When visiting a new state, what surprised you the most about the roads there?

Started by index, October 07, 2020, 04:10:32 PM

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kphoger

Along those lines...  I know Mexico doesn't count as a state, so I'll go with...  The first time I drove in Nayarit...

One thing that struck me was that, although the curve warning signs were quite similar to what I was used to in the USA (see Page 99 of this .pdf), there were no speed advisory tabs.  I quickly improved at judging the speed to take a curve at–a little-used skill on most highways in the USA.
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.


STLmapboy

Quote from: kphoger on October 13, 2020, 05:03:36 PM
Along those lines...  I know Mexico doesn't count as a state, so I'll go with...  The first time I drove in Nayarit...

One thing that struck me was that, although the curve warning signs were quite similar to what I was used to in the USA (see Page 99 of this .pdf), there were no speed advisory tabs.  I quickly improved at judging the speed to take a curve at–a little-used skill on most highways in the USA.
Where on the SCT's website do I find this Mexican MUTCD?
Teenage STL area roadgeek.
Missouri>>>>>Illinois

sprjus4

Years ago, seeing 75 mph speed limits on two-lane roads in Texas.

kphoger

Quote from: STLmapboy on October 13, 2020, 07:20:26 PM

Quote from: kphoger on October 13, 2020, 05:03:36 PM
Along those lines...  I know Mexico doesn't count as a state, so I'll go with...  The first time I drove in Nayarit...

One thing that struck me was that, although the curve warning signs were quite similar to what I was used to in the USA (see Page 99 of this .pdf), there were no speed advisory tabs.  I quickly improved at judging the speed to take a curve at–a little-used skill on most highways in the USA.

Where on the SCT's website do I find this Mexican MUTCD?

Various manuals, including the one I linked to, can be found here:
http://www.sct.gob.mx/carreteras/direccion-general-de-servicios-tecnicos/normativa/manuales/




Quote from: sprjus4 on October 13, 2020, 07:24:22 PM
Years ago, seeing 75 mph speed limits on two-lane roads in Texas.

Yes, I remember traveling through Texas during the 1990s, when speed limits across the country were being raised from 55/65.  I don't think any two-lane roads in Texas carried 75mph limits yet back then, but I do specifically remember seeing shoulder-less FM highways with 70mph limits.

Other Texas observations from back then:

–  Suburban highways tended to carry higher speed limits than comparable routes in other states.

–  Work zone speed limits were reasonably low, which–when coupled with higher regular speed limits–reinforced their importance.

–  Texas was the first place I witnessed vehicles riding the shoulder to let faster traffic pass down the centerline (Mexican style).

–  A lot of apparently chip-and-seal pavement, but very few roads that were actually rough.  Preferable to smooth pavement with big bumps and cracks.

–  FM and RM highways provided useful bypasses of towns–e.g., this bypass of Odessa using FM-866.
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

epzik8

From the land of red, white, yellow and black.
____________________________

My clinched highways: http://tm.teresco.org/user/?u=epzik8
My clinched counties: http://mob-rule.com/user-gifs/USA/epzik8.gif

kphoger

Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

sprjus4

Quote from: kphoger on October 14, 2020, 09:54:46 AM
Quote from: STLmapboy on October 13, 2020, 07:20:26 PM

Quote from: kphoger on October 13, 2020, 05:03:36 PM
Along those lines...  I know Mexico doesn't count as a state, so I'll go with...  The first time I drove in Nayarit...

One thing that struck me was that, although the curve warning signs were quite similar to what I was used to in the USA (see Page 99 of this .pdf), there were no speed advisory tabs.  I quickly improved at judging the speed to take a curve at–a little-used skill on most highways in the USA.

Where on the SCT's website do I find this Mexican MUTCD?

Various manuals, including the one I linked to, can be found here:
http://www.sct.gob.mx/carreteras/direccion-general-de-servicios-tecnicos/normativa/manuales/




Quote from: sprjus4 on October 13, 2020, 07:24:22 PM
Years ago, seeing 75 mph speed limits on two-lane roads in Texas.

Yes, I remember traveling through Texas during the 1990s, when speed limits across the country were being raised from 55/65.  I don't think any two-lane roads in Texas carried 75mph limits yet back then, but I do specifically remember seeing shoulder-less FM highways with 70mph limits.

Other Texas observations from back then:

–  Suburban highways tended to carry higher speed limits than comparable routes in other states.

–  Work zone speed limits were reasonably low, which–when coupled with higher regular speed limits–reinforced their importance.

–  Texas was the first place I witnessed vehicles riding the shoulder to let faster traffic pass down the centerline (Mexican style).

–  A lot of apparently chip-and-seal pavement, but very few roads that were actually rough.  Preferable to smooth pavement with big bumps and cracks.

–  FM and RM highways provided useful bypasses of towns–e.g., this bypass of Odessa using FM-866.
IIRC, 75 mph speed limits were not introduced in the state until around 2011. Before then, 70 mph speed limits would've been the maximum posted on all highways, with the exception of 80 mph zones that were approved a few years before that still remain on I-10 and I-20.

NWI_Irish96

What surprised me the first time I left Indiana was that not every state numbers its state highways on a grid.
Indiana: counties 100%, highways 100%
Illinois: counties 100%, highways 61%
Michigan: counties 100%, highways 56%
Wisconsin: counties 86%, highways 23%

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: kphoger on October 13, 2020, 05:03:36 PM
Along those lines...  I know Mexico doesn't count as a state, so I'll go with...  The first time I drove in Nayarit...

One thing that struck me was that, although the curve warning signs were quite similar to what I was used to in the USA (see Page 99 of this .pdf), there were no speed advisory tabs.  I quickly improved at judging the speed to take a curve at–a little-used skill on most highways in the USA.

Speaking of curve advisories the first time I revisited California as a driver I noticed that they often aren't even there on a lot of state and local roads.  That was really a surprising contrast to Arizona which over posts recommend curve speed signs. 

zachary_amaryllis

for me, it was the 'michigan left' when i visited muskegon.

turned left at a light and my friend looked at me like he expected a bird to leap out of my head on a small spring.

there's benefits and disadvantages on both sides, i imagine...
clinched:
I-64, I-80, I-76 (west), *64s in hampton roads, 225,270,180 (co, wy)

webny99

Something that has surprised me about PA in general: the truck traffic!

In NY I can probably count on one or two hands the number of important non-freeway truck routes. In PA, though, seemingly every state route has heavy truck traffic whizzing by. It's been most noticeable to me south and east of Harrisburg and in the Altoona area, although you also have US 219, US 220, two lane portions of US 15 and US 322, etc.

Eth

The first time I left Georgia via freeway, entering South Carolina in 1994:

"What's with the extra-thick text on the exit signs here?"

kennyshark64

Some observations from over the years (and even as a kid, I was a very observant roadgeek).

Ohio (1970s) - Button copy & lighted BGS's

St. Louis (early '70s) - Black BGS's on the freeways

Georgia & Florida ('80s at the time) - Sequential-based exit numbers (since changed to mileage-based).  This was very demoralizing on long trips.

Pennsylvania - Tubular posts instead of traditional gantries.  Not a big fan.  Now those darned things have made there way into Ohio.

Honorable mention - Ontario-BGS's in the GTA ('80s before they became bilingual signs) having extremely large letters (i.e. "401 WEST" and "427 NORTH").

STLmapboy

Teenage STL area roadgeek.
Missouri>>>>>Illinois

Brian556

For me, it would have to be the colored US Highway shields in Florida (Early 90's)

Tom958

Taking I-20 through Mississippi for the first time in 2015, I was pleasantly surprised by how many bridge designs were in evidence. It's almost as impressive as Tennessee in that regard and a most welcome change after boring ol' Alabama. My travels there are still sparse, but I really like their ways of doing things.



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