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Author Topic: I-49 in Northern Louisiana (Louisiana closes I-49 way too soon in cold weather.)  (Read 2568 times)

Rothman

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There is also the Cross Lake bridge. Two miles of bridge over Shreveport's main drinking water source...instantly tainted if a car or truck falls off the bridge and into the lake. No bueno.

They drink surface water in NE Louisiana?  Gross.  Surely they have some decent aquifers underneath them.  It is not an arid place, nor is the population so large as to overwhelm natural groundwater recharge.  I really hope that's wrong about Cross Lake.

Ever have tap water in New Orleans?
Yes.
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kphoger

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What's strange about a city's drinking water coming from a lake?  Wichita's water comes from Cheney Lake.  When I lived in southern Illinois, the drinking water came from Rend Lake.  Isn't this completely normal?
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snowc

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What's strange about a city's drinking water coming from a lake?  Wichita's water comes from Cheney Lake.  When I lived in southern Illinois, the drinking water came from Rend Lake.  Isn't this completely normal?
Ours come from a river, specifically the Cape Fear.
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MikieTimT

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What's strange about a city's drinking water coming from a lake?  Wichita's water comes from Cheney Lake.  When I lived in southern Illinois, the drinking water came from Rend Lake.  Isn't this completely normal?

It is.  Northwest Arkansas gets there's from Beaver Lake.  Not unusual for scuba divers to play around the dam.  Some lakes are cleaner than others, I guess, but almost every source needs treatment in pretty much any municiple water system, whether it comes from the ground or surface.  Only different is how much treatment is required to clean it to potable standards.
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Bobby5280

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Here in Lawton we get most of our water supply from Lake Lawtonka to the North of Lawton and Fort Sill. We also pump some water up from Waurika Lake. Much of the Dallas-Fort Worth metro gets its water from various lakes in the region, including Lake Texoma. The DFW metro's water demands are so bad that they've taken to filing law suits against cities in Oklahoma trying to claim their water supply, using the rationale that if any source of water can empty into the Red River that water source belongs to them. So they're trying to get dibs on Waurika Lake. Crazy.
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bwana39

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Here in Lawton we get most of our water supply from Lake Lawtonka to the North of Lawton and Fort Sill. We also pump some water up from Waurika Lake. Much of the Dallas-Fort Worth metro gets its water from various lakes in the region, including Lake Texoma. The DFW metro's water demands are so bad that they've taken to filing law suits against cities in Oklahoma trying to claim their water supply, using the rationale that if any source of water can empty into the Red River that water source belongs to them. So they're trying to get dibs on Waurika Lake. Crazy.

I want to defend Texas. The suits were filed because the Oklahoma Attorney General voided agreements between NTMWD and cities in Oklahoma who were willing to lease water rights. These leases were just short term and conveyed no rights beyond year to year contracts. If you don't need it, can we have it? If you need it, you can get it and NTMWD would have no claim.

I most cases these water contracts were just to capture the water before it reached the Red River or Lake Texoma. It was water that was  in large part already available to them once it reached Texoma. The water in Texoma has a moderately high salinity content and the water in the Washita before it enters Texoma has negligible salinity.

This takes us back to Cross Lake. There is more than enough water in the Red River to fulfill the needs of Shreveport it is just of too low a quality to use.

Most of Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas use surface water. Some of it is really gross. But even if the quantity in the aquifers were to be sufficient, the taste and quality might be as bad or worse than surface (lake) water
« Last Edit: March 22, 2021, 06:05:58 PM by bwana39 »
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triplemultiplex

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I tend to associate surface water use as a drinking water supply with either arid regions or areas of extremely high population.  (Or also, areas of very shallow, granitic bedrock.)  I'm so used to the Great Lakes region where all municipal drinking water is ground water except for cities on the Great Lakes themselves.  I figured a place like Shreveport which sits on top of thousands of feet of sedimentary layers and in a wet climate would have plenty of groundwater at their finger tips.  But I guess not.  Must be too much oil. :P
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jayhawkco

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Off topic, obviously, but most of Denver's comes from Lake Dillon.

Chris

GaryV

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I'm so used to the Great Lakes region where all municipal drinking water is ground water except for cities on the Great Lakes themselves. 
Not hardly.  Inland cities have pipelines running to the Lakes, for example Grand Rapids and Wyoming both have pipes to Lake Michigan.  Flint was using water from the Detroit system and was going to change to a new pipeline from Lake Huron.  The Detroit system covers over 1000 square miles and supplies water to more than 40% of Michigan's population.

Where the Great Lakes watershed line is very close to the lakes themselves - like in Wisconsin and in the Cleveland area - the pipelines are shorter, because of the agreement between the states and Ontario that no water can be shipped out of the basin.
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