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Blue Canadian school signs

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Andrew T.:
Canada's history is peppered with interesting road-sign standards that deviate from their stateside counterparts.  Some of the best examples are the blue signs that were formerly used to denote school crossings and school zones.

After two years of living in Ontario, I've come across exactly two of these:



This one is north of Sault Ste. Marie, not far off the 17.  Strangely the sign has the notation "Town of Oakville/Owl-Lite 2001" in the margin, which means it's posted 700 kilometres away from the place that made it!



Meanwhile, a specimen of the rectangular "school crossing" variation turned up at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay.



Blue signs have been around for quite a while: These scans hail from a copy of the Ontario Motor League Road Book I tracked down from 1956.  (This also means that Canada had schoolhouse-shaped pentagonal signs and graphical school crossing signs 15 years before the US!)

But how rare are blue signs on the roads today?  I've seen none in southern Ontario.

Moreover, when did the standard change from blue to blah yellow-green?

Stephane Dumas:
Briefly before the blah yellow-green, they was simply yellow they beginned to use in the mid-1990s. 

Btw, I spotted this website who collected some old photos of school sign zones. http://www.elve.net/rkidcnd.htm

Edit: An oddity about Quebec traffic signals from an Esso Imperial road map of 1957 (which my sister dumped it during a Spring cleaning :-( ). The pedestrian, school zone and railroad crossing are set with an European design!!  Sorry if I scanned it vertically. ^^;

jakeroot:
I have never seen a blue school pentagon in British Columbia. In fact, I've never seen one with my own two eyes in any part of Canada (only street-view). If they were ever common, they certainly aren't now.

There's quite a few regular yellow school pentagons in BC, which are now being superseded by the fluorescent yellow-green pentagons. If blue were ever common over here, it hasn't been for a while.

cbeach40:
TAC approved the fluorescent yellow-green in 2000, the provinces began to adopt them as standard in the following years.
In terms of rarity, the old ones are pretty well gone now in Ontario, road authorities rather aggressively replaced them in the 2000s.

Andrew T.:
Thanks for the replies!

I'm still a bit confused by the chronology of colours, though. Was there a period in the 1990s where non-fluorescent yellow and blue were both considered "current," and the choice of which colour to use was left to local or provincial prerogative until fluorescent yellow-green displaced both?  If so, that might explain the dearth of blue in BC.

The "Traffic Signs" panel on the official 1986 Ontario road map shows the blue sign only.


--- Quote from: Stephane Dumas on November 03, 2019, 06:29:53 PM ---Btw, I spotted this website who collected some old photos of school sign zones. http://www.elve.net/rkidcnd.htm
--- End quote ---
That site was around in the late 1990s!!  I had forgotten all about it!  It makes my day to know that it's still online after all these years.


--- Quote from: Stephane Dumas on November 03, 2019, 06:29:53 PM ---Edit: An oddity about Quebec traffic signals from an Esso Imperial road map of 1957 (which my sister dumped it during a Spring cleaning :-( ). The pedestrian, school zone and railroad crossing are set with an European design!!
--- End quote ---
Wow, I wonder what the story behind this was?  Did Quebec actually adopt European warning sign designs in the 1950s, or was this the artifact of a limited test like this one?

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