Regional Boards > Pacific Southwest

Nevada

<< < (27/28) > >>

nexus73:

--- Quote from: Sub-Urbanite on June 17, 2021, 10:57:49 AM ---
--- Quote from: nexus73 on June 14, 2021, 08:07:10 AM ---Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

Rick

--- End quote ---

It'd be great if this was handled fairly, but the most recent data (which admittedly is 18 years old) shows that Black and Hispanic drivers were more likely to be pulled over than whites or Asians, and, more starkly, Black and Hispanic residents made up 2/3rds of Las Vegas' arrest warrants for unpaid traffic violations.

Also notably, when Carson City adopted this policy in 2019, collection on unpaid traffic fines went up.

Basically, it doesn't make sense to throw someone in jail for three days and have them deal with the disruption that comes from that, if we want people to actually pay their fines.

--- End quote ---

I had a buddy (who was white) in the Air Force, back in the Seventies, who did not pay his fines on time, so when he was caught doing something wrong while driving, off to jail he went in San Diego County!  That got his attention. 

If 2/3'rds of blacks and Hispanics are nonpayers, then the number you quoted is just reflecting the situation.  One would have to know what each race's behavior was like in order to truly know what is going on.

I have a stepnephew, also white, that lives in Vegas.  He had accumulated a few thousand dollars in unpaid fines.  Tossing him into the hoosegow also got his attention.  Eventually he did straighten out his life but it took some judicial action before he did.

Why let bad behaviors go unpunished?  Driving is a privilege, not a right. 

Rick

roadfro:

--- Quote from: nexus73 on June 18, 2021, 09:51:09 AM ---
--- Quote from: Sub-Urbanite on June 17, 2021, 10:57:49 AM ---
--- Quote from: nexus73 on June 14, 2021, 08:07:10 AM ---Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

Rick

--- End quote ---

It'd be great if this was handled fairly, but the most recent data (which admittedly is 18 years old) shows that Black and Hispanic drivers were more likely to be pulled over than whites or Asians, and, more starkly, Black and Hispanic residents made up 2/3rds of Las Vegas' arrest warrants for unpaid traffic violations.

Also notably, when Carson City adopted this policy in 2019, collection on unpaid traffic fines went up.

Basically, it doesn't make sense to throw someone in jail for three days and have them deal with the disruption that comes from that, if we want people to actually pay their fines.

--- End quote ---

I had a buddy (who was white) in the Air Force, back in the Seventies, who did not pay his fines on time, so when he was caught doing something wrong while driving, off to jail he went in San Diego County!  That got his attention. 

If 2/3'rds of blacks and Hispanics are nonpayers, then the number you quoted is just reflecting the situation.  One would have to know what each race's behavior was like in order to truly know what is going on.

I have a stepnephew, also white, that lives in Vegas.  He had accumulated a few thousand dollars in unpaid fines.  Tossing him into the hoosegow also got his attention.  Eventually he did straighten out his life but it took some judicial action before he did.

Why let bad behaviors go unpunished?  Driving is a privilege, not a right. 

Rick

--- End quote ---

Asking this question at the risk of derailing this thread of discussion... but what do you mean by the bolded statement? Generalizing by race or ethnicity should not be necessary in the context of individuals' traffic law violations and their ability to resolve them.

I agree generally with not letting bad behaviors go unpunished, but misdemeanors and possible jail time for minor traffic violations doesn't seem like the way to go. Now, if someone racks up multiple traffic infractions and doesn't pay them (or do some equivalent amount of community service if unable to pay, assuming that is an option), I would say that additional steps should be taken at that point.

nexus73:
What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick

Alps:

--- Quote from: nexus73 on June 18, 2021, 01:13:24 PM ---What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick

--- End quote ---
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

nexus73:

--- Quote from: Alps on June 18, 2021, 03:47:18 PM ---
--- Quote from: nexus73 on June 18, 2021, 01:13:24 PM ---What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick

--- End quote ---
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

--- End quote ---

While living in Tangipahoa Parish (Louisiana) back in the second half of the Nineties, I saw work groups from the county jail doing various cleaning tasks.  It was rare to see a white person despite the parish population being rather evenly split between black and white.  That was something I had not expected to see.

Black thug culture had taken over the outdoors so much that children never played outside nor did any of them ever go trick or treating on Hallowe'en.  Drug dealers gathered in packs both in the cities and countryside.  Police actually protected the drug trade so they could have informers. which the Hammond LA police chief said accounted for 99% of crimes solved.  Black neighborhoods looked totally run down while the mostly white neighborhoods had the classic middle class look.  Hammond and Ponchatoula high schools had to be moved out of town and the campuses closed to hold down the troubles.

Very Third World were the conditions.  Oh well, at least the food was good. 

Rick

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version