experience with federal-aid project development.  All simple federal-aid projects that don't need ROW or other special considerations can get going within a fiscal year.  Even with ROW, here in NY, that is given an additional year in the project schedule to deal with property needs.  Environmental determination can be had on these projects by design approval without affecting the schedule (i.e., when you're supposed to).  These types of projects represent the massive bulk of states' programs and the environmental paperwork's cost is a matter of actual cost (people's salaries devoted to the work at state and federal levels plus overhead) rather than a major detriment to the schedule.

For the few, larger projects that are actually building new facilities or widening them -- you know, projects that actually have an environmental impact -- sure, the process takes a little longer to do those reviews and for good reason.  Still, I've been amazed by how quickly the I-81 project here in NY made it through the DEIS, especially after MA's EIS experience with the Big Dig.

Therefore, if there are "years and years" of delay, I doubt the major factor is the environmental review.  You can add a year or two for that in the case of these larger projects.  But, more than that indicates a lack of funding or political desire for the project to progress rather than environmental concerns.
I hear what you’re saying but you’re not convincing me that our current process isn’t causing unnecessarily long delays in road projects. The Golden Gate Bridge was conceived, funded, and built in less than 6 years. There has to be middle ground between that and taking 20+ years to build a new bay bridge. Projects all across the country suffer this fate or close to it. I see article after article detailing how it takes DOTs decades to complete a project from its inception from the EIS to the public input.

This is infrastructure that was needed yesterday yet somehow we seem perfectly content with telling people sitting in soul crushing traffic don’t worry the new train or additional freeway lanes will be here in 10 years. Meanwhile in China:

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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #229 on: June 09, 2021, 09:07:29 PM »

Plus, I personally think it's good that we have longer EIS processes to make sure that a route is going exactly where it should go, especially with the technology and analytics we have today.

As long as we're underscoring each other here, I will underscore this point. The EIS process is not fast (it shouldn't be fast, as there are way too many factors at play), but modern technology should make the EIS process easier, no matter if you're using GIS data to highlight a highway routing that impacts certain kinds of soil the least, or setting up an online open house to invite comments and feedback.

I suppose there are some places where it's easier (flat areas?), but around here, the EIS process is really essential: tons of little creeks and tributaries; the soil changes every 20 feet; hills, valleys, and farmland; protected animals and trees; other projects(!); you can't just throw the environmental review process to the wind because it extends project timelines. Apart from relatively unusual circumstances, there is usually an alternative that works for everyone that can be find through an effective EIS process.
Yet that’s always the argument I hear when I dare criticize the EIS process is that we can’t just do away with it. I’m not suggesting that.
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triplemultiplex

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Re: Utah
« Reply #230 on: June 09, 2021, 10:47:03 PM »

Yes, fascist regimes like China can build shit faster.  At the cost of your liberty.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #231 on: June 09, 2021, 11:26:51 PM »

Yes, fascist regimes like China can build shit faster.  At the cost of your liberty.
As I said, there is middle ground.
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i-215

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Re: Utah
« Reply #232 on: June 22, 2021, 11:45:54 PM »

It's not like Los Angeles County which nearly killed a widening project for the I-710 freeway -- after over 10 years of EIS.
https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-05-27/l-a-transportation-leaders-stop-short-of-pulling-the-plug-on-710-freeway-expansion

Utah seems to strike a fairly reasonable middle ground.  Mountain View Corridor was (I believe) about 6-7 years from the beginning of the EIS process to first construction.  Which gave time for the state legislature to cobble together funding to actually build it.   And the EIS appears quite thorough.  MVC hasn't been a magnet for law suits and is actually getting built out. 
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #233 on: June 23, 2021, 12:50:09 AM »

I see something like the West Davis Highway further north as a perfect example of how the environmental process should work when you're talking about building roads through sensitive areas. UDOT spent 3 years writing up a draft EIS and was willing to work with the various environmental groups that put up a fight. They spent another four years studying additional alternatives, making concessions, and ironing out changes to the original plan before getting a final EIS and record of decision done, and for the most part even the environmentalists seem to be satisfied with the final product. (Of course, it took another 4 years for construction to actually start due to funding issues and covid.)

UDOT learned their lesson from when they first tried to build the Legacy Parkway. The initial EIS for that project was rather incomplete and rushed, and as a result it spent four years getting dragged through lawsuits before a compromise was worked out that included a whole laundry list of concessions UDOT had to make (some of which were a little excessive in my opinion). The highway was supposed to be done for the 2002 Olympics ... it did not open until 2008.

Mountain View is a different animal because it doesn't involve major environmental issues like wetlands (Legacy, West Davis) or endangered species (Northern Corridor). It's just a suburban/exurban highway - and for the most part, there isn't really a huge NIMBY mentality in Utah with respect to roads (sure there's some, but way less than you see in other parts of the US). It's only when environmental issues come into play that projects around here really run into roadblocks.

andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #234 on: July 10, 2021, 09:37:25 AM »

Utah 9 in Springdale at the entrance to Zion National Park was damaged by a flood caused by a thunderstorm that dropped an inch of rain in an hour on June 29. Over 100 cars were in the path of floodwater, along with several buildings. The local Quality Inn is likely a total loss due to the volume of water and mud in the building. Also significantly damaged were Cable Mountain Lodge and Zion Campfire Lodge.

Some articles including videos:

https://www.thedrive.com/news/41376/flash-flood-in-zion-national-park-buries-over-100-cars-in-red-mud

https://www.outtherecolorado.com/news/video-terrifying-footage-shows-family-caught-in-flash-flood-in-zion/article_9ddfb980-df3f-11eb-a5f0-1f3dc15e8588.amp.html

https://www.ksl.com/article/50195787/zion-national-park-officials-cleaning-up-after-flash-floods-sweep-southern-utah

Utah 9 was closed in Springdale and suffered some pavement damage from the flood of mud, boulders, and debris. It has since reopened as cleanup continued over the past week.  Details from a June 30 release from the National Park Service:

https://www.nps.gov/zion/learn/news/zion-national-park-continues-clean-up-after-flash-flood.htm

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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #235 on: July 10, 2021, 03:34:02 PM »

They also doing tunnel work in Zion to the main tunnel and I only found that out after driving 30 minutes from La Verkin. I was on my way from LA to Moab and since I travel so much I often get bored of interstates and prefer the two lane backroads. I do wish they’d put a sign at La Verkin though the closure was listed on their website. Oh well.

Oddly enough I found myself wondering how the flood control was around here given the narrow canyon and lots of impermeable surfaces natural or otherwise. I also got my first dose of how bad traffic can really be going through the west entrance. A low key personal rapid transit system would be cool to test out here.
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #236 on: July 29, 2021, 01:40:05 PM »

Sandstorm caused multiple car accident on July 25, 2021, with 8 fatalities on Interstate 15 near Kanosh.

https://www.9news.com/mobile/article/news/nation-world/pileup-in-utah-during-sandstorm/507-d9472a3f-a4b7-4abc-b94b-428dae2ee17c

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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #237 on: July 29, 2021, 03:41:28 PM »

Sandstorm caused multiple car accident on July 25, 2021, with 8 fatalities on Interstate 15 near Kanosh.

https://www.9news.com/mobile/article/news/nation-world/pileup-in-utah-during-sandstorm/507-d9472a3f-a4b7-4abc-b94b-428dae2ee17c

Yeah, this was brutal. Second deadliest weather event in Utah since the NWS started keeping track of this in 1950 (the worst was a 2015 flash flood in Hildale that killed 12).

The dust storm was probably caused by outflow winds from nearby thunderstorms over the mountains east of 15, but those storms were fairly weak and the highest reported wind gust was 36 mph … which is not unusual at all in the inland west. To be honest I’m sort of surprised this type of thing isn’t more common in Utah. I would have to imagine the ongoing drought made it a lot easier for the wind to pick up that dust.

As a result of this, UDOT meteorologists are installing a new portable weather station with a camera in the area. The station is supposed to connect to a new set of dust-storm warning signs with beacons that will flash when low visibility conditions are occurring.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 03:46:51 PM by US 89 »
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #238 on: July 29, 2021, 05:14:11 PM »

Sandstorm caused multiple car accident on July 25, 2021, with 8 fatalities on Interstate 15 near Kanosh.

https://www.9news.com/mobile/article/news/nation-world/pileup-in-utah-during-sandstorm/507-d9472a3f-a4b7-4abc-b94b-428dae2ee17c

Yeah, this was brutal. Second deadliest weather event in Utah since the NWS started keeping track of this in 1950 (the worst was a 2015 flash flood in Hildale that killed 12).

The dust storm was probably caused by outflow winds from nearby thunderstorms over the mountains east of 15, but those storms were fairly weak and the highest reported wind gust was 36 mph … which is not unusual at all in the inland west. To be honest I’m sort of surprised this type of thing isn’t more common in Utah. I would have to imagine the ongoing drought made it a lot easier for the wind to pick up that dust.

As a result of this, UDOT meteorologists are installing a new portable weather station with a camera in the area. The station is supposed to connect to a new set of dust-storm warning signs with beacons that will flash when low visibility conditions are occurring.

This was a surprising story to me.  I've driven through this area multiple times and have noticed high wind speeds previously... but no dust storms. I'm sure signs and alerts will be added here to improve motorist safety. But still, what a tragedy for those involved. This happened after the Pioneer Day weekend which may have increased traffic on the 25th.

(Edited to correct erroneous reference to a non existent religious holiday. My bad.)

More on this from the Salt Lake Tribune:

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2021/07/25/least-dead-vehicle/

Quote
Five of the dead were members of the same family, traveling in a Buick, according to UHP. They were: Race Sawyer, 37, of Lehi, who was driving, and his son, Rider, 12; Kortni Sawyer, 30, of St. George, who was Race’s sister-in-law, and her son, Riggins, 6, and daughter, Franki, 2.

UHP also said a married couple in a Hyundai were killed: Richard Lorenzon, 51, who was driving, and Maricela Lorenzon, 47, both from Salt Lake City. According to Maricela’s Facebook page, they had four daughters.

A 15-year-old boy, Cameron Valentine of Yuma, Ariz. — who was a passenger in a Cadillac — also was killed, UHP reported. ...

The collisions happened about 4:30 p.m. on Interstate 15 near milepost 152, between the Meadow and Kanosh exits in Millard County, about 150 miles south of Salt Lake City.

The crashes happened, UHP officials said, when high winds kicked up sand or dust, which impaired drivers’ visibility on the highway.

According to the UHP, the series of collisions started with several minor crashes blocking the freeway. Then a semi-trailer truck, as it was slowing down to stop, rear-ended a pickup truck. UHP reported that the most serious crashes happened behind the semi, as two vehicles became wedged under the back of the trailer. Those vehicles were then hit from behind by another pickup, while another vehicle apparently sideswiped the trailer.

Traffic was halted overnight on both sides of the interstate while UHP investigated the accident, and traffic was diverted through Meadow and Kanosh on State Route 133 before being allowed back on the freeway. By late morning, traffic was reopened in both directions.


SM-G975U
« Last Edit: July 30, 2021, 09:56:45 AM by andy3175 »
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Rothman

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Re: Utah
« Reply #239 on: July 29, 2021, 09:05:24 PM »

Wait, us Mormons have holy weekends? :D

Please don't say you meant Pioneer Day... :D
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #240 on: July 29, 2021, 10:19:15 PM »

Wait, us Mormons have holy weekends? :D

Please don't say you meant Pioneer Day... :D
Perhaps not an LDS holiday. From the original article:

Quote
Roadways on Sunday were full of drivers headed home after a long weekend to celebrate a state holiday recognizing Utah history and settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who trekked west in search of religious freedom.




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Rothman

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Re: Utah
« Reply #241 on: July 29, 2021, 10:54:09 PM »

Wait, us Mormons have holy weekends? :D

Please don't say you meant Pioneer Day... :D
Perhaps not an LDS holiday. From the original article:

Quote
Roadways on Sunday were full of drivers headed home after a long weekend to celebrate a state holiday recognizing Utah history and settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who trekked west in search of religious freedom.




SM-G975U
Right, Pioneer Day, just celebrating the arrival of Mormons into the Salt Lake Valley.  Not a "holy weekend."  It's nowhere near, say, Yom Kippur. :D
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #242 on: July 29, 2021, 11:17:25 PM »

Wait, us Mormons have holy weekends? :D

Please don't say you meant Pioneer Day... :D
Perhaps not an LDS holiday. From the original article:

Quote
Roadways on Sunday were full of drivers headed home after a long weekend to celebrate a state holiday recognizing Utah history and settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who trekked west in search of religious freedom.




SM-G975U
Right, Pioneer Day, just celebrating the arrival of Mormons into the Salt Lake Valley.  Not a "holy weekend."  It's nowhere near, say, Yom Kippur. :D

Agreed. Thanks. I corrected the original post.

« Last Edit: July 30, 2021, 09:57:30 AM by andy3175 »
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #243 on: July 29, 2021, 11:29:02 PM »

On another note, monsoonal storms are causing damage to roads across Southern Utah... in addition to the damage caused by storms at Zion and Springdale, storms have caused roadway damage in Moab and Cedar City.

https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/flash-floods-sweep-through-the-streets-of-moab/amp/

https://www.abc4.com/news/southern-utah/real-shock-iron-county-residents-seek-help-preparing-for-future-flash-floods/

« Last Edit: July 30, 2021, 09:54:54 AM by andy3175 »
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #244 on: July 30, 2021, 01:04:38 AM »

^ For what it's worth, your Deseret News link and quote are from 2013...

The past few weeks have certainly been one of the most productive monsoon periods I've seen in Utah. In fact, the NWS office in Salt Lake City has issued at least one flash flood warning on each of the past 11 days - mostly in various small drainages and tourist areas of southern Utah. And the rainfall rates coming from these storms are nuts - Beaver had almost 2 inches in the span of an hour today, and one weather station on I-15 just north of Anderson Jct (SR 17) recorded 0.90" in 10 minutes. Cedar City is one place that absolutely does not need any more rain after some very heavy rain earlier this week flooded several homes.

The floods in northern Utah have mostly been coming from burn scar areas. Don't be surprised if we have some flood issues with US 6 between Emma Park Rd and US 191 at Castle Gate at some point in the next few days. That is right below the burn scar from the Bear Fire (which closed US 6 for a time while it was burning last month), and any debris flow from that burn area would have to cross 6 as it makes its way downhill to the Price River. There are several other burn scars in southern Utah County near the Mapleton/Spanish Fork areas that are being closely monitored as well.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2021, 10:16:17 AM by US 89 »
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #245 on: July 30, 2021, 09:54:13 AM »

^ For what it's worth, your Deseret News link and quote are from 2013...

The past few weeks have certainly been one of the most productive monsoon periods I've seen in Utah. In fact, the NWS office in Salt Lake City has issued at least one flash flood warning on each of the past 11 days - mostly in various small drainages and tourist areas of southern Utah. And the rainfall rates coming from these storms are nuts - Beaver had almost 2 inches in the span of an hour today, and one weather station on I-15 just north of Anderson Jct (SR 17) recorded 0.90" in 10 minutes. Cedar City is one place that absolutely does not need any more rain after some very heavy rain earlier this week flooded several homes.

The floods in northern Utah have mostly been coming from burn scar areas. Don't be surprised if we have some flood issues with US 6 between Emma Park Rd and US 191 at Castle Gate at some point in the next few days. That is right below the burn scar from the Bear Fire (which closed US 6 for a time while it was burning last month, and any debris flow from that burn area would have to cross 6 as it makes its way downhill to the Price River. There are several other burn scars in southern Utah County near the Mapleton/Spanish Fork areas that are being closely monitored as well.
Thanks... that's what I get for reading the content and not the date! I'll go back and remove that link since it's not timely!

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Re: Utah
« Reply #246 on: August 09, 2021, 11:33:54 PM »

Per several news articles, AASHTO approved a bunch of new US Bicycle Routes and extensions of existing routes at their 2021 spring meeting. A UDOT interactive map of new and existing USBRs is available online.

Summary of changes and routings

USBR 70 - no changes:
  • Begins in Cedar City concurrent with USBR 79
  • SR 14 to west of Duck Creek Village
  • Mammoth Creek Rd to south of Panguitch Lake
  • SR 143 to Panguitch
  • US 89 to SR 12 junction (USBR 79 concurrency ends at 89/12 junction)
  • SR 12 to Torrey
  • SR 24 to Hanksville
  • SR 95 to near Blanding
  • US 191 to Monticello
  • US 491 to Colorado border

USBR 77 - brand new route, essentially a main N/S corridor through the Wasatch Front:
  • Begins in Torrey at USBR 70 (SR 24/12 intersection)
  • SR 24 to west of Salina
  • US 50 to Salina
  • US 89 to Gunnison
  • SR 28 through Nephi
  • Old US 91 to Mona
  • 200 North and Goshen Canyon Rd to Goshen
  • US 6 to Santaquin
  • SR 198 to Spanish Fork
  • SR 156 to SR 147 in Spanish Fork
  • SR 147 to US 89 SW of Mapleton
  • US 89 to 200 East in Provo
  • 200 East to 700 North
  • 700 North to US 189
  • US 189 north to the start of the Provo River Parkway trail
  • Provo River Parkway trail to Murdock Canal connector trail at Provo Canyon mouth
  • Murdock Canal connector trail and Murdock Trail north all the way to the Timpanogos Highway interchange in Lehi
  • SR 92 and Club House Dr west to Garden Dr in Thanksgiving Point
  • Garden Dr south and Desert Forest Dr west to connect to Jordan River Parkway
  • Jordan River Parkway north through Salt Lake County
  • Legacy Parkway trail north into Centerville
  • Denver and Rio Grande Rail Trail north to 4000 South in Roy
  • 4000 South to 2175 West
  • 2175 West to 4400 South
  • 4400 South to Weber Dr and the start of the Weber River Parkway
  • Weber River Parkway north to Ogden River Parkway
  • Ogden River Parkway east to US 89
  • US 89 and SR 235 to North Ogden
  • Pleasant View Drive northwest to US 89
  • US 89 to south of Brigham City
  • SR 13 and SR 90 through Brigham City
  • US 89/91 to Wellsville
  • SR 23 to Cornish
  • SR 61 to west of Lewiston
  • SR 200 to Idaho

USBR 79 - extended south to Arizona from former terminus at US 89/SR 12 intersection:
  • Begins at Arizona line on US 89A south of Kanab
  • US 89A to Kanab
  • US 89 to Panguitch (USBR 70 concurrency begins at SR 12)
  • SR 143 to south of Panguitch Lake
  • Mammoth Creek Rd south to west of Duck Creek Village
  • SR 14 to Cedar City (USBR 70 concurrency ends in Cedar City)
  • SR 130 to Minersville
  • SR 21 via Milford to the Nevada line

USBR 677 - brand new route, alternate to USBR 77 through Utah Valley:
  • Begins at USBR 77 in Goshen (US 6/Goshen Canyon Rd intersection)
  • US 6 to Elberta
  • SR 68 to SR 194 west of Lehi
  • SR 194 to Jordan River Parkway
  • Jordan River Parkway north to junction with USBR 77 at Thanksgiving Point

USBR 679 - brand new route, much shorter alternate to USBR 79 that does not go through Panguitch
  • Begins at USBR 79 at Long Valley Junction (US 89/SR 14 intersection)
  • SR 14 west to USBR 70/79 at Mammoth Creek Rd

USBR 877 - brand new route, connects USBR 70/79 at Panguitch to USBR 77 at Sigurd
  • Begins at USBR 70/79 in Panguitch (US 89/SR 143 intersection)
  • US 89 north to Sevier
  • Old Highway 89 to Joseph
  • SR 118 to Richfield
  • SR 118/120 through Richfield
  • SR 118 to USBR 77 (SR 24) in Sigurd

mrsman

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Re: Utah
« Reply #247 on: August 15, 2021, 03:46:18 PM »

Wait, us Mormons have holy weekends? :D

Please don't say you meant Pioneer Day... :D
Perhaps not an LDS holiday. From the original article:

Quote
Roadways on Sunday were full of drivers headed home after a long weekend to celebrate a state holiday recognizing Utah history and settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who trekked west in search of religious freedom.




SM-G975U
Right, Pioneer Day, just celebrating the arrival of Mormons into the Salt Lake Valley.  Not a "holy weekend."  It's nowhere near, say, Yom Kippur. :D

Is Pioneer Day a state holiday in Utah?  Is it a day that only state workers get off, or is it widely celebrated?

I think a similar concept exists in Massachussets with Patriots Day.  It is celebrated on the third Monday of April, to commemorate the battles of Lexington and Concord in the Revolutionary War.  It is a state holiday, but many non-state workers also get the day off.  Given that the Boston Marathon is run on the day, and so many streets are closed, it is a day when traffic is certainly strongly discouraged.
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #248 on: August 16, 2021, 01:43:19 PM »

Wait, us Mormons have holy weekends? :D

Please don't say you meant Pioneer Day... :D
Perhaps not an LDS holiday. From the original article:

Quote
Roadways on Sunday were full of drivers headed home after a long weekend to celebrate a state holiday recognizing Utah history and settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who trekked west in search of religious freedom.




SM-G975U
Right, Pioneer Day, just celebrating the arrival of Mormons into the Salt Lake Valley.  Not a "holy weekend."  It's nowhere near, say, Yom Kippur. :D

Is Pioneer Day a state holiday in Utah?  Is it a day that only state workers get off, or is it widely celebrated?

I think a similar concept exists in Massachussets with Patriots Day.  It is celebrated on the third Monday of April, to commemorate the battles of Lexington and Concord in the Revolutionary War.  It is a state holiday, but many non-state workers also get the day off.  Given that the Boston Marathon is run on the day, and so many streets are closed, it is a day when traffic is certainly strongly discouraged.

Pioneer Day is basically the Utah version of Patriots Day. It is a state holiday but it’s well known and widely celebrated beyond just state offices. Because it’s in July, it is celebrated with fireworks - and in some areas, the frequency/intensity of those fireworks celebrations can rival or even exceed what you see on the 4th.

And for those of us Utahns who are not LDS church members, we often refer to the day as “Pie and Beer Day”. First time I saw that was on a sign in front of the Catholic church in downtown SLC several years ago. :sombrero:

Kniwt

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Re: Utah
« Reply #249 on: August 20, 2021, 12:42:51 PM »

KUTV reports that, due to "poor driving behavior," the at-grade crossing of 6200 South on Bangerter Highway is being permanently closed until the new interchange at the same location is completed.
https://kutv.com/news/local/udot-making-changes-after-dozens-of-crashes-at-one-intersection

Quote
“Over the last month, we’ve been averaging about a crash every other day. It’s really astounding," John Gleason with UDOT said.

Gleason said they know what’s causing the problem.

“It’s all because of poor driving behavior. It’s because of people running red lights, speeding."

UDOT decided change is necessary.

“We’re seeing these crashes happen time and time again. So we have to sometimes go above and beyond to assure safety. And this is one of those cases," Gleason said.

On Monday night, crews will begin the work to to close east-west access on the route.

“We’ve worked very closely with the city and with the police department, and we feel the best decision is to close down 6200 South at Bangerter. Take that stoplight that somebody people are running out of the equation," Gleason said.

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