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101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows Projects

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TheStranger:

--- Quote from: nexus73 on September 04, 2014, 04:33:47 PM ---Taking 15 years to twiddle thumbs would draw a head-chopping of those assigned to a project if I ran things, then adding another 15 years to build a couple of tunnels with their accompanying bridges and a bit of roadway shows how ridiculous the whole process is.  If we had built the Alcan Highway with all the present rigamarole we would all be speaking Japanese over here on the West Coast.  Instead it was "git 'er done" time and the entire route was finished in less than a year.  Yet another reason to call the adults of that time "The Greatest Generation".
--- End quote ---

As much as I am gung ho on road projects (ESPECIALLY because of the red tape and obstacles that those now face here in California), I also am cognizant of what gets in the way of quick completion:

- EIRs
- protest from locals (i.e. 1950s-present South Pasadena) and outsiders (Willits bypass, which seems to be supported locally over there, but due to an environmental dispute has been the target of several oppositional news pieces from the ABC affiliate in SF)
- lack of budget

Very different atmosphere from the highway-construction boom of the 1940s-1960s.

kkt:
What you're seeing on the California north coast is not Caltrans being slow, it's a deeply divided population.  Some of them want better access for more shipping, more tourists, etc.  But a lot want to stay a country backwater, and the price for that is slow roads and traffic delays to the big cities.  It's hard to say either side is wrong.

MaxConcrete:

--- Quote from: relaxok on September 03, 2014, 01:05:35 AM ---I cannot believe that this section of highway has been neglected for so long, especially in an area with so much money and so much desperate need for expanding the commuter corridor of San Francisco.

--- End quote ---

It seems to me that California should be making greater use of toll roads for critical projects which can't get funded. If it is going to take 20 to 30 years for certain projects to be built, you could potentially get the road built and paid for in that same time period, ultimately making it a free road in the same amount of time. For example, the Route 152 project near San Jose would be a good candidate.

I don't like toll roads, which is especially painful because I'm in Texas which is being transformed into the toll road capital of America. I wouldn't wish that future on any other state.

But toll roads can be part of a solution plan for chronic congestion. In addition, it is easier to get toll roads built because
1. They don't use traditional public funds, which make it more difficult for political opposition to block the project
2. Opposition is less intense because the opposition likes the fact that motorists using the highway are paying for the privilege
3. Surplus revenue can be used and abused by politicians, which gives politicians more incentive to get it built. (Unfortunately, toll road revenue is abused in both Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth, and the New York/New Jersey area is legendary for diverting toll revenue.)

For example, look at state route 73 in Orange County or the Inter-County connector in Maryland, projects which were nearly miracles to actually get built and could only be done as toll roads.

relaxok:
A significant amount of work on this project has been done.  They've made a frontage road across most of this distance and rebuilt several bridges.  It looks like they have eliminated most of the not up-to-freeway-standards exits too, other than the very first one by the gas station south of Petaluma.  I wonder how many more years before it'll be fully freeway and can get federal funds.  They have widened a few miles north from Novato in the NB direction but it really needs 3 lanes between Novato and Petaluma in both directions.

Meanwhile the SMART train is on target and very far along.  It will be interesting to see if it clears up some traffic.

DeaconG:

--- Quote from: MaxConcrete on September 06, 2014, 03:10:38 PM ---
--- Quote from: relaxok on September 03, 2014, 01:05:35 AM ---I cannot believe that this section of highway has been neglected for so long, especially in an area with so much money and so much desperate need for expanding the commuter corridor of San Francisco.

--- End quote ---

It seems to me that California should be making greater use of toll roads for critical projects which can't get funded. If it is going to take 20 to 30 years for certain projects to be built, you could potentially get the road built and paid for in that same time period, ultimately making it a free road in the same amount of time. For example, the Route 152 project near San Jose would be a good candidate.

I don't like toll roads, which is especially painful because I'm in Texas which is being transformed into the toll road capital of America. I wouldn't wish that future on any other state.

But toll roads can be part of a solution plan for chronic congestion. In addition, it is easier to get toll roads built because
1. They don't use traditional public funds, which make it more difficult for political opposition to block the project
2. Opposition is less intense because the opposition likes the fact that motorists using the highway are paying for the privilege
3. Surplus revenue can be used and abused by politicians, which gives politicians more incentive to get it built. (Unfortunately, toll road revenue is abused in both Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth, and the New York/New Jersey area is legendary for diverting toll revenue.)

For example, look at state route 73 in Orange County or the Inter-County connector in Maryland, projects which were nearly miracles to actually get built and could only be done as toll roads.

--- End quote ---

Texas may be the toll road capital but Florida is catching up quick...

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