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ran4sh:
That's part of why I allow Facebook to email me all the notifications it can, including replies to comments and that sort of thing. I've had issues where FB and/or the group or the person creating the post decides to delete it, so it's nice to be able to go through my emails and see what was said.

tolbs17:

--- Quote from: sprjus4 on May 30, 2021, 08:51:13 PM ---North Carolina had a large freeway building era in the 1990s and 2000s. It has slowed down to some extent since, but is still progressing more than most states can say. Still major urban projects ongoing with completing Beltways around Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Fayetteville, and Raleigh The previous couple decades focused on the southern part of Greensboro, all of Charlotte’s, and the northern part of Raleigh.

For major long distance freeway corridors, the 70s and 90s was mainly US-64 and US-264 (connecting towards the Outer Banks, US-17, and Greenville) late 80s and early 90s was mainly I-40 to Wilmington and through Raleigh-Durham, and then the 90s and 2000s were I-73 and I-74 south of Winston-Salem and Greensboro, plus I-795.

My prediction is the 2020s will largely focus on completing I-42, then the 2030s and into 40s will be I-795 and I-87.

Major widening projects, the 90s was I-40/I-85 from Greensboro to Durham, 2010s was I-85 between Lexington and Charlotte, and the 2020s will be I-95 between Lumberton and I-40, and I-26 south of Asheville.

Obviously there are others, but those are ones that stand out.

--- End quote ---
And you got I-140, the Wilson bypass, Clayton bypass, and much more.

Tom958:

--- Quote from: ran4sh on June 15, 2021, 12:42:40 AM ---That's part of why I allow Facebook to email me all the notifications it can, including replies to comments and that sort of thing. I've had issues where FB and/or the group or the person creating the post decides to delete it, so it's nice to be able to go through my emails and see what was said.

--- End quote ---

That's beside the point. the point is that GDOT's PR people should learn to engage reasonably with the public rather than, in this case, deleting the whole conversation. Wouldn't it have been wonderful if they'd replied, "Yes, we realize that those signs aren't what they should be. However, since the interchange will be reconfigured in the next few years, the decision has been made to leave them as-is." There. Was that so hard?

architect77:

--- Quote from: Tom958 on June 11, 2021, 06:49:22 PM ---So, yesterday I was on GDOT's metro Atlanta Facebook page. They'd posted about an upcoming lane closure on 285 to address this rather alarming situation. I was at work, but it was late in the day and no one else had posted, so I posted something about my dislike for those LEFT tabs that are unfortunately mandated by the MUTCD. Someone replied-- a guy who designs signage for another DOT-- posted his disagreement with me, I posted back, mentioning how the APL's at that interchange were... non MUTCD-compliant. We had a nice little conversation going, which I wished to continue when I finished my drive home from work. However, when I arrived home and checked Facebook, my apparently-offensive post was gone, as well as my new pal's reply. Shortly thereafter, GDOT deleted the whole post. 

--- End quote ---

I applaud you for having GDOT's attention at all. They don't have systems in place do cover basic maintenance, aND if I'm wrong, they should be called out for deliberate discrimination by avoising basic maintenance in Black and Hispanic areas of the Atlanta metro.

I saw on GMA one morning an interview withe the GDOT employee who was putting the clever pandemic messages on the freeway message boards.

I emailed her at GDOT and requested she do an anti-littering campaign. A couple of months later, I see on the message boards, "Keep the roads clear, We don't litter Here".

It was exactly the tone I wanted, to invoke a sense of pride in where we live and that litter was making a poor reflection on citizens as well as the city.

I just did a 900 mile round trip to Wilmington, Raleigh Charlotte and back to Atlanta.

The new section of I-85 North is fine except the all concrete median has a continuous line of trash and debris for miles going Northbound.

GDOT pairs litter pickup with mowing, but the medians of i-75 and I-85 need much more frequent cleanup.

As for NC, they have a lot of maintenance needs across the state with many damaged signs etc. There are few sections of I-85 that remain 4 lanes, about 40 miles between Durham and the VA State line, about !5 at the SC State line, and only an 8 mile stretch between Durham and the merging of I-40/ I-85 duplex.

That 30-40 mile duplex through Burlington to Greensboro took almost a whopping 10 years to build in the 90s because of being an active highway during construction.

What was most impressive was the stretch South of Greensboro through Charlotte which is now 8 lanes of all concrete pavement and it's just I-85 not a duplex of two interstates. That redeemed NCDOT in my eyes.

I-95 is for out of state traffic and of lesser importance for NC residents but now is finally being rebuilt with several sections totaling I guess around 60 miles or so being widened to 8 lanes.

architect77:

--- Quote from: Tom958 on June 11, 2021, 06:49:22 PM ---So, yesterday I was on GDOT's metro Atlanta Facebook page. They'd posted about an upcoming lane closure on 285 to address this rather alarming situation. I was at work, but it was late in the day and no one else had posted, so I posted something about my dislike for those LEFT tabs that are unfortunately mandated by the MUTCD. Someone replied-- a guy who designs signage for another DOT-- posted his disagreement with me, I posted back, mentioning how the APL's at that interchange were... non MUTCD-compliant. We had a nice little conversation going, which I wished to continue when I finished my drive home from work. However, when I arrived home and checked Facebook, my apparently-offensive post was gone, as well as my new pal's reply. Shortly thereafter, GDOT deleted the whole post. 

--- End quote ---

The issue of the left tabs is all part of a bigger issue of using the size and shape of overheads to convey information without words and the importance of upcoming exits.

GDOT has never grasped that notion and did the opposite by wanting to use one tall and narrow sign size for all  exits which requires more time to understand and process the info.

One of the worst examples is this at I-75 Northbound at I-285. All of the signs are the same size, and there is no hierarchy of importance of the exits, and also the text sizes are multiple sizes and letter spacing is inconsistent.

I swear I believe our big airport precludes Atlantans and GDOT decision makers from driving through other parts of the country and they are literally oblivious to how much better other states can build and maintain highways. Such a shame.

At the bottom is US401 overheads just north of Raleigh at the interchange of its Outerloop which is bout 60% complete and when finished will have a toll for over half of the ~65 mile loop.

I wish Georgia would have overheads on non-interstate highways and especially at interstate junctions (if they would cantilever and not lean in one direction or the other).


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