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Author Topic: California  (Read 178474 times)

jrouse

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Re: California
« Reply #1275 on: June 10, 2021, 04:16:02 PM »

Glad I am not driving in Sacto!  That is an ambitious schedule.  Hope it works!

Rick

Seeing as how that stretch of freeway opened 60 years ago this year -- and the pavement is pretty well trashed (particularly the ramps!), the decision to do it with one shot is a tradeoff between six days of inconvenience to local users or a protracted schedule of reconstruction with partial lane closures and numerous short detours.  Of course, the safety of the construction crews and those who would be driving on the freeway during "normal" spot-type construction would have been taken into consideration.  I would imagine that part of the decision process to do a complete shutdown was the presence of parallel I-5; longer-distance commercial movements that don't specify the east part of Elk Grove or Galt would simply shunt over to the Interstate via either CA 120 or CA 4 farther south and US 50 on the north.  Commuters to those same areas will be the most inconvenienced, but hopefully they received plenty of advance notice.  I think we're going to see more construction/reconstruction projects undertaken this way due to both time constraints and liability issues.   

I am inclined to agree.  Weighing the options of the typical weeks/months-long projects while keeping a route open vs taking a few days or a week of inconvenience and detours, I think that most people would gladly take the tradeoff and simply close the freeway for a few days.  With enough publicity, the traffic nightmares that many predict don't actually end up happening.  People find a way to adapt.
In my 22 years at Caltrans I have seen several of these major closures.  They have gone off pretty much without a hitch.  The massive amount of public outreach does make a difference.  Like the previous poster said, people listen and adjust.   If the W-X Fix50 bridge deck rebuild a few years ago was any indication, Caltrans will most likely halt the widening/reconstruction work that’s underway on I-5 while 99 is closed.  They shut down the widening/rehab work that was happening on I-80 “across the top” while that Fix50 project took place.
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mrsman

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Re: California
« Reply #1276 on: June 14, 2021, 07:36:32 PM »

Glad I am not driving in Sacto!  That is an ambitious schedule.  Hope it works!

Rick

Seeing as how that stretch of freeway opened 60 years ago this year -- and the pavement is pretty well trashed (particularly the ramps!), the decision to do it with one shot is a tradeoff between six days of inconvenience to local users or a protracted schedule of reconstruction with partial lane closures and numerous short detours.  Of course, the safety of the construction crews and those who would be driving on the freeway during "normal" spot-type construction would have been taken into consideration.  I would imagine that part of the decision process to do a complete shutdown was the presence of parallel I-5; longer-distance commercial movements that don't specify the east part of Elk Grove or Galt would simply shunt over to the Interstate via either CA 120 or CA 4 farther south and US 50 on the north.  Commuters to those same areas will be the most inconvenienced, but hopefully they received plenty of advance notice.  I think we're going to see more construction/reconstruction projects undertaken this way due to both time constraints and liability issues.   

I am inclined to agree.  Weighing the options of the typical weeks/months-long projects while keeping a route open vs taking a few days or a week of inconvenience and detours, I think that most people would gladly take the tradeoff and simply close the freeway for a few days.  With enough publicity, the traffic nightmares that many predict don't actually end up happening.  People find a way to adapt.
In my 22 years at Caltrans I have seen several of these major closures.  They have gone off pretty much without a hitch.  The massive amount of public outreach does make a difference.  Like the previous poster said, people listen and adjust.   If the W-X Fix50 bridge deck rebuild a few years ago was any indication, Caltrans will most likely halt the widening/reconstruction work that’s underway on I-5 while 99 is closed.  They shut down the widening/rehab work that was happening on I-80 “across the top” while that Fix50 project took place.

I think this is a bit of a trend in many areas to go with full closure, versus partial closures that would take months to accomplish a similar amount of work.  THe partial closures are also inefficient as they have to use some of their labor time to keep opening and closing the highway.  it is done for both highways and transit.  Yes, you can plan a closure for the right time to minimize disruption.  A true silver lining of COVID is that the lower traffic really enabled a boon to such construction projects, given traffic reduction.  But more generally, summer in most areas has enough of a lower traffic impact, since schools and colleges are closed, that you can generally do a closure like this without severe impact as well.  People can and often do schedule their vacation or WFH to coincide with such closures.

I now live in the DC area and pre-COVID, I would take the Metro to work.  A few years ago, there were several closures of my line to do some repair work.  One project was about seven weeks, so could not take vacation for the entire period, but enough people did for parts that it was indeed less crowded.  Shuttle buses were a pain, but for a short period, very manageable.  far better than single tracking which would mean that we'd still have delays (albeit less severe) for a much longer period of time.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: California
« Reply #1277 on: June 14, 2021, 07:55:12 PM »

Sorry for the incoming rant, but can anyone explain what the hell is going on around Mulholland and Kanan road area? Mulholland HWY has been closed at “The Snake” here for years: Dropped pin
https://goo.gl/maps/V5mDuSUcZfTsfZpe8

They’ve taken almost 3 years to replace a simple two lane bridge in a rural area and it still isn’t slated to be complete until late July.

Then there’s a pedestrian/hiking bridge that went out on a trail connecting the old M.A.S.H. set to Malibu Creek State main entrance. Haven’t heard from Caltrans or the county about why these things are taking forever to rebuild after the heavy rain intense fire seasons in 2018/2019 caused them to be fail.
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splashflash

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Re: California
« Reply #1278 on: June 16, 2021, 12:06:38 PM »

Upcoming construction project next week on Route 99 in Sacramento:

https://dot.ca.gov/caltrans-near-me/district-3/d3-projects/d3-sr-99-21st-avenue-undercrossing

Quote
Work Schedule/ Full Highway Closure Information
Caltrans is scheduled to close northbound and southbound State Route 99 from 47th Avenue to the U.S. Highway 50 Connector in Sacramento.

The four-day full highway closure is scheduled to begin 8:00 p.m., Friday, June 11, 2021 until 4:00 a.m., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.

Crews are also closing the mainline westbound Business 80/Capital City Freeway to southbound SR-99, and the westbound and eastbound US-50 connector ramps to southbound SR-99.

In addition, the following ramps are scheduled to be closed:

The on-ramp from 16th Street to eastbound US-50
The on-ramp from 29th Street/H Street to westbound Business 80/Capital City Freeway
The on-ramp from 29th Street/N Street to westbound Business 80/Capital City Freeway
The on-ramp from 29th Street/T Street to southbound SR-99
The on-ramp from Broadway to southbound SR-99
The off-ramp from southbound SR-99 to 12th Street
The off-ramp from northbound SR-99 to 12th Street
The on-ramp from 14th Avenue/30th Street to southbound SR-99
The on-ramp (slip) from Fruitridge Road to northbound SR-99
The on-ramp (loop) from Fruitridge Road to northbound SR-99
The on-ramp (slip) from East 47th Avenue to northbound SR-99
The on-ramp (loop) from West 47th Avenue to northbound SR-99

https://www.enr.com/articles/51917-caltrans-shaves-months-off-sr-99-repair-time-with-precast-prefab-girders

“We can fabricate the product offsite within a factory environment to strict specifications and the product will then be able to arrive on the jobsite in such a manner that it is able to take traffic loading immediately as opposed to having to cure onsite,” says Michael Hein, president of Con-Fab California.

The sections are trucked to the jobsite and installed with two crane crews. Once they are in place, the joints between them will be sealed off and ultra-high-performance concrete will be installed within the keyways to lock the pieces together, says Hein. Once that is done, a polyester concrete will be put on top to smooth out any edges.

Hein says his company worked on an $800,000 contract to fabricate the pieces in about a month. Once the sections were complete, his team put them together at the Con-Fab plant to fit before taking them to the actual project site, says Hein.

The FixSac99 bridge deck replacement is part of the SAC 99 21st Avenue Project, which includes replacing sound walls, the concrete median barrier, and installing brighter lighting for the 21st Street undercrossing.

Built in 1959, the 21st Avenue undercrossing was band widened in 1974. It currently has corrosion on the surface deck, concrete spalling, cracks, joint seals that need to be replaced, and the bridge deck has begun to deteriorate due to wear and tear from high traffic, weather and age. Caltrans says it is replacing the bridge deck before emergency operations are necessary.

Caltrans used a similar accelerated bridge construction method on the $14.1-million project that replaced the deteriorating Echo Summit Bridge on U.S. Highway 50 in El Dorado County.

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Bickendan

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Re: California
« Reply #1279 on: June 17, 2021, 03:11:10 AM »

I noted on my drive down US 101 through Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino Counties that a number of BGS had external exit tabs, very refreshing to see in California. And, of course, the windy Super-4 sections, notably along CA 271 and 254.
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