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Was US 101 south of Crescent itís in Rockslide?

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TheStranger:

--- Quote from: Max Rockatansky on July 08, 2021, 06:14:55 PM ---
--- Quote from: roadman65 on July 08, 2021, 06:07:24 PM ---So Eureka and Crescent City  and SF are the only places statewide.  Cool.

--- End quote ---

Yes, 101 essentially is about as far as a major highway can really be developed before it converted into full freeway standards.  Thatís part of the reason why Iím always surprised it rarely pops up on the Fictional Board on this forum.  The stretch through Prunedale is probably my favorite segment given how close to full limited access it is but yet has things like driveways to homes on it.

--- End quote ---
That Prunedale segment actually highlights in some ways why US 101 has not been converted to Interstate (and why it isn't suggested much outside of FritzOwl) -

- In the 1950s-1960s, US 101 had been submitted in essentially 3 segments: LA-SF (including the Central Freeway which was slated to partially carry I-80), then the concurrency with 480 (which was approved as Interstate for a few years), then Golden Gate Bridge to Route 37.  By the late 1960s the long-form route was rejected and never reconsidered for incorporation into the Interstate system (and the incompletion of the Central Freeway north of Turk Street probably also added to that). 

As noted above, the Central Freeway portion between Fell Street and the Bayshore Freeway was for a time part of the planned I-80 routing west to Golden Gate Park, but returned to solely US 101 in the mid-1960s when the controversial Western Freeway I-80 project was stopped dead cold by the freeway revolts.

Ironically, one of the portions that would have been I-480 has since been upgraded to interstate standards - the segment now known as Presidio Parkway between Route 1 (pre-1968, that portion of Route 1 was to have been I-280) and Richardson Avenue.

- Going back specifically to the Prunedale section, in the mid-2000s a bypass had been proposed (with today's 101/156 section becoming 156 alone) but was already off the table by 2014: https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=13879.0

The current improvements did help a ton in reducing the grade crossing significantly in that town, but did not do anything for widening the road or adjusting the geometry of the curvature at all, which can still be a bit tight at freeway speeds.

Beyond Prunedale, I recall that Cuesta Grade portion near San Luis Obispo is actually not freeway either.

Max Rockatansky:
Some of the other expressway segments south of SF not mentioned above would be:

-  Salinas-King City. 
-  Arroyo Grande-Buelleton.
-  Gaviota State Park-Goleta.

heynow415:

--- Quote from: Max Rockatansky on July 09, 2021, 08:00:32 AM ---Some of the other expressway segments south of SF not mentioned above would be:

-  Salinas-King City. 
-  Arroyo Grande-Buelleton.
-  Gaviota State Park-Goleta.

--- End quote ---

South of Salinas  the Central Coast section has several expressway segments:

Salinas-King City (excluding short freeway segments in Soledad, Gonzales, and Greenfield)
San Miguel - Paso Robles
Santa Margarita - SLO (Cuesta Grade)
Arroyo Grande - Nipomo
Orcutt - Goleta (excluding a short freeway segment in Buellton and occasional interchanges (Los Olivos, SR154, SR1, State beaches)

Those sections don't really need to be freeway (yet) since it's mostly rural/agricultural and interchanges have been constructed over time as needed, like at 154/San Marcos Pass. Of course, like everywhere else, mainline traffic volumes are increasing over time so making at-grade crossing or turning movements is becoming more challenging.

mrsman:
The expressway portions of US 101, IMO, is a model for the rest of the country.  If you have an important and busy corridor, yet don't have the funds for a complete freeway upgrade, this is the way a rural highway should be designed.  2 lanes in each direction, no traffic signals, generally keeping 55-65 MPH speeds, at-grade, shoulders in most places, the occasional intersection, and businesses setback from the roadway considerably.  Of course, small freeway segments as it passes through significant towns.

roadman65:

--- Quote from: mrsman on July 15, 2021, 09:06:54 AM ---The expressway portions of US 101, IMO, is a model for the rest of the country.  If you have an important and busy corridor, yet don't have the funds for a complete freeway upgrade, this is the way a rural highway should be designed.  2 lanes in each direction, no traffic signals, generally keeping 55-65 MPH speeds, at-grade, shoulders in most places, the occasional intersection, and businesses setback from the roadway considerably.  Of course, small freeway segments as it passes through significant towns.

--- End quote ---

INDOT is trying to make US 31 between Indy and South Bend that way. 


Removed repetitive and broken quotes. óRoadfro

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