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Oregon Z mile markers

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KEK Inc.:
After getting my second vaccine dose, why not drive 5 hours from Seattle and go camping on the Oregon coast?! 

I noticed near Tillamook there were mile markers with Z prefixing the number on US-101.


iPhone

Alps:
Probably rerouted.

Road Hog:
Zombie evacuation route?

Bickendan:
I need pictures of these Zombie Evacuation Route/Highway, er, reroute markers!

JasonOfORoads:

--- Quote from: KEK Inc. on April 12, 2021, 04:00:40 PM ---After getting my second vaccine dose, why not drive 5 hours from Seattle and go camping on the Oregon coast?! 

I noticed near Tillamook there were mile markers with Z prefixing the number on US-101.


iPhone

--- End quote ---

This is what ODOT uses for overlapping mileage on a highway. Usually this comes about from a rerouting that is slightly longer than its original routing. However, this is a unique case that comes from the cancellation of a highway project.

Originally, the Oregon Coast Highway was planned to travel due south from Manzanita (near the intersection of US-101 and Laneda Ave., to be specific), travel down the sand spit between the ocean and the Nehalem River, cross the river, and reconnect at 101 near Nedona Beach. While waiting for it to be built, the Oregon State Highway Department designated 101 down the routing it's on today. It was considered a "temporary travelled route" because at the time, the road was a Tillamook County road from Manzanita through Nehalem to the junction of OR-53; south of there, 101 was routed along the Necanicum Highway to the Nedona Beach area. Once the new road was constructed, 101 would have been removed from the temporary routing; the northern portion would've reverted to a Tillamook County road, and the southern portion would've been an extension of OR-53.



However, with the rise of conservation efforts in the 1960s, the Nehalem sand spit route (as well as another rerouting of 101 further south near Tierra Del Mar/Pacific City) underwent a lot of scrutiny, so much so that it impacted gubernatorial politics. Long story short, environmental and erosion concerns won out, and the sand spit route wasn't consturcted. By 1972 (IIRC), the highway department negotiated with Tillamook County to take over jurisdiction of the northern portion of "temporary" 101, making it officially part of the Oregon Coast Highway and 101. The southern portion simply needed the highway commission to redesignate it as part of the Oregon Coast Highway, which was done at the same time. Instead of re-mileposting 300+ miles of Oregon Coast Highway and updating thousands of records just to make the mileage accurate, they opted to create about 4.5 miles of Z-mileage along that corridor, hence why we see the duplicate mileage today.

As for the sand spit, it became an Oregon State Park around 1972 to further protect it from development.

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