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Was there an attempt at a state highway grid in Oregon?

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xonhulu:

--- Quote ---Present-day OR-51 is almost as much of a mess as the south end of OR-219, and a similar story--straightforward north-south routing that was forced to take an east-west jog by a later rerouting, where it runs into another east-west route.  In OR-51's case, that's OR-194 (which, IIRC, on some old maps from the 90s, was shown as more OR-51, albeit which maps I can't remember--Thomas Guide, perhaps?), and with OR-219, the infamous OR-214/OR-211 mess in Woodburn.
--- End quote ---

ODOT's own bridge inventory signs on 194 give its route designation as 51, and even more absurdly, as US 51!


--- Quote ---I'd love to know what the heck they were thinking with OR-37 and OR-32, though.  I can't even really pin it on someone at ODOT having a random thing for numbers in the 30s, since there's a 29-year gap between when those two were assigned.
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The only guess I could make is that, in both cases, they picked a state route number that was close to the US Route # it was replacing:  OR 32 for US 30, OR 37 for US 395 (since OR 39 was already in use).


--- Quote from: OCGuy81 on March 05, 2021, 08:38:48 AM ---Probably asked here before but the south end of 219 was in Salem originally, correct? I’ve seen mention of 219 in Keizer, and in downtown Salem I recall a sign with a “ghost” 219 shield downtown.

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You're right on OR 219 originally ending on Salem.  I'm not sure about "ghost" 219 in downtown Salem, but there is still one on River Rd. in north Keizer.

KEK Inc.:
Curious why the grid ascends in units of 4.

Rothman:

--- Quote from: KEK Inc. on April 20, 2021, 03:06:59 AM ---Curious why the grid ascends in units of 4.

--- End quote ---
Illuminati confirmed.

NE2:

--- Quote from: KEK Inc. on April 20, 2021, 03:06:59 AM ---Curious why the grid ascends in units of 4.

--- End quote ---
Room for expansion.

sparker:

--- Quote from: NE2 on April 20, 2021, 11:57:23 PM ---
--- Quote from: KEK Inc. on April 20, 2021, 03:06:59 AM ---Curious why the grid ascends in units of 4.

--- End quote ---
Room for expansion.

--- End quote ---

The E-W signed basic state route system seems to work like this:  starting with 2 (unsigned), there's 6, then 10 farther south, unassigned 14, 18, 22, 26 & 30 held back because of US highways (although original OR 26 was US 20 from the coast to the Willamette Valley), 34, 38, 42, 46, former 50 and 54, 58, 62, 66, 70, 74, 78, 82, 86 (a later addition).  All even, and not divisible by 4.  The ones that are divisible by 4: 8, former 32, 36, 52 are all former US routes (in order 26, 30, and 28 for the last two).  N-S state routes advance by increments of 4 starting with 3 (and, correctly deduced, 37 should be 15 according to the grid) with 7, 11, 19, unassigned 23, 27, 31, 35, 39, 43, 47, and 51.  And again, interim odd numbers are former US highway alignments:  37 (see above) and 53.  One could see this as a sort of fractured grid pattern starting in the northeast corner of the state.  Curiously, OR could be said to have taken a cue from the original CA grid pattern, which laid out even-numbered highways divisible by 4 from about Stockton and basically progressing northward to the original CA 44 (with the original 28 being an outlier), while even numbers not divisible by 4 started in the northern part of the L.A. basin and originally progressed south and southeast into Orange County, ending in 26, with the extended range in the 30's located in the east and west exurbs.  Because of topology, the N-S odd-numbered routes were never able to extend a workable grid pattern, so "clusters" became the stock in trade:  1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29 in or extending out from the Bay Area, with 3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, unassigned 31, 35, 39 scattered around greater L.A.  IMO, it's a shame the Division of Highways didn't "double-down" on the original grid pattern in the '64 renumbering! 

But of the two states, OR's system has maintained more of the original attempted grid pattern, even with US 20 and 26 subsuming much of the original long-distance state routes east of the Willamette Valley (54 & 50 respectively). 

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