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UK Roads Thread

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bing101:

Here is a Tour of the A465

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3VskIfEST8

english si:

--- Quote from: Scott5114 on June 01, 2021, 07:16:30 PM ---Thanks for the explanation. Although I've done a fair bit of reading about UK roads, they do have a tendency to hurt my head at times. :spin: It makes sense that the road would retain the motorway restrictions since there's no place to go but to a road with motorway restrictions, but to roadgeeks on this side of the pond, it can be a little hard to grasp that what makes a road a "motorway" isn't the design standards of the road itself, but things like minimum speed limits and the banning of non-motorised vehicles.
--- End quote ---
Even UK roadgeeks struggle!

There isn't a minimum speed limit on a motorway, beyond a 'no stopping' rule (obviously with exemptions). Pretty sure it's only a handful of tunnels that have minimum speed limits in the UK.

--- Quote ---Theoretically, could you have a road that was to western-US "expressway" standards (divided road with at-grade intersections but no other direct access, i.e. from private driveways) carry an M number if whichever agency is responsible for enacting motorway restrictions chose to do so?
--- End quote ---
Yes. But the motorway restrictions would have to end at the cross-streets and restart again to allow prohibited vehicles to still use the cross-streets.

You'd probably keep it all 'Special Road', but have little bits where other classes of traffic can use it at junctions, but only Classes I and II between junctions (and thus make it a motorway). Even if not making it a motorway, it quite a good idea for any major new-build road to have it as a Special Road as it bans frontages and digging up for utilities, and makes it easier to ban pedestrians, etc (who'd otherwise have a legal right to use the new road, rather than being specifically allowed to use it per the Special Roads Order, meaning more hoops to jump through to restrict them).

Transport Scotland gets the idea and does tend to use it when building greenfield trunk roads. Highways England struggles with the idea that it might be wise to explicitly ban non-motorised traffic from a new-build 6-lane 70mph very busy expressway (they finally realised on the A14 scheme after about a decade of being seemingly unaware that it was an issue - and had to rush through legal orders as the road was due to open in a few months!), so even if they grasped the concept of Special Roads (they don't seem to have) they would be unlikely to use them.

--- Quote ---(Are motorway restrictions enacted by Parliament or through the actions of Highways England and/or local councils?)
--- End quote ---
It's done by secondary legislation. If the road is trunk in England then its a UK Statutory Instrument and done by a senior civil servant at Highways England or the Department of Transport on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport (eg this recent one for new slip roads off the M58). Scotland/Wales/Northern Ireland have devolved Statutory Instruments, local councils can publish local legislation (annoyingly the local stuff doesn't appear on the legislation.gov.uk website). All such legislation is laid before the relevant legislature for a period, with them allowed to debate and veto it if they so wish (very rare that they do).

bing101:

Here is a tour of the A30 and A303 near Stonehenge.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZrp2Zcf7DE

bing101:
Here is a new tour.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=12hB24DLsA4

bing101:
Here is a tour of the M25 beltway.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ptCb9ujmmo

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