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Michigan Notes

Started by MDOTFanFB, October 26, 2012, 08:06:31 PM

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JREwing78

Quote from: michiganguy123 on April 14, 2024, 08:12:48 PMWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over? I'm always driving 80mph in a 70 and drove by atleast 7 michigan cops now without a problem. I know they acknowledged that everyone is driving 80mph anyway back when they increased some highways to 75mph, which was supposed to be 80mph.
MSP generally doesn't bother until 11 over. But if they're going to the trouble of pulling you over, they're generally going to write you a ticket.

Also note that your car speedometer may not be perfectly accurate, and you may be driving 7 or 8 over. Or you're doing 12 over and you just got lucky.

County sheriff deputies and municipal police also patrol the freeways and may not follow MSP standard operating practice.

I keep my cruise set to 8 over and they don't bother me.

SM-G991U



JREwing78



Quote from: michiganguy123 on April 14, 2024, 08:12:48 PMWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over?

I *have* done 85 in a 70 and had MSP *try* to pull me over. It was just before an exit where the road went downhill out of sight of the officer. I took the exit. The trooper didn't. My driving record didn't get more points on it that day.



SM-G991U


Flint1979

I was doing 85 in a 70 zone going SB on I-75 and noticed a state trooper slowing down on the NB side to turn around so I thought he would have been after me which he probably was but I noticed a long line of traffic at exit 93 and went up the shoulder of the ramp made a right on Dixie and saw the cop fly by going SB on I-75. I thought welp I'm not getting back on the highway for a minute. I noticed a Farmer Jack (that's how long ago this was) went in there and acted like I was grocery shopping for a minute then left and took another route to get back to I-75 I can't remember off the top of my head which way I went though.

webny99

Quote from: Flint1979 on April 13, 2024, 02:00:16 PMDouble-barreled action on I-75 around mile marker 166.

Is that unusual in Michigan? It's very common here. I can think of at least two median U-turn locations where two cops is as common as just one. I just figure it's a slow day and they're taking the chance to chat with their co-workers.



Quote from: JREwing78 on April 15, 2024, 12:58:51 AM
Quote from: michiganguy123 on April 14, 2024, 08:12:48 PMWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over?

I *have* done 85 in a 70 and had MSP *try* to pull me over. It was just before an exit where the road went downhill out of sight of the officer. I took the exit. The trooper didn't. My driving record didn't get more points on it that day.

Lucky! I was in a similar situation on NY 104 once, definitely speeding but don't remember my speed. I saw the cop pull out behind me, but far enough back that I wasn't sure if he was after me or not. I sure didn't bother to find out, and bailed at the next exit as soon as I got around the bend and out of his view. I turned right ASAP and wound my way back to the highway on backroads just to be sure. A hair raising experience to be sure.


vdeane

Quote from: webny99 on April 17, 2024, 09:34:06 PM
Quote
QuoteWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over?

I *have* done 85 in a 70 and had MSP *try* to pull me over. It was just before an exit where the road went downhill out of sight of the officer. I took the exit. The trooper didn't. My driving record didn't get more points on it that day.

Lucky! I was in a similar situation on NY 104 once, definitely speeding but don't remember my speed. I saw the cop pull out behind me, but far enough back that I wasn't sure if he was after me or not. I sure didn't bother to find out, and bailed at the next exit as soon as I got around the bend and out of his view. I turned right ASAP and wound my way back to the highway on backroads just to be sure. A hair raising experience to be sure.
Driving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

Rothman

Quote from: vdeane on April 18, 2024, 12:54:03 PM
Quote from: webny99 on April 17, 2024, 09:34:06 PM
Quote
QuoteWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over?

I *have* done 85 in a 70 and had MSP *try* to pull me over. It was just before an exit where the road went downhill out of sight of the officer. I took the exit. The trooper didn't. My driving record didn't get more points on it that day.

Lucky! I was in a similar situation on NY 104 once, definitely speeding but don't remember my speed. I saw the cop pull out behind me, but far enough back that I wasn't sure if he was after me or not. I sure didn't bother to find out, and bailed at the next exit as soon as I got around the bend and out of his view. I turned right ASAP and wound my way back to the highway on backroads just to be sure. A hair raising experience to be sure.
Driving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.

They raise the speed limit, people will go 10+ over that...hence the biggest reason why the speed limits are kept low up here.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Flint1979

Quote from: webny99 on April 17, 2024, 09:34:06 PM
Quote from: Flint1979 on April 13, 2024, 02:00:16 PMDouble-barreled action on I-75 around mile marker 166.

Is that unusual in Michigan? It's very common here. I can think of at least two median U-turn locations where two cops is as common as just one. I just figure it's a slow day and they're taking the chance to chat with their co-workers.
I've seen it before but usually it seems like there is just one car sitting there whenever they are sitting somewhere. But two isn't really uncommon I don't think.

vdeane

Quote from: Rothman on April 18, 2024, 10:44:36 PMThey raise the speed limit, people will go 10+ over that...hence the biggest reason why the speed limits are kept low up here.
That feels like something "everyone knows" that isn't actually true.  Wish there was some education to get rid of that misconception.  There have been studies all over the place where states have raised their speed limits proving that this isn't the case, yet citizens and lawmakers ignore them.

In any case, with the rise of camera enforcement and the like, if we don't get a 70 mph speed limit in NY, I'll likely soon be forced to choose between risking tickets or every major trip taking 30-60 minutes longer than present.  Memorizing camera locations, enforcement tolerances, etc. and having to behave differently in every place even when the posted speed limit is the same is not a game that I want to play.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

Rothman

Quote from: vdeane on April 19, 2024, 12:43:59 PM
Quote from: Rothman on April 18, 2024, 10:44:36 PMThey raise the speed limit, people will go 10+ over that...hence the biggest reason why the speed limits are kept low up here.
That feels like something "everyone knows" that isn't actually true.  Wish there was some education to get rid of that misconception.  There have been studies all over the place where states have raised their speed limits proving that this isn't the case, yet citizens and lawmakers ignore them.

In any case, with the rise of camera enforcement and the like, if we don't get a 70 mph speed limit in NY, I'll likely soon be forced to choose between risking tickets or every major trip taking 30-60 minutes longer than present.  Memorizing camera locations, enforcement tolerances, etc. and having to behave differently in every place even when the posted speed limit is the same is not a game that I want to play.

I don't know.  I'd think the speed limit would have to be raised pretty high to lessen the "buffer effect" up here.

On my eclipse trip, I was taken aback by how slowly Texans drive -- at least where I was in San Antonio and the adjacent Hill Country.  Seemed to me there was more of a compliance with the speed limit compared to the Thruway, where 80 mph+ in a 65 mph zone is common in the left lane.

Camera speed enforcement in NY is posted and signed.  In my personal opinion, I believe there is a buffer of sorts even with them.

Anyway, speeding anywhere has a risk of a ticket, I suppose.  But, I have found that a combination of not speeding too much (<15 mph over) and keeping one's eyes peeled for enforcement is effective.

Haven't got a ticket in over a decade now and I'm driving more than ever.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

webny99

Quote from: vdeane on April 18, 2024, 12:54:03 PMDriving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.

I would extend that to 15 over on freeways. The risk of getting pulled over for 10-14 over in a 55 or 65 mph zone in NY is pretty low, especially because you usually won't be the fastest one on the road, you can slow down to 10 over almost instantly, and might not even be going as fast to begin with depending on your speedometer error. 15-19 over is what I think of as the calculated risk zone, meaning I wouldn't typically drive this fast on a road trip nor set the cruise in this range, but am comfortable with it intermittently on local highways. And 20+ over is the true danger zone due to standing out from other traffic, 6 points on your license if ticketed, and mandatory $300 fine.

Surface streets are trickier. There are some where I speed 10-14 over quite regularly, and others where that feels too fast (or where traffic rarely/never allows for it anyways).


webny99

Quote from: Rothman on April 19, 2024, 02:31:12 PMOn my eclipse trip, I was taken aback by how slowly Texans drive -- at least where I was in San Antonio and the adjacent Hill Country.  Seemed to me there was more of a compliance with the speed limit compared to the Thruway, where 80 mph+ in a 65 mph zone is common in the left lane.

I agree relative to the speed limit, but the limits are also higher, so faster traffic still moves at ~80 mph and the overall flow is about as good or better (though I-10 north/west of SA can be a slog).

michiganguy123

Quote from: Rothman on April 18, 2024, 10:44:36 PM
Quote from: vdeane on April 18, 2024, 12:54:03 PM
Quote from: webny99 on April 17, 2024, 09:34:06 PM
Quote
QuoteWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over?

I *have* done 85 in a 70 and had MSP *try* to pull me over. It was just before an exit where the road went downhill out of sight of the officer. I took the exit. The trooper didn't. My driving record didn't get more points on it that day.

Lucky! I was in a similar situation on NY 104 once, definitely speeding but don't remember my speed. I saw the cop pull out behind me, but far enough back that I wasn't sure if he was after me or not. I sure didn't bother to find out, and bailed at the next exit as soon as I got around the bend and out of his view. I turned right ASAP and wound my way back to the highway on backroads just to be sure. A hair raising experience to be sure.
Driving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.

They raise the speed limit, people will go 10+ over that...hence the biggest reason why the speed limits are kept low up here.

When Michigan increased speed limits to 75mph in the rural areas, most people still only do 80mph. The speed limits were supposed to be set to 80mph because everyone is driving that speed already but was changed in order for the bill to be passed.
80mph is like the perfect speed for a freeway, any higher and fuel efficiency greatly decreases. Speeds are pretty much the same on the 70 and 75mph sections, both speed limits, the normal flow is 80mph

michiganguy123

Quote from: webny99 on April 19, 2024, 06:51:42 PM
Quote from: vdeane on April 18, 2024, 12:54:03 PMDriving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.

I would extend that to 15 over on freeways. The risk of getting pulled over for 10-14 over in a 55 or 65 mph zone in NY is pretty low, especially because you usually won't be the fastest one on the road, you can slow down to 10 over almost instantly, and might not even be going as fast to begin with depending on your speedometer error. 15-19 over is what I think of as the calculated risk zone, meaning I wouldn't typically drive this fast on a road trip nor set the cruise in this range, but am comfortable with it intermittently on local highways. And 20+ over is the true danger zone due to standing out from other traffic, 6 points on your license if ticketed, and mandatory $300 fine.

Surface streets are trickier. There are some where I speed 10-14 over quite regularly, and others where that feels too fast (or where traffic rarely/never allows for it anyways).



Freeway speed limits shouldn't even be that low in the first place

Rothman

Quote from: michiganguy123 on April 19, 2024, 07:45:20 PM
Quote from: Rothman on April 18, 2024, 10:44:36 PM
Quote from: vdeane on April 18, 2024, 12:54:03 PM
Quote from: webny99 on April 17, 2024, 09:34:06 PM
Quote
QuoteWhat's the highest speed someone has blown past a state trooper without getting pulled over?

I *have* done 85 in a 70 and had MSP *try* to pull me over. It was just before an exit where the road went downhill out of sight of the officer. I took the exit. The trooper didn't. My driving record didn't get more points on it that day.

Lucky! I was in a similar situation on NY 104 once, definitely speeding but don't remember my speed. I saw the cop pull out behind me, but far enough back that I wasn't sure if he was after me or not. I sure didn't bother to find out, and bailed at the next exit as soon as I got around the bend and out of his view. I turned right ASAP and wound my way back to the highway on backroads just to be sure. A hair raising experience to be sure.
Driving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.

They raise the speed limit, people will go 10+ over that...hence the biggest reason why the speed limits are kept low up here.

When Michigan increased speed limits to 75mph in the rural areas, most people still only do 80mph. The speed limits were supposed to be set to 80mph because everyone is driving that speed already but was changed in order for the bill to be passed.
80mph is like the perfect speed for a freeway, any higher and fuel efficiency greatly decreases. Speeds are pretty much the same on the 70 and 75mph sections, both speed limits, the normal flow is 80mph

I agree with the 80mph speed being perfect, but Michiganders are silly. :D 

Have to say that the higher speeds I hit do take a toll on my mileage.  I do wonder what the magic speed is where you get somewhere faster without incurring additional gas stops.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

vdeane

Quote from: webny99 on April 19, 2024, 06:51:42 PM
Quote from: vdeane on April 18, 2024, 12:54:03 PMDriving sure seems simpler staying within 10 mph of the speed limit.  Now if only the northeast would raise its speed limits so I could go exactly the speed limit (without substantially affecting my travel time) and make it simpler still; while most places won't pull you over for 5-7 over, some do, and that's even more common with cameras.

I would extend that to 15 over on freeways. The risk of getting pulled over for 10-14 over in a 55 or 65 mph zone in NY is pretty low, especially because you usually won't be the fastest one on the road, you can slow down to 10 over almost instantly, and might not even be going as fast to begin with depending on your speedometer error. 15-19 over is what I think of as the calculated risk zone, meaning I wouldn't typically drive this fast on a road trip nor set the cruise in this range, but am comfortable with it intermittently on local highways. And 20+ over is the true danger zone due to standing out from other traffic, 6 points on your license if ticketed, and mandatory $300 fine.

Surface streets are trickier. There are some where I speed 10-14 over quite regularly, and others where that feels too fast (or where traffic rarely/never allows for it anyways).


If I were to do it, I'd raise the speed limit on the Thruway to 70 (or even 75) but keep the enforcement threshold exactly the same (around 80).  The tolerance should be for ensuring that speedometer and radar calibration errors don't result in a ticket, not a cushion for people who want to speed - but that should be done after the limit is raised to something reasonable, not before.

Quote from: Rothman on April 19, 2024, 02:31:12 PMI don't know.  I'd think the speed limit would have to be raised pretty high to lessen the "buffer effect" up here.

On my eclipse trip, I was taken aback by how slowly Texans drive -- at least where I was in San Antonio and the adjacent Hill Country.  Seemed to me there was more of a compliance with the speed limit compared to the Thruway, where 80 mph+ in a 65 mph zone is common in the left lane.

Camera speed enforcement in NY is posted and signed.  In my personal opinion, I believe there is a buffer of sorts even with them.

Anyway, speeding anywhere has a risk of a ticket, I suppose.  But, I have found that a combination of not speeding too much (<15 mph over) and keeping one's eyes peeled for enforcement is effective.

Haven't got a ticket in over a decade now and I'm driving more than ever.
Sure, NY's work zone speed cameras are signed.  NYC's "school zone" cameras aren't.  Nor are many in other jurisdictions, at least not as precisely as the NY work zone ones.  Take this one in Iowa, which I happen to know about only because I happened to be poking around in street view (I didn't even know Iowa had speed cameras until I did!).  No signage, and from what I've read, no tolerance either.  Already my "5 over on surface roads, 7 over on freeways and some divided highways" has carve-outs for Emporia, VA; Hopewell Junction, VA; Washington, DC; Roosevelt Boulevard (US 1) in Philadelphia; and Qu├ębec (from what I've heard, their cameras photo everyone going any amount over the limit and from their it's at the discretion of the police officer reviewing the photos, and that they have less tolerance with the cameras than in person).  I hate having carve-outs, and like I said, keeping track of how different jurisdictions handle these matters isn't a game I want to play.  But changing the policy to "just go the limit exactly" would make my drive between Rochester and Albany close to half an hour longer, and reduce the amount I could travel in a day for longer trips by about 60 miles.

Quote from: michiganguy123 on April 19, 2024, 07:45:20 PMWhen Michigan increased speed limits to 75mph in the rural areas, most people still only do 80mph. The speed limits were supposed to be set to 80mph because everyone is driving that speed already but was changed in order for the bill to be passed.
80mph is like the perfect speed for a freeway, any higher and fuel efficiency greatly decreases. Speeds are pretty much the same on the 70 and 75mph sections, both speed limits, the normal flow is 80mph
Exactly.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

JREwing78

Michigan's speed limits tend to be set pretty aggressively, so I tend not to speed around town. Thank the State Police for that; they require a speed study be performed when setting speed limits, and they run 5-10 mph higher than similar roadways in other states.

SM-G991U




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