National Boards > Bridges

Bridge Railings

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plain:

--- Quote from: Dirt Roads on July 27, 2022, 07:31:04 PM ---
--- Quote from: seicer on July 26, 2022, 08:57:58 AM ---- Some of the earliest bridges along I-64 in Kentucky feature a double pipe barrier. <safety changes snipped> https://goo.gl/maps/dVEVCXTYGpSiFaKo7

--- End quote ---

These were also common on the early sections of I-64 in West Virginia, including bridges on the Interstate itself.  This one in Kentucky looks like it has an intentional walkway on the left side and a much narrower curbpath on the right side.  In West Virginia, they almost entirely had curbpaths on both sides with no room for pedestrians.

--- End quote ---

Common on earlier bridges in VA as well, though they have been getting replaced. Here's a few of the ones still around in the Richmond area:

I-95 over Deepwater Terminal Rd, double rail remains on NB side only (opened 1958)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/iKcNjEVD6G57xTgF6

US 1/301 over I-95/64 (1958)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/h19XtXZ29a9VEBs47

Fort Lee Rd over I-85 (1958)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/rVppDg3HoL3cymTX9

SR 657 over I-95 (1963)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/yJ4CQuSPc5ujMqse6

VA 33 over I-64 (1966)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/ASCqfzQkVZhfC1RA7

plain:
And here's a newer type of single rail that VDOT have been installing lately

I-64 over VA 33 near Highland Springs and Sandston
https://maps.app.goo.gl/pnNDnR7QLHoCXRDb6

D-Dey65:

--- Quote from: plain on July 27, 2022, 08:44:38 PM ---Common on earlier bridges in VA as well, though they have been getting replaced. Here's a few of the ones still around in the Richmond area:

I-95 over Deepwater Terminal Rd, double rail remains on NB side only (opened 1958)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/iKcNjEVD6G57xTgF6

US 1/301 over I-95/64 (1958)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/h19XtXZ29a9VEBs47

Fort Lee Rd over I-85 (1958)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/rVppDg3HoL3cymTX9

SR 657 over I-95 (1963)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/yJ4CQuSPc5ujMqse6

VA 33 over I-64 (1966)
https://maps.app.goo.gl/ASCqfzQkVZhfC1RA7

--- End quote ---
I used to think this was the common standard though most of the country, and anything else I saw pre-dated the Interstate Highway System.

cl94:
Late arrivals to the concrete barrier game were New York and the New England states, which preferred metal rails for most applications until the late 90s, far later than the rest of the country. Major benefits to using metal barriers are lower weight and narrower profile, which is a huge reason why you still see New England and New York installing metal rails for certain applications. On freeways, they tend to be limited to locations where they are replacing older metal rails and are almost never used on new bridges. Surface roads still use metal rails quite frequently, particularly when there is bike/ped traffic.

In the 50s and early 60s, this was the standard used for freeways in much of New York, many examples being supplemented by other barriers: https://goo.gl/maps/KZPzDBgKkWWY6ZfX6
Mid-60s into the 70s, you had a lot of these: https://goo.gl/maps/s9VdVLDU98xU9xvy8
70s-90s was this style, which I still think of as the "dominant" style on New York roads: https://goo.gl/maps/QniWk8FtyGjHmtRa6
The modern style of metal rail is this: https://goo.gl/maps/AYFqwiJPjMizn9TQA

Each of these styles can be modified depending on bike/ped traffic to have up to 5 rails. For example, this is the modern rail used in pedestrian areas: https://goo.gl/maps/iusc5fjk4adm4rcM6

Mr_Northside:
I recall when they were doing major rehab on the Ft. Pitt Bridge (here in Pittsburgh) around the turn-of-the-millennium, the original "pipe" railings were to be replaced with the standard concrete barrier, as it was reported it was the mandated method for safety reasons.   There was enough of an "outcry" about how it would make the views from the bridge (known for it's iconic views of downtown coming out of the tunnel) a lot more blocked on the sides.

They were able to find a compromise that met safety standards, but utilized a metal railing with a sturdier concrete base than the original.  Since then, it's a style used quite often now.

https://goo.gl/maps/giwXUHzEV2JWYrMp8

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