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Author Topic: "Freeway Entrance" signage  (Read 23442 times)

ethanhopkin14

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #150 on: February 21, 2022, 12:53:16 AM »

Intresting

In the future please elaborate a bit more then a single misspelled word for a GSV link.

I find it interesting that a freeway entrance sign in California has an up pointing arrow instead of a down pointing one as the norm.  I have never seen that before personally, in California.  Excuse the brevity, I saw it while working and didn't have a whole lot of time to type a novel on something I thought would be accepted as unique by other as well.  If this isn't that unique, then my sincere apologies.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #151 on: February 21, 2022, 12:57:40 AM »

Intresting

In the future please elaborate a bit more then a single misspelled word for a GSV link.

I find it interesting that a freeway entrance sign in California has an up pointing arrow instead of a down pointing one as the norm.  I have never seen that before personally, in California.  Excuse the brevity, I saw it while working and didn't have a whole lot of time to type a novel on something I thought would be accepted as unique by other as well.  If this isn't that unique, then my sincere apologies.

My quick thought would be the sign was an error and should have been pointing down to the right, not to the left. The contractor/installer flipped it so at least it was pointing in the correct direction, and never got fully fixed.
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roadfro

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #152 on: February 21, 2022, 05:13:52 PM »

Intresting

In the future please elaborate a bit more then a single misspelled word for a GSV link.

I find it interesting that a freeway entrance sign in California has an up pointing arrow instead of a down pointing one as the norm.  I have never seen that before personally, in California.  Excuse the brevity, I saw it while working and didn't have a whole lot of time to type a novel on something I thought would be accepted as unique by other as well.  If this isn't that unique, then my sincere apologies.

My quick thought would be the sign was an error and should have been pointing down to the right, not to the left. The contractor/installer flipped it so at least it was pointing in the correct direction, and never got fully fixed.

It is supposed to be a diagonally downward-facing arrow, but it's not too uncommon to see a diagonally upward-facing arrow used in error. You'll see that sometimes in Nevada as well. Sometimes due to the geometry, it makes sense why the wrong arrow might be used—as in this example of Sparks Blvd SB ramp to I-80 EB in Sparks, NV.

The downward diagonal arrow is used in freeway entrance assemblies as a means to convey the message of "here" (as in "the freeway entrance is here"), similar to how a downward diagonal arrow is now used at signed marked crosswalks to indicate the actual crossing location.

<rant>I actually kinda wish the MUTCD would adopt the curved shaft arrow used (only?) on the R1-5 series "yield/stop for pedestrian" signs, such as the R1-5-bL sign below. That is one definitive use of a downward-facing arrow meant to signify to do something at a specific point, and not a diagonal arrow meant to give a direction. Such arrow could be used at freeway entrance assemblies, pedestrian and similar crossings, "stop here on red", and similar signs that reference something happening/existing at a particular spot.

</rant>
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ethanhopkin14

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #153 on: February 25, 2022, 01:43:47 PM »

Intresting

In the future please elaborate a bit more then a single misspelled word for a GSV link.

I find it interesting that a freeway entrance sign in California has an up pointing arrow instead of a down pointing one as the norm.  I have never seen that before personally, in California.  Excuse the brevity, I saw it while working and didn't have a whole lot of time to type a novel on something I thought would be accepted as unique by other as well.  If this isn't that unique, then my sincere apologies.

My quick thought would be the sign was an error and should have been pointing down to the right, not to the left. The contractor/installer flipped it so at least it was pointing in the correct direction, and never got fully fixed.

It is supposed to be a diagonally downward-facing arrow, but it's not too uncommon to see a diagonally upward-facing arrow used in error. You'll see that sometimes in Nevada as well. Sometimes due to the geometry, it makes sense why the wrong arrow might be used—as in this example of Sparks Blvd SB ramp to I-80 EB in Sparks, NV.

The downward diagonal arrow is used in freeway entrance assemblies as a means to convey the message of "here" (as in "the freeway entrance is here"), similar to how a downward diagonal arrow is now used at signed marked crosswalks to indicate the actual crossing location.

<rant>I actually kinda wish the MUTCD would adopt the curved shaft arrow used (only?) on the R1-5 series "yield/stop for pedestrian" signs, such as the R1-5-bL sign below. That is one definitive use of a downward-facing arrow meant to signify to do something at a specific point, and not a diagonal arrow meant to give a direction. Such arrow could be used at freeway entrance assemblies, pedestrian and similar crossings, "stop here on red", and similar signs that reference something happening/existing at a particular spot.

</rant>

I have seen this set up in Texas, New Mexico, Nevada and Arizona.  I have NEVER seen it in California. 
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ethanhopkin14

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #154 on: April 27, 2022, 12:24:26 PM »

Let me know if this one is unusual.  HIGHWAY ENTRANCE.  Admittingly, I have not spent a lot of time in the Pacific Northwest, but I don't recall that verbiage being discussed before. 
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jakeroot

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #155 on: April 27, 2022, 06:29:41 PM »

Let me know if this one is unusual.  HIGHWAY ENTRANCE.  Admittingly, I have not spent a lot of time in the Pacific Northwest, but I don't recall that verbiage being discussed before.

Generally used only when it’s not a freeway (such as a two lane, undivided road) but uses a freeway-style ramp. In this case, because of the border crossing and all of the infrastructure related to it (never mind the very low speed limit), they opted for HIGHWAY ENTRANCE instead.

ethanhopkin14

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #156 on: April 27, 2022, 07:02:18 PM »

Let me know if this one is unusual.  HIGHWAY ENTRANCE.  Admittingly, I have not spent a lot of time in the Pacific Northwest, but I don't recall that verbiage being discussed before.

Generally used only when it’s not a freeway (such as a two lane, undivided road) but uses a freeway-style ramp. In this case, because of the border crossing and all of the infrastructure related to it (never mind the very low speed limit), they opted for HIGHWAY ENTRANCE instead.

I guess I rarely see entrance ramps that go to non-freeways. 
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kphoger

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #157 on: April 28, 2022, 08:48:18 AM »

I guess I rarely see entrance ramps that go to non-freeways. 

Really?  I've used non-freeway entrance ramps quite a bit in Texas.  Near you, aren't there a couple along Loop-360?
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DenverBrian

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #158 on: April 28, 2022, 09:28:01 AM »

I've always thought the actual "FREEWAY ENTRANCE" signs were a way for some state DOTs to eke out a little more money from their governments. The signs seem kind of "well, duh" to me, but if you can mandate thousands of them around your state, you can keep a few more people on the payroll making 'em.
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elsmere241

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #159 on: April 28, 2022, 11:24:00 AM »

Let me know if this one is unusual.  HIGHWAY ENTRANCE.  Admittingly, I have not spent a lot of time in the Pacific Northwest, but I don't recall that verbiage being discussed before. 

I've seen those on US 395 between Pasco and Ritzville, Washington.  It's mostly freeway but has some at-grade intersections.
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ethanhopkin14

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #160 on: April 28, 2022, 03:10:58 PM »

I guess I rarely see entrance ramps that go to non-freeways. 

Really?  I've used non-freeway entrance ramps quite a bit in Texas.  Near you, aren't there a couple along Loop-360?

Yeah, but not really what I was initially thinking.   I was thinking of an entrance ramp on a non-divided highway.  Not really sure why I had that in mind.

The example you gave actually do exist a lot in Texas.  I call it an almost freeway. 

I have seen them, just mean its mostly rare. 
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jakeroot

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #161 on: April 28, 2022, 04:44:27 PM »

I've always thought the actual "FREEWAY ENTRANCE" signs were a way for some state DOTs to eke out a little more money from their governments. The signs seem kind of "well, duh" to me, but if you can mandate thousands of them around your state, you can keep a few more people on the payroll making 'em.

Really? I've always found them to be exceptionally useful. To the extent that driving in areas without them, I find it needlessly frustrating how ramps are rarely signed at all besides something halfway down the ramp indicating some kind of restrictions. FREEWAY ENTRANCE signage really makes it very clear exactly where the ramp is, and exactly what you might expect.

For the record, the signs are so incredibly cheap, there's virtually no chance they impact budgets. They can last decades and can be made very quickly and cheaply.

kphoger

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #162 on: April 28, 2022, 04:46:34 PM »


I've always thought the actual "FREEWAY ENTRANCE" signs were a way for some state DOTs to eke out a little more money from their governments. The signs seem kind of "well, duh" to me, but if you can mandate thousands of them around your state, you can keep a few more people on the payroll making 'em.

Really? I've always found them to be exceptionally useful. To the extent that driving in areas without them, I find it needlessly frustrating how ramps are rarely signed at all besides something halfway down the ramp indicating some kind of restrictions. FREEWAY ENTRANCE signage really makes it very clear exactly where the ramp is, and exactly what you might expect.

For the record, the signs are so incredibly cheap, there's virtually no chance they impact budgets. They can last decades and can be made very quickly and cheaply.

Sometimes, too, it's tough to tell exactly which road is the on-ramp, if there are other side-streets or business entrances immediately nearby.
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roadman65

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #163 on: December 31, 2022, 11:42:52 AM »

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #164 on: January 03, 2023, 05:43:20 AM »

Here at Cedar St and Pearl St in Deming, NM it would have been nice if they combined the "Freeway Entrance" sign with the large yellow sign saying "No Access to Businesses..."

They should have put the freeway entrance sign above the yellow sign instead of further down the ramp. Overall, it isn't a big deal but the signage still could be better.
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J N Winkler

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #165 on: January 04, 2023, 07:32:07 PM »

Here at Cedar St and Pearl St in Deming, NM it would have been nice if they combined the "Freeway Entrance" sign with the large yellow sign saying "No Access to Businesses..."

They should have put the freeway entrance sign above the yellow sign instead of further down the ramp. Overall, it isn't a big deal but the signage still could be better.

This--not just the signs, but also the very closely spaced post-mounted delineators--all has the odor of a custom treatment devised to address a specific problem, possibly illegal roadside vending along the ramp.  (I think I have a photo--also from New Mexico--of a vendor next to a "No Vending" sign.)
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roadfro

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #166 on: January 05, 2023, 11:10:56 AM »

Here at Cedar St and Pearl St in Deming, NM it would have been nice if they combined the "Freeway Entrance" sign with the large yellow sign saying "No Access to Businesses..."

They should have put the freeway entrance sign above the yellow sign instead of further down the ramp. Overall, it isn't a big deal but the signage still could be better.

This--not just the signs, but also the very closely spaced post-mounted delineators--all has the odor of a custom treatment devised to address a specific problem, possibly illegal roadside vending along the ramp.  (I think I have a photo--also from New Mexico--of a vendor next to a "No Vending" sign.)

That explanation makes sense. I was wondering about the fence lines close to the edges of pavement that didn't seem to serve a practical purpose...
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ethanhopkin14

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #167 on: January 05, 2023, 02:27:24 PM »

Here at Cedar St and Pearl St in Deming, NM it would have been nice if they combined the "Freeway Entrance" sign with the large yellow sign saying "No Access to Businesses..."

They should have put the freeway entrance sign above the yellow sign instead of further down the ramp. Overall, it isn't a big deal but the signage still could be better.

This--not just the signs, but also the very closely spaced post-mounted delineators--all has the odor of a custom treatment devised to address a specific problem, possibly illegal roadside vending along the ramp.  (I think I have a photo--also from New Mexico--of a vendor next to a "No Vending" sign.)

That explanation makes sense. I was wondering about the fence lines close to the edges of pavement that didn't seem to serve a practical purpose...

I agree, but not to roadside vending.  I think enough people made the turn to go to the business right at the corner, realized they made the wrong preemptive turn, and just pulled over and parked right off the side of the entrance ramp.  Me-thinks it got bad at one point that it looked like a parking lot on the side of the building, the state didn't like people parking in the right-of-way and put a stop to that.  Thats why I think the wording is "NO ACCESS TO BUSINESSES BEYOND THIS POINT" rather than "NO PARKING" or " NO STANDING".
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kphoger

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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #168 on: January 05, 2023, 02:48:12 PM »

It's the end of a frontage road.  The sign makes sense.

Then again, it's New Mexico.  So you also end up with stuff like this CONTROLLED ACCESS sign (whose meaning is itself unclear) getting turned 90°.
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Re: "Freeway Entrance" signage
« Reply #169 on: January 05, 2023, 07:44:01 PM »

It's the end of a frontage road.  The sign makes sense.

Then again, it's New Mexico.  So you also end up with stuff like this CONTROLLED ACCESS sign (whose meaning is itself unclear) getting turned 90°.

Traditionally, the "Controlled Access" signage is a reminder to adjacent landowners that they must contact the DOT for approval to connect driveways and parking lots to what WVDOH calls a "Partially Limited Access Highway".  These are roads where the DOT has jurisdiction over all connections. 
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