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Truck speed limits: a moderately hateful thread.

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Hobart:
On my trip to North Dakota last month, my dad and I noticed that there weren't any truck speed limits. For context, we live in Illinois, and the regular speed limit is 70 with trucks being stuck at 60 or 65. In North Dakota, trucks are allowed to drive 75.

My dad had an explanation, "It's because, unlike dumbass Illinois, they realize that it's good to have traffic moving at the same speed." Now, my dad isn't a huge fan of Illinois, but he does have a good point.

A car traveling five miles an hour under the speed limit is known to cause more accidents than a car going five above. What benefit is there to having a requirement for a quarter of vehicles on the road to go five or more under the speed limit?

jeffandnicole:

--- Quote from: Hobart on September 18, 2021, 11:00:20 PM ---On my trip to North Dakota last month, my dad and I noticed that there weren't any truck speed limits. For context, we live in Illinois, and the regular speed limit is 70 with trucks being stuck at 60 or 65. In North Dakota, trucks are allowed to drive 75.

My dad had an explanation, "It's because, unlike dumbass Illinois, they realize that it's good to have traffic moving at the same speed." Now, my dad isn't a huge fan of Illinois, but he does have a good point.

A car traveling five miles an hour under the speed limit is known to cause more accidents than a car going five above. What benefit is there to having a requirement for a quarter of vehicles on the road to go five or more under the speed limit?

--- End quote ---

There isn't, which is why most states have eliminated split speed limits.

Scott5114:
A truck has greater mass and therefore, more kinetic energy than a car going the same speed [KE = (m v2) 2]. Thus, if a truck gets in a wreck, the force exerted on whatever it hits will be greater, so it should be kept at a lower speed to likewise reduce the kinetic energy.

That's the theory, anyway. As your dad mentioned, keeping all vehicles around the same speed tends to reduce the number of wrecks, so the amount of force exerted by a truck crashing into something becomes irrelevant.

bwana39:

--- Quote from: Hobart on September 18, 2021, 11:00:20 PM ---On my trip to North Dakota last month, my dad and I noticed that there weren't any truck speed limits. For context, we live in Illinois, and the regular speed limit is 70 with trucks being stuck at 60 or 65. In North Dakota, trucks are allowed to drive 75.

My dad had an explanation, "It's because, unlike dumbass Illinois, they realize that it's good to have traffic moving at the same speed." Now, my dad isn't a huge fan of Illinois, but he does have a good point.

A car traveling five miles an hour under the speed limit is known to cause more accidents than a car going five above. What benefit is there to having a requirement for a quarter of vehicles on the road to go five or more under the speed limit?

--- End quote ---


As a GENERAL rule the tickets threshold is the same for both. By that I mean generally 8 to 10 mph above the higher of the two. What this actually means for trucks is a bigger ticket for the same speed as the car driver.

Max Rockatansky:
It never seemed be a problem passing trucks at 75 MPH in Arizona or 80 MPH in Nevada.  The 55 MPH speed limit for trucks in California is largely universally ignored.

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