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Author Topic: British Columbia's Highways  (Read 13519 times)

splashflash

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #50 on: November 27, 2021, 01:29:42 AM »

Some news from the recent flooding in B.C.:

This means that Highway 3 (Hope to Princeton) is the only way in and out of the Lower Mainland by truck. This road is not designed for heavy, high-speed traffic. It goes over two high passes and has difficult winter driving conditions. More severe weather is forecast over the next few days.

The Hope-Princeton was rebuilt together on the west end together with construction of the Coquihalla for Expo 86. The approx 35km from Hope to Manning Park entrance is good 4 lane but un-divided highway.  I believe the straightening and addition of passing lanes near Sunday Summit completed a few years ago was the only significant work since 1986.  The highway receives less snow than the Coquihalla or even Stevens Pass on US 2 to the south. 

Before the Coquihalla opened I can remember huge platoons of vehicles, but that largely disappeared after the Coq opened.  For a long time this was the fastest route from the Coast to Okanagan cities from Vernon south.

There are some steep grades near Sunshine Valley and west of Princeton.  The rest of the Crowsnest should see an uptick of traffic volume but also some steep grades at Anarchist Mountain, the Salmo-Creston, and Bonanza Pass.
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Dougtone

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #51 on: November 27, 2021, 05:06:50 AM »

From what I am reading, the timeline for reopening BC 5 (Coquihalla Highway) to traffic will be sometime in January, even though there will be reduced capacity while they continue to make repairs.

https://www.kelownanow.com/watercooler/news/news/BC_Interior/Daunting_task_20_sites_5_bridges_on_the_Coquihalla_heavily_damaged_or_washed_away/#fs_105587

AsphaltPlanet

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #52 on: December 16, 2021, 10:16:49 PM »

Updated aerial photography of Highway 8 between Spences Bridge and Merritt.

This highway was pretty much completely destroyed by the flooding:
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Bruce

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #53 on: December 17, 2021, 01:50:38 AM »

The Coq (Highway 5) will reopen to commercial traffic on December 20, about a month ahead of schedule. Not a full freeway like before and with reduced speed limits.

https://globalnews.ca/news/8453299/coquihalla-highway-reopening-timeline-update/

Highway 3 will be opened for limited non-essential travel as well, thanks to this.

kkt

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #54 on: December 17, 2021, 01:57:12 AM »

Wow, the deserve some congratulations!
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splashflash

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #55 on: December 17, 2021, 07:22:59 AM »

Updated aerial photography of Highway 8 between Spences Bridge and Merritt.

This highway was pretty much completely destroyed by the flooding:

Thanks for this.  The northwestern section was the windiest and incurred the bulk of the damage.  Perhaps a new route along a logging road through to the Nicoamen Peninsula would be better.
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AsphaltPlanet

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #56 on: December 17, 2021, 10:37:52 AM »

There is a guy who has been chronicling the reconstruction of the Coq:

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AsphaltPlanet

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #57 on: December 20, 2021, 01:55:06 PM »

The Coq is open (to commercial traffic):

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kkt

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #58 on: December 20, 2021, 06:48:33 PM »

 :clap:
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Bruce

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #59 on: January 18, 2022, 10:26:25 PM »

The Coquihalla Highway has now reopened to all traffic, but is still not a full freeway.

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/coquihalla-highway-reopens-to-regular-traffic-b-c-state-of-emergency-ends

Kniwt

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #60 on: February 05, 2022, 07:24:46 PM »

The CBC has a long report, with lots of photos and video, showing how the Coquihalla Highway (BC 5) was reopened after November's storm.
https://www.cbc.ca/newsinteractives/features/coquihalla-repaired-35-days

Quote
B.C.’s transportation minister Rob Fleming described the Dec. 20, 2021, reopening of the highway to commercial traffic and buses as “one of the most remarkable engineering feats in recent memory in the province of British Columbia.”

... The cost of the temporary repairs required to reopen the Coquihalla, also known as Highway 5, was between about $45 million and $55 million, according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

It took more than 300 workers and 200 pieces of equipment 35 days to reopen the highway.

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Alps

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #61 on: February 06, 2022, 11:20:53 AM »

The CBC has a long report, with lots of photos and video, showing how the Coquihalla Highway (BC 5) was reopened after November's storm.
https://www.cbc.ca/newsinteractives/features/coquihalla-repaired-35-days

Quote
B.C.’s transportation minister Rob Fleming described the Dec. 20, 2021, reopening of the highway to commercial traffic and buses as “one of the most remarkable engineering feats in recent memory in the province of British Columbia.”

... The cost of the temporary repairs required to reopen the Coquihalla, also known as Highway 5, was between about $45 million and $55 million, according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

It took more than 300 workers and 200 pieces of equipment 35 days to reopen the highway.


https://goo.gl/maps/23r79yFU8UT8e6wYA

Bruce

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #62 on: March 25, 2022, 06:36:12 PM »

North end of the Granville Bridge will look a bit different by next year: the northern loops will be demolished to make way for development.

jakeroot

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #63 on: March 25, 2022, 07:23:29 PM »

North end of the Granville Bridge will look a bit different by next year: the northern loops will be demolished to make way for development.

[clipped]

Definitely a bit overdue. I don't think it's imperative to improve Drake St for traffic coming off the bridge, but I would imagine it may be worth installing an advanced left turn from Drake onto the bridge, as I think that will be the main access route for traffic from Pacific; going around via Hornby and Drake may clog up quick with the change to protected right turn phasing due to improvements to the cycle path along Hornby.

Edit: never mind, looks like Drake is being converted to one-way. Didn't know that. Perhaps they can add the advanced left turn at Davie and Granville instead. Traffic travelling beyond Davie likely isn't trying to access the Granville Bridge, so no reason to make large-scale changes besides that.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2022, 07:27:57 PM by jakeroot »
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andrepoiy

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #64 on: June 06, 2022, 05:30:42 PM »

I just visited the Vancouver Area + Southern Vancouver Island for a week.

Man, as someone from Ontario, I find that BC roads are so... strange.

For routing:

Going up and down Highway 99 to Whistler, why isn't this at least RIRO? It seems like this corridor is busy enough/unsafe enough to at least warrant that. Same for Highway 1 on Vancouver Island between Victoria and Nanaimo, and Highway 17 between the ferry and Victoria.

Lions Gate Bridge - why is there no direct connection to Hwy 1? On the other end, it becomes West Georgia Street, which was so slow. Perhaps it might be better if this end was routed onto a one-way pair?? The Howe/Seymour combination that Highway 99 later becomes, I found to be a lot quicker in the same distance.

Highway 99 in Richmond - why isn't there an exit at Blundell Road?

Following Highway 99 in Vancouver during rush hour on Granville Street was so slow. Jesus. And the part of 99 that goes on West 70th Street to get to the bridge took me 20 minutes. For a distance of 700m. Insane.

For road design:

The turn arrows to me look weird, like they were drawn by kids...
Some signs are also strange (such as a "MERGE" sign as opposed to just, using the pictoral sign of a lane ending)
And don't get me started on the traffic signals!! Why do the signals on the side look rather neglected (with no backplates), and why are they 8-8-8-12???? Ahhhhhh


Some things I did find interesting though:

The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

The extensive use of pedestrian crossovers (flashing green lights). I guess it's good for the thru traffic to flow more efficiently, as in Ontario those same intersections would just be a regular light config, and therefore a lot of time wasted to stop thru traffic for 1 car.

Highway 4 to Tofino had "slow vehicle pullouts" which seems to be a good idea for areas where the ROW would be too narrow to get passing lanes. Not to mention the signs directing slow vehicles to pull out were black-on-white regulatory signs, and not suggestions. Ontario should take note.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2022, 05:48:45 PM by andrepoiy »
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Bruce

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #65 on: June 06, 2022, 05:58:44 PM »

The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

Becoming increasingly common down south as well, mostly in cases where the traffic signal may be obstructed by a hill or curve.

Highway 4 to Tofino had "slow vehicle pullouts" which seems to be a good idea for areas where the ROW would be too narrow to get passing lanes. Not to mention the signs directing slow vehicles to pull out were black-on-white regulatory signs, and not suggestions. Ontario should take note.

Common all over the Northwest, with Washington mandating any vehicle holding up 5 others to use them, on top of normal courtesy. It generally does work, but all it takes are idiots in U-Hauls on mountain roads to gum it up.

Stephane Dumas

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #66 on: June 06, 2022, 06:33:29 PM »


The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

Quebec also use a variant for some railroad crossings.

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cbeach40

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #67 on: June 07, 2022, 10:28:07 AM »

Some things I did find interesting though:

The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

We've had them for decades:
https://goo.gl/maps/p9gvQ72UU78DF3qZ7
https://goo.gl/maps/BTfNj5ANQvfJ33hp7


The extensive use of pedestrian crossovers (flashing green lights). I guess it's good for the thru traffic to flow more efficiently, as in Ontario those same intersections would just be a regular light config, and therefore a lot of time wasted to stop thru traffic for 1 car.

That's just false. Traffic signal justification are based on volume warrants, which is necessary to prioritize them as signals are surprisingly expensive. Pedestrian signals and pedestrian crossovers (ie, crosswalks) are what we use here in those situations.

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jakeroot

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #68 on: June 07, 2022, 12:01:52 PM »

The extensive use of pedestrian crossovers (flashing green lights). I guess it's good for the thru traffic to flow more efficiently, as in Ontario those same intersections would just be a regular light config, and therefore a lot of time wasted to stop thru traffic for 1 car.

That's just false. Traffic signal justification are based on volume warrants, which is necessary to prioritize them as signals are surprisingly expensive. Pedestrian signals and pedestrian crossovers (ie, crosswalks) are what we use here in those situations.

I don't think you understood what he was saying. The flashing green pedestrian signals in British Columbia respond only to pedestrian activation. Cars approaching from the side only have a stop sign, so they can go the moment it is clear. With a regular traffic light, they would have to wait for a green light. Which is annoying for only one car. Typically they are used at intersections where there is more foot traffic than car traffic, a common situation in many parts of Metro Vancouver.

For road design:

The turn arrows to me look weird, like they were drawn by kids...
Some signs are also strange (such as a "MERGE" sign as opposed to just, using the pictoral sign of a lane ending)
And don't get me started on the traffic signals!! Why do the signals on the side look rather neglected (with no backplates), and why are they 8-8-8-12???? Ahhhhhh

The arrows in British Columbia are not completely unique to BC. They are also used in WA, by a few cities. I've always preferred them simply because I find them easier to comprehend.

I do not understand the MERGE sign either. So many symbols and yet they write that one out. Weird.

Some cities in BC use backplates on all signals. Richmond comes to mind. I wouldn't call the overall design neglected. Backplates are not really needed on post-mounted signals, especially the height they are used in British Columbia, which is lower than most places (equal to pedestrian signal heads rather than above them) so they are not in the sun for the most part. The use of 200mm signals is officially history, as the MOTI changed their manual to require all signals to be 300mm. I quite like the smaller heads, as they had a sort of "boutique" feeling to them (I guess, less imposing?), but no doubt that they should all be 300mm these days.

As a side-note: at least British Columbia uses post-mounted signals, unlike a certain other province (*cough* Ontario).
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andrepoiy

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #69 on: June 07, 2022, 01:00:54 PM »

Some things I did find interesting though:

The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

We've had them for decades:
https://goo.gl/maps/p9gvQ72UU78DF3qZ7
https://goo.gl/maps/BTfNj5ANQvfJ33hp7


True, but they're tiny as opposed to the gantries used in BC
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andrepoiy

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #70 on: June 07, 2022, 01:07:58 PM »

For road design:

The turn arrows to me look weird, like they were drawn by kids...
Some signs are also strange (such as a "MERGE" sign as opposed to just, using the pictoral sign of a lane ending)
And don't get me started on the traffic signals!! Why do the signals on the side look rather neglected (with no backplates), and why are they 8-8-8-12???? Ahhhhhh

The arrows in British Columbia are not completely unique to BC. They are also used in WA, by a few cities. I've always preferred them simply because I find them easier to comprehend.

I do not understand the MERGE sign either. So many symbols and yet they write that one out. Weird.

Some cities in BC use backplates on all signals. Richmond comes to mind. I wouldn't call the overall design neglected. Backplates are not really needed on post-mounted signals, especially the height they are used in British Columbia, which is lower than most places (equal to pedestrian signal heads rather than above them) so they are not in the sun for the most part. The use of 200mm signals is officially history, as the MOTI changed their manual to require all signals to be 300mm. I quite like the smaller heads, as they had a sort of "boutique" feeling to them (I guess, less imposing?), but no doubt that they should all be 300mm these days.

As a side-note: at least British Columbia uses post-mounted signals, unlike a certain other province (*cough* Ontario).

Fair enough. I guess that as an Ontarian, where pretty much every signal has backplates, seeing no backplates is just weird in itself. And 8-8-8 signals are all but gone.

Also: How do they determine which side the side signal is on? Sometimes they're on the left, sometimes on the right, sometimes both?? In the same vein, how do they determine the # of signals on the top as well? Sometimes there's 1, sometimes there's 2...

Ontario does have post-mounted signals in certain situations, but yeah personally I still prefer how Ontario does them. I think it's just more aesthetically pleasing than one gigantic thick post.

« Last Edit: June 07, 2022, 01:14:42 PM by andrepoiy »
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jakeroot

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #71 on: June 07, 2022, 01:33:14 PM »

Some things I did find interesting though:

The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

We've had them for decades:
https://goo.gl/maps/p9gvQ72UU78DF3qZ7
https://goo.gl/maps/BTfNj5ANQvfJ33hp7


True, but they're tiny as opposed to the gantries used in BC

They are also used at every signalized intersection in BC with an approach speed of 70 km/h or greater. I'm not aware of any other agency in North America with such requirements.

Fair enough. I guess that as an Ontarian, where pretty much every signal has backplates, seeing no backplates is just weird in itself. And 8-8-8 signals are all but gone.

Ontario does have post-mounted signals in certain situations, but yeah personally I still prefer how Ontario does them. I think it's just more aesthetically pleasing than one gigantic thick post.



BC does deserve credit for consistency, though. Primary signals (overhead signals and post-mounted left turn signals) always have backplates, just like in Ontario, whereas post-mounted signals (secondary and tertiary/auxiliary signals) almost never do. And that's the case at probably 95% of intersections in BC.

But that gets back to my point a little bit: overhead signals in BC look pretty much like those in Ontario: all yellow backplate and often all-yellow signals (sometimes), the only difference is that the typical BC intersection will also have a secondary signal mounted on the far left corner, and usually another on the far right corner. And yes, the mast arm is a bit longer, but BC also opts to use a separate mast arm or no mast arm at all for left turn signals, so the mast arm is often shorter. The requirement for secondary and tertiary signals also helps for redundancy, in the event that one of the signals is blocked by a tall vehicle. In Ontario, the signals in your picture could easily be blocked by a tall vehicle, but the post-mounted signals like those in my picture below would likely still be visible.


Signalized intersection, BC by Jacob Root, on Flickr
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andrepoiy

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #72 on: June 08, 2022, 01:59:11 PM »

I see yeah, that's true.
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cbeach40

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #73 on: June 09, 2022, 02:37:39 PM »

The extensive use of pedestrian crossovers (flashing green lights). I guess it's good for the thru traffic to flow more efficiently, as in Ontario those same intersections would just be a regular light config, and therefore a lot of time wasted to stop thru traffic for 1 car.

That's just false. Traffic signal justification are based on volume warrants, which is necessary to prioritize them as signals are surprisingly expensive. Pedestrian signals and pedestrian crossovers (ie, crosswalks) are what we use here in those situations.

I don't think you understood what he was saying. The flashing green pedestrian signals in British Columbia respond only to pedestrian activation. Cars approaching from the side only have a stop sign, so they can go the moment it is clear. With a regular traffic light, they would have to wait for a green light. Which is annoying for only one car. Typically they are used at intersections where there is more foot traffic than car traffic, a common situation in many parts of Metro Vancouver.

No, I understood perfectly what was being described there. And included links to two Ontario examples of precisely that, where an IPS or PXO are located at a side street under stop control.

I'll just pop them out here for clarity. Actually going to change the Streetview angle so it's a little clearer. :)
https://goo.gl/maps/PWL8HJCDeWLbgrYW8
https://goo.gl/maps/K3b1B32cmstS6cxF6


We've had them for decades:
https://goo.gl/maps/p9gvQ72UU78DF3qZ7
https://goo.gl/maps/BTfNj5ANQvfJ33hp7


True, but they're tiny as opposed to the gantries used in BC

Are you referring to these? As those are actually slightly smaller than those examples I provided. I will grant though that overhead placement does make them more conspicuous. There's these examples that are, believe it or not, about 50% larger than that BC one:

https://goo.gl/maps/MVj1e31nWr516em78
https://goo.gl/maps/jmru7Fvg1NJcDn5R7

I actually really like the Waterloo Region one, as it's big and overhead but retains the distinctive diamond shape rather than just printed on a rectangular background.


Not trying to be insulting or anything with this. I've done traffic engineering work all around the province so I have to know the OTM like the back of my hand and knew offhand where all of these were.

I think the main point though, that this sort of sign could be applied, or at least applied more in Ontario. Definitely agree on that.
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andrepoiy

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Re: British Columbia's Highways
« Reply #74 on: June 09, 2022, 10:26:35 PM »

Interesting. I had never been to Thunder Bay, and the Kitchener one I just never noticed.
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