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Kentucky

Started by NE2, April 22, 2011, 07:29:44 PM

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roadman65

Is the Livermore Bridge on US 431 really the only bridge of any crossing to cross two rivers and briefly enter another county before returning to the county of origin?

I would think some other crossing would do something like this.
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe


hbelkins

Quote from: roadman65 on June 04, 2024, 12:23:29 AMIs the Livermore Bridge on US 431 really the only bridge of any crossing to cross two rivers and briefly enter another county before returning to the county of origin?

I would think some other crossing would do something like this.

Not sure about the two counties deal, but the bridge between Louisa, Ky., and Fort Gay, WV, crosses two rivers -- the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River and the Levisa Fork of the Big Sandy River, with a "leg" extending down to the point where the two rivers meet (KY 3).

If I'm not mistaken, the Livermore bridge crosses the Green and Rough rivers at the mouth of the Rough.


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

jnewkirk77

Quote from: hbelkins on June 04, 2024, 04:29:46 PM
Quote from: roadman65 on June 04, 2024, 12:23:29 AMIs the Livermore Bridge on US 431 really the only bridge of any crossing to cross two rivers and briefly enter another county before returning to the county of origin?

I would think some other crossing would do something like this.

Not sure about the two counties deal, but the bridge between Louisa, Ky., and Fort Gay, WV, crosses two rivers -- the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River and the Levisa Fork of the Big Sandy River, with a "leg" extending down to the point where the two rivers meet (KY 3).

If I'm not mistaken, the Livermore bridge crosses the Green and Rough rivers at the mouth of the Rough.

That's right.

For historical perspective, this bridge opened about 2 months after the Glover Cary Bridge at Owensboro. Likewise, it was a toll bridge, but it was paid off 8 years ahead of the longer Owensboro span. Tolls were lifted at Livermore in 1946, and in Owensboro in 1954.

As far as I can find, it really still is, after 84 years, still the only bridge that crosses two rivers, starts in one county, crosses a second and returns to the one it left.

seicer

Final Report for U.S. 60 Connectivity Study Recommends Advancing U.S. 51 Bridge Replacement Project
Cost, environmental impacts, public feedback inform decision not to advance new corridor project
PADUCAH Ky. (June 13, 2024) – As part of Team Kentucky's commitment to provide safe, environmentally sound and fiscally responsible roadways, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) has released the final U.S. 60 Connectivity Study report that recommends advancing the U.S. 51 Bridge Replacement project, which has widespread support, a lower cost and fewer environmental impacts than the U.S. 60 corridor project.
The U.S. 60 Connectivity Study was a more than yearlong, comprehensive evaluation that examined the feasibility of constructing a new U.S. 60 corridor and Ohio River bridge crossing between Barlow, Kentucky, and Interstate Highway 57 near Future City, Illinois. The study's goal was to determine if the new U.S. 60 corridor and a relocated river crossing would offer more long-term value to the commonwealth and the traveling public than the proposed U.S. 51 Bridge Replacement project at Cairo, Illinois.
"We know that the existing U.S. 51 bridge is nearing the end of its useful life, and we want to find the best solution to construct a new Ohio River crossing for the region," said Kyle Poat, Chief District Engineer, KYTC District 1. "This study was conducted as part of our duty to Kentuckians, to examine the potential benefits and impacts of a new route and crossing — and the findings are clear: The cost and environmental impacts of a new U.S. 60 corridor and crossing outweigh the benefits."
The U.S. 60 Connectivity Study launched in early 2023 and included thorough cost, environmental, socioeconomic and traffic analysis. Public involvement along with local, state and national resource agency coordination and input were also important components to the study that helped inform a final recommendation. Public meetings were held in LaCenter, Kentucky and Cairo, Illinois, to gather public feedback, followed by a monthlong comment period.
Most areas of analysis and feedback did not support advancing the project, including:
  • Cost: It would cost an estimated $1.3 billion to construct the U.S. 60 Connectivity Study project versus $450 million to construct the U.S .51 Bridge Replacement project.
  • Environmental impacts and timeline: The U.S. 60 Connectivity Study would impact a wide range of wetlands, endangered wildlife and protected public lands that would require the highest level of federally mandated environmental assessment, resulting in a rigorous, multiyear process. Meanwhile, the U.S. 51 Bridge Replacement has already received federal environmental approval and can be ready to proceed with construction upon completion of design work.
  • Public feedback: Eighty-three percent of public responses opposed the U.S. 60 Connectivity Study project.

To view the executive summary and complete final report for the U.S. 60 Connectivity Study, visit https://us60connectivitystudy.com/

About the existing U.S. 51 Ohio River Bridge
The U.S. 51 Ohio River 'Cairo' Bridge serves as a north-south connector for U.S. 51 and an east-west transportation corridor for U.S. 60 and U.S. Highway 62. The bridge carries about 5,400 vehicles per day between Kentucky and Illinois. About 43% of the traffic is commercial trucks.
The existing Cairo Bridge crosses the Ohio River at navigation mile point 980.4 and carries U.S. 51, U.S. 60, and U.S. 62 traffic across the Ohio River. Opened to traffic in 1938, the Cairo Bridge is the longest bridge in Kentucky and the westernmost bridge over the Ohio River.
The existing bridge needs to be replaced because it is narrow, does not allow oversize or overweight loads, and does not accommodate pedestrians. Sight distance on the bridge is also inadequate, and a tight horizonal curve on the Kentucky approach does not meet current federal or state design standards. A new bridge would meet modern standards for traffic and would offer both roadway safety improvements and enhanced earthquake resistance as the structure lies in the New Madrid fault zone.

Cody606

Quote from: hbelkins on January 23, 2024, 04:29:31 PMKentucky's recommended highway plan has been released and is in the hands of the legislature now.

The most interesting thing I saw was a proposal to study reopening the Nolan Toll Bridge between Kentucky and West Virginia. I was under the impression that the construction of Corridor G (US 119) with its two crossings of the Kentucky/West Virginia state line had eliminated the need for the crossing at that location.

I live near this area. While the old toll bridge is convenient, that's about all it is. It would save people along the Hatfield/Huntleyville areas ten minutes or so going to Logan. The real need for that bridge is from the West Virginia residents of Nolan. For them, it can be a safety issue, but I have no clue what incentive Kentucky would have to finance that project or what it would do for the residents or transportation in the state of Kentucky.

Rothman

Quote from: Cody606 on June 22, 2024, 06:53:31 PM
Quote from: hbelkins on January 23, 2024, 04:29:31 PMKentucky's recommended highway plan has been released and is in the hands of the legislature now.

The most interesting thing I saw was a proposal to study reopening the Nolan Toll Bridge between Kentucky and West Virginia. I was under the impression that the construction of Corridor G (US 119) with its two crossings of the Kentucky/West Virginia state line had eliminated the need for the crossing at that location.

I live near this area. While the old toll bridge is convenient, that's about all it is. It would save people along the Hatfield/Huntleyville areas ten minutes or so going to Logan. The real need for that bridge is from the West Virginia residents of Nolan. For them, it can be a safety issue, but I have no clue what incentive Kentucky would have to finance that project or what it would do for the residents or transportation in the state of Kentucky.

Eh, a study is only a study.  Usually, they're put forward just to appease some squeaky wheel.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

seicer

#706
US 60 Connectivity Study

The US 60 Connectivity Study (KYTC Item Number 1-80250) was initiated by the Kentucky
Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) to examine a more direct corridor between US 60 in western
Kentucky and I-57 in southern Illinois. The study area, shown in Figure ES-1, overlaps with
highly environmentally sensitive areas flanking the Ohio River.

Given the known environmental resources within the study area, this study was completed
as Planning and Environmental Linkages Study (PEL Study),1 which takes a collaborative and
integrated approach to the transportation decision-making process by considering potential
environmental benefits and impacts during the planning phase.

Conclusion:

The US 60 Connectivity Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of constructing a new
US 60 corridor and Ohio River crossing between Barlow, Kentucky, and I-57 north of Cairo,
Illinois.

In addition to the cost comparisons and impacts cited in Table ES-2, the two projects show
stark timeline differences to satisfy Federal NEPA documentation. To advance a major
project in the US 60 Connectivity Study area, an EIS would likely be required, which involves
rigorous requirements (including enhanced public involvement required to navigate the
opposition cited by the public and local groups) and typically takes years to complete. In
contrast, the US 51 Bridge Replacement Project completed the NEPA requirements in 2022,
as well as all necessary federal, state, and local regulatory processes.

Along with the environmental regulatory hurdles, the US 60 Connectivity Study identified
potential disproportionately high and adverse effects to Environmental Justice populations
and received stated opposition for this project from several stakeholder groups including
the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife
Resources (KDFWR), Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW), Western Kentucky Wildlife
Association, Ducks Unlimited, mayors from the Disadvantaged Communities of Wickliffe and
Cairo, Director of the Ballard County Chamber of Commerce, and 83 percent of the public
comments.

Given the myriad environmental challenges, opposition from IDOT, and the $1.3 billion
needed to construct a project within the US 60 study area, KYTC does not recommend
funding future phases of this project. Instead, Kentucky's FY 2024 – FY 2030 Enacted Highway
Plan includes additional funding for the advancement of the US 51 Bridge Replacement
Project (Item No. 1-1140).

--

US 150 Corridor Study

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) initiated the US 150 Corridor Study in Boyle and
Lincoln Counties to identify concepts to improve safety, congestion, and mobility on US 150 and
the South Danville Bypass (US 127B and US 150B) from Fireside Drive in Danville to US 27 in
Stanford.

hbelkins

Quote from: seicer on July 01, 2024, 07:27:04 PMUS 150 Corridor Study

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) initiated the US 150 Corridor Study in Boyle and
Lincoln Counties to identify concepts to improve safety, congestion, and mobility on US 150 and
the South Danville Bypass (US 127B and US 150B) from Fireside Drive in Danville to US 27 in
Stanford.

This corridor is already four lanes; I'm not sure what else needs to be done to it. It's not terribly congested except at the US 127 intersection on the south side of town.


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

ibthebigd

I'd like to see US 27 4 Lanes all the way from north of Lancaster to Somerset with a bypass of Lancaster

SM-G996U


seicer

Quote from: hbelkins on July 02, 2024, 03:38:43 PM
Quote from: seicer on July 01, 2024, 07:27:04 PMUS 150 Corridor Study

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) initiated the US 150 Corridor Study in Boyle and
Lincoln Counties to identify concepts to improve safety, congestion, and mobility on US 150 and
the South Danville Bypass (US 127B and US 150B) from Fireside Drive in Danville to US 27 in
Stanford.

This corridor is already four lanes; I'm not sure what else needs to be done to it. It's not terribly congested except at the US 127 intersection on the south side of town.

It focuses on safety improvements on the bypasses and the corridor between the two cities. Generally, all of the private driveway median openings are proposed to be closed, with RCUT and median U-turns replacing the median openings. There are some other considerations, including backage and frontage road construction. Full-width shoulders should be considered (10' right, 4' left), but I don't think that is being considered now. US 150 features some of the oldest four-lane design characteristics in the state.

hbelkins

Quote from: seicer on July 02, 2024, 07:38:18 PM
Quote from: hbelkins on July 02, 2024, 03:38:43 PM
Quote from: seicer on July 01, 2024, 07:27:04 PMUS 150 Corridor Study

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) initiated the US 150 Corridor Study in Boyle and
Lincoln Counties to identify concepts to improve safety, congestion, and mobility on US 150 and
the South Danville Bypass (US 127B and US 150B) from Fireside Drive in Danville to US 27 in
Stanford.

This corridor is already four lanes; I'm not sure what else needs to be done to it. It's not terribly congested except at the US 127 intersection on the south side of town.

It focuses on safety improvements on the bypasses and the corridor between the two cities. Generally, all of the private driveway median openings are proposed to be closed, with RCUT and median U-turns replacing the median openings. There are some other considerations, including backage and frontage road construction. Full-width shoulders should be considered (10' right, 4' left), but I don't think that is being considered now. US 150 features some of the oldest four-lane design characteristics in the state.

If I'm not mistaken, there is at least one RCUT already under construction along the Danville Bypass.


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

CardInLex

Quote from: hbelkins on July 03, 2024, 03:27:30 PMIf I'm not mistaken, there is at least one RCUT already under construction along the Danville Bypass.

It has already opened. :)

ibthebigd

I was on US 23 between I-64 and Louisa and I was shocked the speed limit was 55. I feel 60 or 65 would be fine in that area.

SM-G996U


seicer

Almost all of it except for around Pikeville could be 65 MPH. As could be the new US 460 and US 119 alignments. There are segments of controlled access four-lanes in the western part of the state that are 65 MPH.

sprjus4

Quote from: seicer on July 08, 2024, 09:37:44 AMAlmost all of it except for around Pikeville could be 65 MPH. As could be the new US 460 and US 119 alignments. There are segments of controlled access four-lanes in the western part of the state that are 65 MPH.
Kentucky, along with Tennessee, seem to be opposed to 65 mph speed limits in the eastern, more mountainous areas of the state. I'm not sure why. There are a number of well-designed, 4 lane highways in the eastern areas of both states that should be bumped from 55 mph to 65 mph.

Ohio does a similar thing, posting 60 mph in the eastern part of the state on divided highways, but goes as high as 70 mph in the more flat, western part of the state.

Even Virginia, which comparatively has lower quality 4 lane highways, due to older age, posts 60 mph on their non-limited-access highways.

hbelkins

I don't understand why Kentucky posts 65 mph on four-lane routes such as KY 61 and US 68/KY 80 in the western part of the state, but won't sign anything in the east at 65 mph.

Not only US 23, US 119, and US 460; but large sections of KY 80 and US 25E could also be signed at 65 mph, as could much of the US 150/US 127 corridor between Stanford and Frankfort.

One possible reason for Kentucky's reluctance to sign routes in the eastern mountains higher than 55 might be that the former and late House Transportation Committee chairman, Hubie Collins, was from Johnson County and lived right along US 23 north of Paintsville. He was opposed to increasing the speed limits on these non-interstates.

I'd go farther and suggest that the speed limit could be 60 mph on routes like KY 15, new KY 30, KY 11 between Mt. Sterling and Maysville, and a lot of other roads. Those routes would be signed at 65 mph in Oklahoma.


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

hbelkins

Kentucky is looking to replace the Kentucky River bridge on the East/West Connector (KY 676) in Frankfort. That bridge was built in 1979 and has deteriorated to the point that its sufficiency rating is only 27.1.


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

seicer

Quote from: hbelkins on July 08, 2024, 02:56:07 PMKentucky is looking to replace the Kentucky River bridge on the East/West Connector (KY 676) in Frankfort. That bridge was built in 1979 and has deteriorated to the point that its sufficiency rating is only 27.1.
Yikes. Here is the project page for its replacement. My thoughts:

  • That is not a long lifespan for a box girder structure. Were there construction flaws that led to its premature deterioration?
  • There is a missed opportunity to provide turning lanes from KY 676 westbound to KY 420 northbound.
  • A proposed shared-use path is on one side of the Kentucky River bridge. How will that work? Will a concrete barrier be installed?
  • It's nice they are considering temporary trails for the Capitol View Park - a heavily utilized park. I wish the city would actually build up the park on the west bank of the river to match. 

wriddle082

Quote from: hbelkins on July 08, 2024, 02:56:07 PMKentucky is looking to replace the Kentucky River bridge on the East/West Connector (KY 676) in Frankfort. That bridge was built in 1979 and has deteriorated to the point that its sufficiency rating is only 27.1.

Hopefully they won't be working on this bridge replacement and parallel I-64 widening at the same time.

Regarding the non-freeway speed limits, there are numerous modern two lane roads all over the state with 12' lanes and 10' fully paved shoulders with not a lot of traffic that should be posted at 60.  Tennessee, ditto.

Rothman

Wonder if just the frequency of cross streets on US 23 makes KYTC reluctant to raise the speed limit.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

hbelkins

Quote from: wriddle082 on July 08, 2024, 05:07:20 PM
Quote from: hbelkins on July 08, 2024, 02:56:07 PMKentucky is looking to replace the Kentucky River bridge on the East/West Connector (KY 676) in Frankfort. That bridge was built in 1979 and has deteriorated to the point that its sufficiency rating is only 27.1.

Hopefully they won't be working on this bridge replacement and parallel I-64 widening at the same time.

Regarding the non-freeway speed limits, there are numerous modern two lane roads all over the state with 12' lanes and 10' fully paved shoulders with not a lot of traffic that should be posted at 60.  Tennessee, ditto.


My guess is they want to get this done before they even begin to widen that stretch of 64. With all the blasting that will have to be done between exits 53 (US 127) and 58 (US 60), that will no doubt be a traffic nightmare when they finally get started with it.

I'm not sure what goes into the sufficiency ratings. Both the I-64 bridges have higher sufficiency ratings than does the KY 676 bridge, yet the KY 676 bridge is rated "poor" and the I-64 bridges are rated "fair."


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

seicer

I suspect it's the box girder design of KY 676 that is failing.

CanesFan27

Around 8:00 pm every evening, [owner Keith] Stone starts a bonfire in the common area around the teepees. It is time for the guests - if they wish - to gather and enjoy the evening.

"There's a magic to the campfire," Stone says. "Things slow down, people talk."

A feature on the classic Wigwam Village No 2 in Cave City, KY: (US 31W - Dixie Highway)

https://www.gribblenation.org/2024/07/wigwam-village-no-2-cave-city-ky.html

jnewkirk77

Quote from: hbelkins on July 08, 2024, 02:46:18 PMI don't understand why Kentucky posts 65 mph on four-lane routes such as KY 61 and US 68/KY 80 in the western part of the state, but won't sign anything in the east at 65 mph.

Not everything in the west is 65 ... US 60/231 NE of Owensboro is still, ridiculously, 55.



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