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Never-built highways of the Northwest

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sparker:

--- Quote from: dmuzika on July 02, 2021, 04:24:21 PM ---
--- Quote from: 1 on March 26, 2021, 11:37:48 AM ---Kelowna BC is growing rapidly. Could there be a Spokane-Kelowna-Kamloops freeway connection in the near future?

--- End quote ---

Maybe the first step could be a more direct two lane highway between Kelowna and Castlegar, from there traffic could head south to Spokane. I don't think the demand would be there for a 4 lane highway between the two cities.

--- End quote ---

Aside from some regional deliveries, including cross-border runs, US 395 north of Spokane isn't much of an interregional commercial corridor; the closest to that would be US 95 over in Idaho, which features more long-haul traffic, particularly from Seattle/Tacoma ports to Calgary and Edmonton.  There's a lot of LCL (less-than-carload) merchandise traffic that goes direct truck rather than a rail transfer, including a lot of higher-ticket electronics and other consumer merchandise (it tends to get to its destination sooner rather than dwell in a railyard); and 95/93 to either BC/AL 3 or even TC-1 over to Calgary (then up AL 2 to Edmonton as needed) is considerably shorter than schlepping through Montana.  There's a reason ID is gradually improving US 95 north of I-90, and it's cross-border commercial traffic.  Spokane isn't a major distribution hub at present; so there aren't too many large trucks heading NNW up US 395 to the smaller inland BC cities and towns.  A 4-lane facility probably isn't warranted there, and unlikely to be in the near term.  While Kelowna may be growing, it is likely to be adquately commercially served from the Vancouver distribution hub; traffic south to E. WA will be primarily recreational or incidental, which doesn't portend well for significant capacity increases.     

Bruce:
A new one I just unearthed while digging around newspaper archives in Lewiston: Will new bridge link highways, or streets? (Oct. 20, 1979)

The Washington Legislative Transportation Committee considered creating a "SR 130" for the road leading to the Southway Bridge between Clarkston and Lewiston. It describes a new road that would follow what is now Fleshman Way and then cut across to US 12.

Despite the number, it wouldn't be too far-fetched as a US 12 spur, as SR 131 was designated in 1991.

Bonus find: a relic of Idaho's attempted conversion to metric in 1977: Metrics: The conversion will be 'hard' indeed (May 22, 1977).

Quillz:

--- Quote from: TEG24601 on July 30, 2020, 01:09:57 PM ---
--- Quote from: Bruce on July 29, 2020, 09:17:13 PM ---
--- Quote from: nexus73 on July 29, 2020, 06:52:31 PM ---I-82 was originally planned to go to Seattle.  I always wondered about the backstory on that one.

Rick

--- End quote ---

The original plan was Ellensburg to Pendelton, but Washington wanted to add the rest of the US 410 corridor to Tacoma and ultimately Aberdeen in 1959 (see this news report). A key part of the plan would have been a tunnel under Naches Pass, which obviously didn't pan out.

Similarly, Oregon threw out proposals to have I-80N (later I-84) extend up to Astoria.

--- End quote ---


When I was in middle school, the library had been donated an old, leather bound, road atlas from the 1960s. In it, the road over Snoqualmie Pass was designated I-82.  I also recall seeing images of plans to convert US-12, to I-82, all the way to Aberdeen.


It is too bad that Oregon doesn't have a safe way to get to the coast, as all the routes are massively undersized for the traffic that uses them.

--- End quote ---
I vacation to Oregon a lot, I don't live there, but US-20 seems pretty adequate to me. I just drove it a couple weeks ago and it's four lanes all the way to Philomath, and the speed limit is generally 55-60 or so. Compared to other crossings such as OR-126 or OR-34, it seems a lot better. But I'm barely seeing any real traffic patterns because I'm usually on there for a couple weeks at a time.

Bickendan:

--- Quote from: Quillz on September 14, 2021, 03:37:40 AM ---
--- Quote from: TEG24601 on July 30, 2020, 01:09:57 PM ---
--- Quote from: Bruce on July 29, 2020, 09:17:13 PM ---
--- Quote from: nexus73 on July 29, 2020, 06:52:31 PM ---I-82 was originally planned to go to Seattle.  I always wondered about the backstory on that one.

Rick

--- End quote ---

The original plan was Ellensburg to Pendelton, but Washington wanted to add the rest of the US 410 corridor to Tacoma and ultimately Aberdeen in 1959 (see this news report). A key part of the plan would have been a tunnel under Naches Pass, which obviously didn't pan out.

Similarly, Oregon threw out proposals to have I-80N (later I-84) extend up to Astoria.

--- End quote ---


When I was in middle school, the library had been donated an old, leather bound, road atlas from the 1960s. In it, the road over Snoqualmie Pass was designated I-82.  I also recall seeing images of plans to convert US-12, to I-82, all the way to Aberdeen.


It is too bad that Oregon doesn't have a safe way to get to the coast, as all the routes are massively undersized for the traffic that uses them.

--- End quote ---
I vacation to Oregon a lot, I don't live there, but US-20 seems pretty adequate to me. I just drove it a couple weeks ago and it's four lanes all the way to Philomath, and the speed limit is generally 55-60 or so. Compared to other crossings such as OR-126 or OR-34, it seems a lot better. But I'm barely seeing any real traffic patterns because I'm usually on there for a couple weeks at a time.

--- End quote ---
I like OR 126... once you clear Veneta. That's not a difficult Coastal crossing, in terms of driving or traffic. US 20 is better now with the Crystal Creek Loop bypass, but it's also busier.

Alps:

--- Quote from: Bruce on September 14, 2021, 01:03:45 AM ---A new one I just unearthed while digging around newspaper archives in Lewiston: Will new bridge link highways, or streets? (Oct. 20, 1979)

The Washington Legislative Transportation Committee considered creating a "SR 130" for the road leading to the Southway Bridge between Clarkston and Lewiston. It describes a new road that would follow what is now Fleshman Way and then cut across to US 12.

Despite the number, it wouldn't be too far-fetched as a US 12 spur, as SR 131 was designated in 1991.

Bonus find: a relic of Idaho's attempted conversion to metric in 1977: Metrics: The conversion will be 'hard' indeed (May 22, 1977).



--- End quote ---
k/h? We don't talk about 40 m/h.

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