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Noticed the Street Grid in Kansas

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roadman65:
https://www.ksdot.org/Assets/wwwksdotorg/bureaus/burTransPlan/maps/county-pdf/butler.PDF
If you look at KDOTís map of Butler County, KS you will see how all the county roads are set off in a perfect grid. All running N-S and E-W and each one having set distances between them and all blocks square in rural areas.

Reno County nearby and Sedgwick is the same.

Most states donít bother in rural areas to have a street grid layout. In fact property owners have to pay to build their own roads. Yet some Kansas Counties have and usually have four parcels of land in each square of even acres.

Interesting.

FrCorySticha:
Looks like the standard section grid of 640 acres, which is 1 mile square. These sections are often subdivided into quarters of 160 acres, hence the four parcels of land. Lots of other midwestern and western states use the same grid, though section line roads are often abandoned in less populous areas.

EDIT: As I look closer, it is a standard section grid with townships. Within each section is a number that counts between 1 and 36, and township identifiers "T # E" and "R # S" based off the meridians and baselines. So, if you owned land near Whitewater, KS, the deed would include whatever quarter and possibly quarter of a quarter within "S18, T24S R3E". More info from Wiki

It was not uncommon for the counties to establish roads along the section lines. However, as I stated above, many became abandoned as homesteads merged into larger farms.

NE2:
Florida does the same...

Scott5114:

--- Quote from: roadman65 on September 25, 2021, 09:49:52 AM ---Most states donít bother in rural areas to have a street grid layout. In fact property owners have to pay to build their own roads. Yet some Kansas Counties have and usually have four parcels of land in each square of even acres.

--- End quote ---

That's not true at all. Most states in this part of the country do this. Oklahoma is the same way.

skluth:
You will find county-wide grids are in most places beyond the original 13 states. (Maine and Vermont which were claimed by other states don't have county grids either.) Exceptions are mostly settlements like Green Bay, St Louis, and New Orleans are examples where the original founders were French and the old roads follow the French Long Lot system. Once away from long lots, the grid concept first laid out by the Northwest Ordinance bills can be found over most of the rest of the US.

The basics of the Northwest Ordinances should have been taught in your junior high Civics class. It was in mine, but I'm retired so maybe this important info was dropped from modern curriculums.

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